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LITERARY AND COMMERCIAL ADVERTISER.

REMOVAL. Mr. Muckansie, Dentist, begs leave to acquaint his friends that he has Removed from Great Queen Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields, to 18, King Street, Bloomsbury Square. The Public are respeotfully informed, that Mr. N. FELSTEAD's

ACADEMY FOR DANCING, No. 8, Goswell Road, opposite Spencer Street, is now open, where Ladies and Gentlemen are instructed in Waltzing, Quadrilles, Spanish Dances, and every other department of Fashionable Dancing.

Evening Academy --- Monday and Friday Evenings, from 7 till 11 o'clock. Juvenile Academy --Wednesday and Saturday, from 3 till 5.

Mr. Felstead begs most respectfully to inform the Parents and Guardians of the Juvenile Branches that may be intrusted to his care, that in addition to the Fashionable style of Teaching, he will undertake to improve their general demeanour and gracefulness of carriage. Private Lessons any hour of the day. A Morping Quadrille Party, for Ladies only. Cards of terms to be had as above. Quadrille Books and Cards of every description. Schools and Families punctually attended within ten miles of London.

CHARLES EAGLAND, SURGICAL MECHANICIAN, 326, Oxford-street, corner of Regent Circus, London, Inventor and Constructor of Mechanical Aids for Surgical Cases, returns his grateful acknowledgments of past favors, and respectfully informs professional Gentlemen and the public, that he has removed from Poland-street, to more extensive and commodious premises at the South West corner of Regent - Circus in Oxford-street ; where every description of Mechanism appertaining to his business, will be Manufactured, and strict personal attention paid to the simplicity, ease, and effect required in the construetion of whatever is intrusted to him. His Spinal Apparatos, and compresses for Prolapsus Ani; Prolapsus Uteri, and his Umbilical, and Ventral Girdles, have received the approbation of, and are recommended by, professional Gentlemen of the highest reputation, for their simplicity, and sufficiency, under all variations of bodily position. Trusses and Girdles, for every description of Hernia, single, double, and compound, reducible or irreducible, for Adults and Infants : Suspepsory Bandages or Hunting Trusses, Riding Belts, elastic and non-elastic, in great variety; Abdominal sustaining and compressing Belts, for corpulency; Lacing Stockings for varicose Veins, &c. Knee Caps, and a variety of other Aids.

Private entrance at the farthest end of the court immediately on the left in Swallow Place---coming from Oxford-street, down Swallow Passage.--Mrs. E. attends the Ladies.---Letters post paid will receive immediate attention.

S. BARNETT most respectfully informs the Nobility, Gentry, and the Public in general, that he has just arrived from the Continent, with an unequalled Assortment in Dress, forming one of the most choice and extensive Collections ever witnessed in this Country; and in order to meet the wishes of the Nobility and Gentry, (by whose Patronage he bas, daring a period of many years, been supported) he has opened" Show Rooms" at his private Residence, 5, Bedford-strect, Bedford-square, for the Inspection of bis varied Assortment, consisting of rich figured and plain Gros de Naples (whieb for richness in colors, and beauty in patterns, cannot be equalled by any other house in London), Velvets, Satins, Gloves, Ribbons, Handkerchiefs, Cashmeres, Merinos, &c. and every article of Costume peculiar to the French Manufactories. Real India Shawls, Taffetas, Crapes, Handkerchiefs, and a collection of other fanciful goods, too numerous to be inserted in the limits of an advertisement; and as the purchases were personally made by S. B. on the Continent, he is enabled (without exaggeration) to sell them full 20 per Cent. lower than any other Establishment.---Foreign Show Rooms, 5, Bedford-street, Bedford-square.

Open from 10 till dusk.---N.B. Families attended at their own bonses,

NATIONAL MAGAZINE,

AND

GENERAL REVIEW.

Vol. I. No, V.- MARCH 1, 1827.

CONTENTS.

J. BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIR OF ROBERT BANKS JENKINSON,

EARL OF LIVERPOOL
11. The Harp
III. Modern Witchcraft
IV. The Storm

V. The last Day of Term
VI. The Literature of England, No. IV.
VII. Retrospection
VIII. Collectanea, No. IV.
IX. Portugal

X. Literary Gossip; or, a Visit to my Publisher.
XI. Recollections of London, No. II. Westminster Abbey
XII. Song. By J. Suckling
XIII. Capillology versus Phrenology
XIV. Impromptu on the Marriage of Mr. Lamb to Miss Priest.
XV. Local Reminiscences, No. I. St. Clement Danes ..
XVI. A Lesson for Cold Weather
XVII. Review :---Godwin's History of the Commonwealth of England, vol. ii. ;

Recollections of the Life of O'Keeffe ; Southey's War in Portugal;

Elizabeth de Bruce; The Natchez; and Truckleborough Hall .. XVIII. Monthly Register---the Drama, No. V.; Literary and Domestic Intel

ligence, &c. &c.

259 26+ 264 268 269 273 280 281 285 286 295 297 298 304 304 308

309

317

LONDON:

HENRY DIXON, 19, CAREY STREET, LINCOLN'S INN FIELDS; SHERWOOD AND CO. 20, PATERNOSTER ROW; J. CHAPPELL, AND E. WILSON, ROYAL EXCHANGE; J. CAPES, 111, FLEET STREET ; W. TAYLOR, WHITE HART COURT, LOMBARD STREET; SUSTENANCE AND STRETCH, PERCY STREET, RATHBONE PLACE ; J. ATTFIELD, KINGSTON ; J. RUSHER, READING; J. DECK, BURY ST. EDMUND's; J. WRIGHTSON, BIRMINGHAM ; E. WILLIAMS, BATH ; MESSRS. LANCASTERS, BRISTOL; J. STACEY, NORWICH ; T. MILLER, LYNN ; A. GRAHAM, DUBLIN ; J. SUTHERLAND, EDINBURGH; AND ALL OTHER BOOKSELLERS.

Price, 1s. 6d.

D. Cartwright, Printer, 91, Bartholomew Cloge.

TO CORRESPONDENTS.

We thank S. D. for his bint; the subject has been some time under our notice.

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Sancho,"is“ Sancho" in name only; the spirit, the wit of Cervantes are not to be found in his composition.

W. L. B. has very much obliged us---his request shall be attended to.

We cortainly have some of the sublimest poetry sent to us for insertion: the following is an extract from a composition, which our Correspondent entreats us to publish---assuring us that it is intended 10 aid the cause of true religion.

“ Many a tear was shed o'er his grave,
Tears from the simple, and tears from the brave;
Living, he scorn'd to be a slave,
And dying, he died his soul to save.

“ And is he not happy? he must---he must,
That's what I hope, and that's what I trust;
Throughout his life he was true and just,
And o'er his tomb we have plac'd his bust."

We hope the letter sent to Deal, and the parcel to Portsmouth; were received. If one moment could be spared from “war’s alarms,” we should be highly gratified by a few lines.

H. I. will scarcely suit us.

“ Moletes” shall be inserted in our next.

“ Tim-tam" is a queer dog, but too vulgar.

One thing we must address to all our Correspondents---Be ye early in the field ; communications sent after the 7th of the month, cannot be certain of insertion.

Witness Ourself,

JON. OLDBUCK, the Younger.

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When, a few months ago, we announced our intention of giving in the pages of the National Magazine brief Biographical Sketches of the leading Statesmen of whom Great Britain can at present boast, we did not anticipate that the Noble Premier would have been forced upon our attention so early, and in .so painful a manner as it has pleased Divine Providence should be the case. Within the memory of the present generation, few events have occurred more suddenly disarranging, or, as is at present anticipated, more seriously affecting, the domestic policy of the British Empire, than the unanticipated affliction which has befallen this worthy man. The public voice, whilst it is unanimous in regretting the loss of his services, does not less certainly proclaim his manly and upright character---the unbending honesty by which he has been distinguished---and the good sense and policy of the measures which have been promoted by his influence. We are persuaded that we shall be rendering an acceptable service to our readers, by laying before them a short sketch of his public life.

Robert Banks Jenkinson, son of Charles Jenkinson, and of the daughter of Governor Watts of Bengal, was born on the 7th of June, 1770. His mother died a few months after his birth. At an early age he was sent to an academy at Parson's Green, near Fulham; from whence, when thirteen years old, he was removed to the Charter House. At both of these schools he distinguished himself as a youth of uncommon ability; and when removed to Christ Church at Oxford, more than justified, by his proficiency there, the expectations which had been entertained of him. His father, who on the 21st of August, 1786, was created Baron Hawkesbury, of Hawkesbury in the County of Gloucester, was a man of superior attainments, and early marked out for his son a course of studies well suited to render him a proficient in public economy; the abilities of the son aided the father's intentions, and the youthful Jenkinson was looked up to as a promising Statesman.

After leaving Christ Church, he travelled on the Continent for several years, and was at Paris at the first breaking out of the French revolution. The events be there witnessed, seem to have produced the same effect upon him as they did upon Mr. Huskisson, who also was at Paris at that time-a determined hostility and aversion to mob-government, and an attachment to rational freedom, as opposed to the wild and chimerical notions of the abettors of French politics. Upon his return to this country, in 1790, he was elected to serve in Parliament for the Borough of Rye, in Sussex. Being at that time under age, he returned to the Continent until the next year, when he took his seat. On the 29th of February, 1792, he rose, for the first time in the House of Commons, in opposition to some resolutions which were moved by Mr. Whitbread, condemnatory of the conduct of Ministers, in interfering between Russia and the Ottoman Porte, in a dispute concerning Oczakow and its district. In allusion to this maiden speech, the Annual Register, for that year, remarks that “ the argument on the balance of power was discussed in a full and complete manner, by the honorable Mr. Jenkinson, who addressed the house, for the first time in his life, in a style of elocution unusual in so young a man and so inexperienced a speaker."

From this time Mr. Jenkinson became a constant and very useful speaker, strenuously defending the policy of Mr. Pitt. On the 22d of April, 1793, we find him appointed to be one of the commissioners for the affairs of India, and in the year following he received the command of the Cinque Port Fencibles.

On the 25th of March, 1795, Mr. Jenkinson was inarried to Theodosia Louisa, daughter of Frederick, Earl of Bristol and Bishop of Derry, and sister to the present Marquis of Bristol. In the following year Lord Hawkesbury, the father of Mr. Jenkinson, was raised in the peerage to the dignity of Earl of Liverpool, whereupon Mr. Jenkinson became titular Lord Hawkesbury.

In February, 1799, we find him appointed Master of the Mint, and on the accession of the Addington administration, in 1801, he received the Seals of Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs. The chief object of this administration was to bring about a peace with the French republic, and a negociation for that purpose was opened early in the summer of 1801, between Lord Hawkesbury and M. Otto. After a correspondence of several months, preliminaries were signed on the 1st of October, and a definitive treaty concluded at Amiens on the 25th of March following. That the treaty of Amiens was one from which any glory resulted to Great Britain, may be fairly doubted; but under the circumstances in which the country was then placed, a peace was absolutely necessary, and the ministry who had accepted office in order to obtain it, had scarcely any other alternative than to put an end to the war, in the best way they could. The debates in Parliament upon the preliminaries, and afterwards upon the treaty, were extremely animated ; and Lord Hawkesbury was several times called upon to defend the conduct of the administration. His speeches upon all these occasions were bold, clear, and statesmanlike; not indeed adorned with much of the graces of language-that meretricious and captivating beauty, which so often leads astray-but distinguished by open manliness, and the honesty and simplicity of detail, which, up to the present time, continue to form the peculiarities of his lordship’s oratory.

The peace of Amiens was hailed by the people of England with extraordinary demonstrations of joy; but the ambition and tyranny

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