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The following message from the House of Bishops, was received in reply:

“The House of Bishops inform this House that they have passed the following resolution, the subject of the resolution of this House, passed some days ago (on the subject of the separate action of the Bishops making certain changes in the use of the Prayer Book) being under consideration:

" Resolved, That the action of the Bishops at the Convention of 1856, on the subject indicated in the resolution of the House of Clerical and Lay Deputies, having been preceded by the deliberations of a commission appointed at the Convention of 1853, and also by much deliberation and discussion, the House of Bishops are not prepared, at this very late hour of the session, to take any action which may seem to involve a reconsideration of their former action,"

Report on the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society.

“The Committee on the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society respectfully report :

“That they have had before them the several reports from the Missionary Bishops of this Church, and those holding special commissions to act as such, and report from the several foreign fields occupied by the Board of Missions of this Church. These have been considered in their order—their several statements and propositions have engaged as much of the time and deliberation of this Committee, as the peculiar circumstances of the Committee permitted.

“The Committee deem it unnecessary to prepare any argumentative paper on the importance and value of the Missionary work, or to spread upon the Journal an elaborate detail of the work done, or laid out to be done by the Board of Missions, and the several Missionaries. The reports of the various Bishops and Missionary Stations will be prepared with the Journal, as part of the documents of the Convention, and will thus be accessible to all members of the same.

“As the result of their earnest deliberations, and as embodying their unanimous opinions, the Committee beg leave to offer the following resolutions :

"1. Resolved, That the House of Clerical and Lay Deputies approves the establishment of the Mission in Japan, the establishment of a Mission to Brazil, and the expansion of the Missions to China and Africa.

2. Resolved, That this House recommend to the Board of Missions the taking of such measures towards the establishment of a Mission or Missions to the Spanish Main of South-America, Central America, and Mexico, as may be deemed proper, in the judgment of the Foreign Committee.

“3. Resolved, That the expansion of Missions already established, Domestic and Foreign, and the establishment of new Stations in still unoccupied fields will require, as a minimum, farther support not far from $250,000, this House would urge upon each member of this Church the imperative duty of contributing something to the Missionary work of this Church.

"4. Resolved, The House of Bishops concurring, That the jurisdiction of the Missionary Bishop in China be understood to include provisionally the Missions which are or may be established in the empire of Japan.

“5. Resolved, That the House learns with pleasure the termination of the

long-pending difficulties connected with the jurisdictions respectively of the English Bishop of Victoria, confining his jurisdiction to the Province of Cheh Kiang, and the American Bishop of China, to the Province of Kiang See.

“6. Resolved, That it is a matter of sincere congratulation and thanksgiving, that the debt of the Domestic Committee has, through the exertions of the indefatigable Secretary and General Agent, been paid off, and that that Committee presents itself before the Convention free from debt.

7. Resolved, That the Foreign and Domestic Committee be authorized and required to cause a more general diffusion of Missionary intelligence, and a more general collection of funds, either by paid Agents, or by the formation of Auxiliary District Societies, as they may judge expedient, under the direction of the Bishop of the Diocese.

Whereas, The spirit of toleration in religious concernments is cherished by the American people, and is guarded by the American Constitution; and

Whereas, In the island of Cuba, American citizens, professing the religion of Protestants, are not tolerated; their worship is not allowed; their dead are not buried with Christian burial; nor are the bodies of their deceased permitted by the law, without oppressive exactions, to be deported to their native land for sepulture; therefore

Resolved, The House of Bishops concurring, That a Joint Committee be appointed to address a memorial to the President of the United States, in the name and in behalf of the General Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America, requesting His Excellency, as the Supreme Executive of the nation, to address the Court of Her Catholic Majesty in Spain on this subject; and to take measures, by treaty, to procure for American citizens in Cuba, the liberty to establish the Protestant worship, and the Protestant Ministry, with liberty to hold real estate sufficient for suitable churches and church-yards; and that all, except sanitary, restriction on the deportation of the dead be abolished in Cuba."

The above resolutions were adopted, with the exception of the last, which the Committee were instructed to omit, by the following resolution :

“Whilst the members of this House most anxiously desire to see the right of worship and sepulture to our countrymen in the island of Cuba ; yet, as the action of this House, as an organized religious body, may, perhaps, become a dangerous precedent for hereafter interfering with the politics of the country, therefore,

Resolved, That the report be re-committed to the Committee with instructions to omit the resolution."

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Tabular View of the State of the Church.

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* New Jersey not included.
This Summary, it will be seen, includes only the organised Dioceses.

Consecration of Bishops. On Thursday, October 13th, the following persons were consecrated as Bishops of the Church : The Rev. William H. Odenheimer, D.D., as Bishop of New-Jersey; the Rev. Gregory T. Bedell, D.D., as Assistant Bishop of Ohio; the Rev. Alexander Gregg, D.D., as Bishop of Texas; and the Rev. Henry B. Whipple, D.D., as Bishop of Minnesota.

Missionary Bishops. During the General Convention, the Rev. Henry C. Lay, D.D., and the Rev. Joseph C. Talbot, D.D., were appointed Missionary Bishops. The former to the South West, and the latter to Nebraska and Utah.

The Rev. Jacob L. Clark, D.D., was appointed to the NorthWest, but he declining the appointment, the Rev. Dr. Talbot was nominated and elected.

FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE.

DEATH OF THE BISHOP OF ANTIGUA. --The last West Indies mail brought the news of an event which is as unexpected as it is deplored, and which confers an important piece of ecclesiastical patronage on the new liberal ministry. The Right Rev. Stephen Jordan Rigaud, D.D., F.R.A.S., Lord Bishop of Antigua, and member of the Executive Council of that island, died on the 16th of May, of yellow fever, after a brief tenure of his sacred office. Dr. Rigaud's career in England was in many respects a distinguished one. He was son of the late Stephen Peter Rigaud, M.A., formerly Fellow of Exeter College, who was an eminent astronomer, and held the post of Radcliffe Observer at Oxford from 1827 to 1839. In Michaelmas Term, 1838, he gained the highest honor of his university, a first-class both in classics and mathematics. After having been some time Fellow and Tutor of Exeter, where he obtained considerable reputation for his success with his pupils, he became head master's assistant at Westminster School, whence, after narrowly missing the head mastership of King Edward's School, Birmingham, (on the promotion of Mr. J. P. Lee to the bishopric of Manchester,) a most valuable as well as honorable post, he was transferred to the head mastership of Queen Elizabeth's School, Ipswich. This school was in but little reputation when Mr. Rigaud took it. Mr. Rigaud's great ability, indefatigable industry, popular manners, and earnest Christian life, contrived very shortly to reverse the state of things entirely, and Ipswich School became widely known beyond the limits of Suffolk. A new and splendid school was built in 1852 so numerous were the applications for admission; and it prospered continuously. Dr. Rigaud, who had a year or two before taken

the degree of D.D., at Oxford, and Select Preacher before the University in Michaelmas Term, 1856, was nominated in 1857, by the Right Hon. H. Labourchere, M.P., Secretary for the Colonies, under Lord Palmerston's last administration, to the Bishop of Antigua, with a salary of £2000 a year; and the clergy, gentry, and people of Ipswich on that occasion presented him with a splendid testimonial indicative of their sense of his merits in promoting every educational, philanthropic, and religious improvement in their town. In Antigua his career was short, but sufficiently long to mark him as an ornament to the Episcopate ; for his activity, cheerful disposition, and deep piety, impressed his flock so thoroughly, that he was honored with a public funeral, the Lieutenant-Governor heading it. The office is now in the gift of the Duke of Newcastle, Secretary for the Colonies.

The intelligence of the death of the Bishop of Antigua excited much regret in Ipswich.

The GREAT REVIVAL.—The extensive religious awakening in Ireland, greater than heretofore in the country, is extending to Scotland and Wales. It has reached the colliers of Staffordshire, and in one place it is estimated that there are five hundred converts. From among their own number, a collier has been raised up who daily preaches the word with great power. In many of the coal-pits daily prayer-meetings and Bible-readings are held. In South-Wales, so extraordinary is the revival interest that all the churches and chapels are crowded on week days as well as Sabbaths. Prayer-meetings in churches, in school-rooms, in work-shops, and even in fields, are held morning and evening. In one town eight public houses have been closed since the work began. It is now spreading into North-Wales. A clergyman of the Established Church writes : “There is no enthusiasm, but a deep, profound, and awful solemn impression." In some districts notorious for blasphemy, an oath is now never heard, and drunkards in thousands have become total abstainers. It is estimated that in two counties only, 9000 persons within the last five months have been turned to God.

THE BISHOP OF SIERRA LEONE.—The African and Sierra Leone Weekly Advertiser of June 3d, announces the death of the Bishop of that Diocese, the Right Rev. John Bowen, LL.D., appointed to the see in 1857. Having had several attacks of the yellow fever, so often and so fatally prevailing on that coast, and having got over them, it was hoped that his life would be spared for many years. The following letter to the editor of the Record presents an interesting and important question:

“ After reading the Dean of Carlisle's letter in the Record of last Wednesday, urging the appointment of a native bishop as a successor to the late deeply-lamented Dr. Bowen, I remembered reading an account of the salubrity of our colonies; namely, the results some years back of the Statistical Society, showing the deaths per annum among 1000 soldiers to bemin Great Britain, 14; in Jamaica, 48; at Madras, 25; in Sierra Leone, 483; in the Ionian Isles, 25; in Malta, 16; in Canada, 16; in Nova Scotia and New-Brunswick, 14; at Cape of Good Hope and Cape Town, 131.

“Now, I think the above results fully justify the Dean of Carlisle's appeal for a native Bishop at Sierra Leone ; yet, nevertheless, not altogether, as he observes, on account of the climate, (for Dr. Weeks, the instructor of that great African missionary. the Rev. Samuel Cowther, was a missionary there seventeen years before he was made Bishop,) but it would, I think, do away with an unchristian prejudice and pride that seems to exist in high quarters against a man of color being made a Bishop of the Church of England.”

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