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fore here selected, we see how the Almighty is often the expositor of his own word by the displays of his providence, and the manifestations of his grace. Nor will this work be found unsuitable to put into the hands of young people, as it will not only afford them biographical and historical information for every day in the year, but engage

them to read the holy Scriptures, and to consider them as they are, the word of God, mighty through him to illuminate the mind, direct the wavering, comfort the distressed, and a benefit to society at large.

In collecting and arranging the events contained in this volume, the writer can truly say that he has found much profit to his own mind; though it has been chiefly done in hours of languor and pain. That it may be also rendered useful to every reader is his most earnest prayer.

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January 1. PSALM XC. 10. For it is soon cut off, and we fly away. Such is the description given us by the sacred writer of human life. How well, at the commencement of a new year, to stand still and consider the shortness of time, and the vanity of all things here.

The ancients, says Mr. Brooks, represented time with wings, not running but flying.

The Egyptians drew it with threc heads; the first of a greedy wolf, gaping for time past; because it hath ravenously devoured the memory of so many things past recalling. The second of a crowned lion, roaring for time present; because it hath the principality of all actions, for which it calls loud. The third of a deceitful dog, fawning for time to come; because it feeds some men with many flattering hopes, to their eternal destruction.

When Popilius, by order of the Roman senate, re. quired Antiochus to withdraw his army from the king of Egypt, and he desired time to deliberate upon it, the Roman drew a circle with his wand about him, and said, In hoc stans delibera, give a present answer

you move. Thus eternity, says Dr. Bates, whose proper emblem is à circle, a figure without end, presents to us life and death, that after a short time expects all men; and here we must make our choice. And

a mortal coldness possess us in an affair of such importance? We cannot so fast repair the ruins of the body, but that every day death makes nearer ap

and takes away some spoils that cannot be recovered, and will shortly force the soul to leave its

before

shall

proaches,

fore here selected, we see how the Almighty is often the expositor of his own word by the displays of his providence, and the manifestations of his grace. Nor will this work be found unsuitable to put into the hands of young people, as it will not only afford them biographical and historical information for every day in the year, but engage them to read the holy Scriptures, and to consider them as they are, the word of God, mighty through him to illuminate the mind, direct the wavering, comfort the distressed, and a benefit to society at large.

In collecting and arranging the events contained in this volume, the writer can truly say that he has found much profit to his own mind; though it has been chiefly done in hours of languor and pain. That it may be also rendered useful to every reader is his most earnest prayer.

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THE

PRACTICAL EXPOSITOR.

January 1. Psalm Xc. 10. For it is soon cut off, and we fly away. Such is the description given us by the sacred writer of human life. How well, at the commencement of a new year, to stand still and consider the shortness of time, and the vanity of all things here.

The ancients, says Mr. Brooks, represented time with wings, not running but flying.

The Egyptians drew it with three heads; the first of a greedy wolf, gaping for time past; because it hath ravenously devoured the memory of so many things past recalling. The second of a crowned lion, roaring for time present; because it hath the principality of all actions, for which it calls loud. The third of a deceitful dog, fawning for time to come; because it feeds some men with many flattering hopes, to their eternal destruction.

When Popilius, by order of the Roman senate, re. quired Antiochus to withdraw his army from the king of Egypt, and he desired time to deliberate upon it, the Roman drew a circle with his wand about him, and said, In hoc stans delibera, give a present answer before you move: Thus eternity, says Dr. Bates, whose proper emblem is a circle, a figure without end, presents to us life and death, that after a short time expects all men; and here we must make our choice. And shall a mortal coldness possess us in an affair of such importance ? We cannot so fast repair the ruins of the body, but that every day death makes nearer approaches, and takes away some spoils that cannot be re. covered, and will shortly force the soul to leave its habitation ; and shall we got secure a retreat for it in. the sanctuary of life and immortality ?"

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January 2.
Isaiah i. 17. Seek judgment, relieve the oppressed, judge the

fatherless, plead for the widow.
LAVATER died at Zurich, 1801, in the 60th year of his
age.-The following account of the spirited and bene--
volent conduct of this excellent man is a fine practical
exposition of the above passage. There lived in the
city of Zurich, and even a member of its senate, a most
wretched character, who during the time he had been
prefect over a district of the canton, had committed
innumerable acts of the grossest injustice ; yea, such
abominable crimes, that all the country people loudly
reproached and cursed him; but no one dared to call
him to public account, he being related to several gen-
tlemen who were members of the Zurich government,
and son-in-law to the principal magistrate of the city.
Mr. Lavater, after having often heard of, and duly ex-
amined into the atrocities of the prefect, committed
even against helpless widows and orphans, could at last
no longer refrain himself. His tender feeling heart was
glowing with the noblest sentiments of justice and hu-
manity, and felt an irresistible desire to plead the cause
of the poor and oppressed. Being only twenty one
years of age, and knowing the connection of the culprit,
he was fully aware that his stepping forward in this
cause would expose him to the frowns of the great and
mighty, and occasion much uneasiness and anxiety even
to his nearest and dearest relations; but he was deter.
mined to obey God rather than man. Having prepared
himself by earnest prayer, and consulted an intimate
friend, he first addressed a letter to the prefect, in
which he strongly reproached him for his detestable
actions, and freely declared his full intention to bring
him to public justice, should he not restore his spoil
within the term of two months. This term having
elapsed, and the warning proving in vain, Mr. Lavater
proceeded to print a most solemn indictment against

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