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of 250,0001. made last year, 150,000%. had been repaid; and a further sum now in hand he proposed to devote to certain temporary services required during the period of transition to the new electoral districts. Society in Ireland appeared on the brink of a great and salutary change; the relations of landlord, tenant, and labourer, were becoming assimilated to those of more civilized lands; agrarian crime had diminished; and the best prospects existed for the ultimate condition of the people. The noble lord concluded by moving the consideration of certain resolutions embodying the substance of his speech. After a long desultory conversation, the propositions were agreed to, and the House resumed. The Irish Party Processions Suppression Bill was then read a second time. The dropped debate on the Irish Chancery Reform Bill was resumed. Mr. J. Stuart's amendment to read the bill a second time this day six months gave rise to much discussion, and was ultimately withdrawn. The Bill was then read a second time. The motion for going into committee on the Registrar's Office Bankruptcy Bill was negatived by 61 to 57. A Bill was brought in for assimilating the Civil Bill Process in Irish Boroughs to that in Counties.

(LORDS.) The Acts of Parliament Abbreviation Bill was Feb. read a second time. Lord Stanley in moving for papers, brought 18. under their lordships' notice the dismissal by the Irish Lord Lieutenant of the Earl of Roden from the Irish magistracy for his conduct respecting the investigation of the Dolly's Brae massacre. The Earl of Clarendon, in an elaborate speech, justified his conduct. After some remarks from Earl Roden, the Earl of Winchelsea, Lord Brougham, the Marquess of Clanricarde, and Lord Stanley, the motion was agreed to.

(COMMONS.) On the motion for the second reading of the Australian Colonies Government Bill, a long debate took place on the principles of the measure, in which Mr. Scott, Mr. Labouchere, Mr. Roebuck, Lord J. Russell, Mr. F. Peel, Sir W. Molesworth, Mr. Anstey, Mr. Mangles, Mr. Hume, Mr. Hawes, Mr. V. Smith, Mr. Adderley, Mr. M. Milnes, Mr. Wyld, and Mr. Stanford, took part. The bill was then read a second time. Irish Landlord and Tenant Bill and a Commons Inclosure Bill were brought in by Government.

Feb.

An

(LORDS.) The Railway Abandonment Bill was read a second time, and a bill presented by the Earl of Glengall for facilitating 19. the Transfer of Land in Ireland, a first time.

(COMMONS.) Mr. D'Israeli having presented a petition from Great Marlow setting forth the difficulties under which the proprietors of real property laboured in consequence of the undue burdens imposed upon them and of the operations of free trade, and praying for the restoration of protection, proceeded in an elaborate speech to move for a committee of the whole House to consider resolutions for the remission of taxes on real property1, by furnishing the establishment charges connected with the relief and maintenance of the poor from the general revenue of the country; 2, by defraying from the consolidated fund the rates levied under the machinery of the poor law for the registration of births and deaths, the preparation of the jury and borough lists, for the maintenance of the police, &c.; and, 3, the transference to the general revenue of the charge for the relief of casual poor. The motion led to a debate on protection and free trade, and was adjourned. Mr. P. Wood brought in a Bill to substitute Religious Affirmations for Oaths in certain cases. The Irish Judgments Bill was read a second time. The Irish Party Processions Bill passed committee.

Feb.

20,

(COMMONS.) The second reading of the Bankrupt and Insolvent Members Bill was opposed by Mr. Goulburn, who moved the second reading this day six months. The amendment went to

a division, and was carried by 73 to 34; the bill was consequently lost. Mr. Halsey moved the second reading of the Small Tenements Rating Bill. Mr. P. Scrope opposed the Bill, and moved the second reading this day six months. After a short discussion the house divided, and the second reading of the Bill was carried by 182 to 2. Mr. Frewen's Benefices in Plurality Bill, the object of which was to prevent any clergyman from holding two benefices unless they adjoined each other; and Sir J. Pakington's Larceny Summary Jurisdiction Bill, were severally read a second time, as was also Mr. Southeron's Tenants at Rack Rent Relief Bill.

21.

(LORDS.) The Slave Trade Committee of last session was Feb. re-appointed. The Acts of Parliament Abbreviation Bill passed committee. The Railway Abandonment Bill was referred to a Select Committee. The Marquess of Lansdowne laid on the table the report of the commission on Intramural Burial. The Earl of Desart moved resolutions condemnatory of out-door relief in Ireland, and for a return to the original law of 1838. This motion led to a debate, and was subsequently withdrawn, the Marquess of Lansdowne having moved the order of the day.

(COMMONS.) Mr. M. Milnes brought in a Bill for the correction and improvement of Juvenile Offenders. The adjourned debate on Mr. D'Israeli's motion was resumed by Mr. Stafford, who supported the resolution, as did also Mr. Gladstone, Mr. Buck, and Mr. G. Berkeley; they were opposed by Sir J. Graham, Mr. J. Wilson, Sir Robert Peel (who expressed his conviction that protection was unattainable), and Lord J. Russell. Mr. D'Israeli having replied, the house divided; for going into committee 252, against 273.

Feb.

22.

(LORDS.) The Royal Assent was given by commission to the Irish County Cess Bill. Lord Brougham's Criminal Law Consolidation Bill was read a second time.

(COMMONS.) The British Electric Telegraph Bill was read a second time, as were also the Irish Parliamentary Franchise Bill, the Commons Inclosure, the Irish Polling Places Increase, and Estates Leasing Bilis. A Bill brought in by Lord J. Russell, for the better management of the woods, forests, and land revenues of the Crown, and another by Sir W. Somerville, to prohibit the payment of wages in certain cases in Ireland otherwise than in the current coin of the realm, were read a first time.

25.

(Lords.) After some remarks from Lord Minto in reply to Feb. Lord Brougham, respecting the cases of Commander Pitman, Lieutenant Graham, and Mr. Elliot, their lordships went into committee on the Ecclesiastical Commission Bill. On an amendment, moved by Earl Powis, to clause 12, which as it now stood would, it was alleged, prevent the creation of new bishoprics, the committee divided, and the amendment was carried against Ministers by 31 to 26. For clause 15 the Bishop of Salisbury moved the substitution of another, which was carried by 21 to 19. Some clauses were added to the Bill on the suggestion of the Bishop of Oxford.

(COMMONS.) On the order of the day for going into committee on the Irish Parliamentary Suffrage Bill, Mr. D'Israeli urged the postponement of the measure. After some discussion, Lord J. Manners moved the consideration of the Bill that day three weeks. This amendment was rejected by 185 to 115. During the evening seven divisions subsequently took place on motions, the object of which was to delay the measure: on all of these the Government had large majorities, but were at last obliged to give way. Bills brought in by Sir W. Somerville requiring the abstracts of Irish

turnpike roads and bridges to be annually laid before Parliament; by Admiral Dundas for the improvement of Greenwich; and by Mr. C. Lewis for the consolidation of the offices of the Registrar of Public Carriages and Commissioner of Police, were read a first time.

(LORDS.) The Earl of Mountcashel, in moving for papers, Feb. brought under their lordships' notice the atrocious misconduct of 26. the surgeons and other officers of emigrant ships to Australia. Earl Nelson brought in a Bill to regulate the appointment of Chaplains in Foreign Parts.

(COMMONS.) Lord R. Grosvenor, in moving for leave to bring in a Bill to repeal the Attorneys' and Solicitors' Annual Certificate Duty, originated a debate, which was adjourned. Mr. W. J. Fox moved for leave to bring in a Bill to promote Secular Education. Mr. Slaney having seconded the motion, an interesting conversation followed, after which leave was given to bring in the Bill. Mr. Fitzroy obtained leave to bring in a Bill to extend the jurisdiction of the County Courts to cases involving a sum of 50%. Mr. Hume made a motion for the remission of the duty on bricks and timber used in the construction of cottages, which was afterwards, by leave, withdrawn. Bills for the regulation of railway traffic and to amend the highway laws of South Wales were brought in. Mr. Lacy moved for leave to bring n a Bill to promote Extramural Interments, by giving railway companies the power to have cemeteries; the further consideration of this subject was postponed. The Commons' Inclosure Bill was read a third time and passed. The Irish Boroughs' Civil Bill Process Bill passed through committee. Feb. (COMMONS.) Mr. J. S. Wortley moved the second reading of the Marriage with a Deceased Wife's Sister Bill. Sir F. Thesiger opposed the Bill at great length, and moved the second reading this day six months. The debate was adjourned.

27.

Feb. 28.

(LORDS.) The Ecclesiastical Commission Bill was reported with amendments. The Irish Party Processions Bill was read a

second time.

(COMMONS.) Mr. Hume moved for leave to bring in a Bill to amend the national representation by extending the franchise to all resident occupiers or lodgers of twelve months who have been duly rated to the poor; to enact voting by ballot; triennial parliaments; an increase in the number of representatives; and the abolition of the property qualification of members. Sir J. Walmsley, in an eloquent speech, seconded the motion, which was supported by Mr. F. O'Connor, Mr. P. Wood, Mr. Roebuck, and Mr. B. Osborne, opposed by Mr. Drummond and Lord J. Russell, and on a division, lost by 242 against 96. A Bill was brought in by Mr. Aglionby, to effect the enfranchisement of lands under Copyhold Tenure. Mr. F. Maule brought in a Bill to simplify the titles by which Scotch congregations hold real property for the purposes of religious worship or education.

March 1.

(COMMONS.) The House, in committee on the Irish Parliamentary Suffrage Bill, discussed several verbal amendments to clause 1; on coming to that part of the clause which proposed an 87. rating as the qualification for the suffrage, Mr. G. A. Hamilton moved to substitute a rating at 157., which, after a spirited debate, was rejected by 213 over 144. Clause 1 passed, and the House resumed. The Irish Registration of Deeds was read a second time. In Committee of Supply a vote of 17,000,000 of Exchequer bills was taken. Mr. Headlam brought in a Bill to amend the law relating to the Conveyance of Real Property. (LORDS.) Lord Gough took the oaths and his seat. The Earl of Granville brought in a Bill to secure an independent and continuous Auditing of Railway Accounts by means of a permanent central board. Lord Stanley originated a discussion on the management

March 4.

clauses of the National Education Committee; after which the Irish Party Processions Bill passed through committee, and the Ecclesiastical Commission Bill was read a third time and passed.

(COMMONS.) In committee on the Irish Parliamentary Suffrage Bill, Mr. Reynolds's amendment on clause 6, to reduce the borough qualification from 87. to 57., was rejected by 142 to 90. The Chairman then reported progress. The Metropolitan Public Carriages Registration Bill was read a second time, as were also the Irish Turnpike Road and Bridge Trusts, and the Scotch Titles of Religious Congregations Bills.

March (LORDS.) The Commons Inclosure Bill, and, on the motion of Lord Brougham, a Bill for the Removal of Obstructions in the Scotch Corn Trade, were read a second time.

5,

(COMMONS.) Mr. Slaney's motion for a Standing Committee to report on plans for the social improvement of the working classes," was, after some discussion, withdrawn. Mr. Mackinnon moved for " a Select Committee to ascertain the most expeditious mode of Postal Communication between London and Paris," which was agreed to with the addition of the words" and the north of Europe." Alderman Sidney's motion for leave to bring in a Bill "to abolish fines and stamp duties on the admission of freemen into corporations," was opposed by the Attorney General, and negatived without division. Mr. Mitchell moved for a committee on the Timber Duties, "with the view of remitting the duty on all wood used in shipbuilding;" the motion, after a debate, went to a division, and was carried by 45 to 32.

March

6.

The

(COMMONS.) Mr. Fagan having withdrawn his Irish Boroughs Civil Bills Bill, the Affirmation Bill was read a second time. adjourned debate on the Marriage with a Deceased Wife's Sister Bill was resumed, and after a long discussion the second reading was carried by 182 to 130.

March (LORDS.) Lord Londesborough and Lord Overstone took the A bill to prevent Sunday Trading was, on

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oaths and their seats.

the motion of the Earl of Harrowby, read a second time, and referred to a select committee.

(COMMONS.) Mr. P. Scrope moved the appointment of a commission to Inquire into the condition of the Kilrush Union. The motion was opposed by Government and rejected by 76 to 63. Mr. H. Berkeley's motion for leave to bring in a Bill to enact Voting by Ballot was negatived by 121 to 176. Bills were then brought in by Lord Melgund to reform and extend the Scotch School Establishment; by Mr. P. Wood to prevent Vestry or other Meetings in Churches; by Mr. Adair, to provide a more equitable distribution of the charge for the Relief of the Poor in Cities and Towns; and by Mr. Baines to amend the Act of 1845 relating to the support of Union Schools. The Metropolitan Public Carriages Registrar Bill passed through Committee.

March

(LORDS.) The Irish Party Processions Bill was read a third time and passed.

8. (COMMONS.) In answer to Mr. Reynolds, Lord J. Russell in

timated that Government intended to abolish the office of Irish Lord Lieutenant. On the motion for going into Committee of Supply on the army estimates, Mr. Cobden moved resolutions for the reduction of the annual expenditure to the amount in 1835. A long debate followed, after which the motion was lost by 272 to 89. The House then went into committee, but no progress was made. On resuming, the Real Property Conveyance Bill was read a second time; and the Irish Turnpike Road and Bridge Trusts Bill passed through Committee.

March

(LORDS.) Earl Granville having moved the second reading of the Railway Audit Bill, Lord Stanley detailed the provisions of a 11. Bill which had been drawn up on the same subject by delegates of some of the great railway companies; the Bill passed the second reading on the understanding that both Bills should be referred to a Select Committee.

(COMMONS.) In committee of supply on the army estimates, Mr. Hume moved a reduction in the number of the land forces. A long discussion followed, after which the amendment was lost by 223 to 50; the vote was then agreed to, as was also a vote of £1,700,000 for the expense of the land forces. Sir F. Baring then brought forward the navy estimates, and concluded by proposing a vote of 39,000 men for the naval service. Mr. Hume moved that the number be 31,400, the average for the six years ending with 1839; this amendment was negatived by 117 to 19. The vote was then agreed to, and the House having resumed, the Metropolitan Carriages Registration Bill was read a third time, and Lord J. Russell brought in a Bill to reduce the salaries of the Chief Justices of the Queen's Bench and Common Pleas to 8,000l. and 7,000 7. respectively.

(LORDS.) Lord Redesdale in presenting petitions for agriculMarch tural protection raised a debate on the existing distress among

12.

farmers, in which the Marquess of Lansdowne, the Earl of Malmesbury, and Earl Grey, took part.

(COMMONS.) Mr. H. Drummond proposed a resolution enforcing the necessity of reducing the expenditure, on the ground that the present weight of taxation depressed all classes by diminishing the fund at liberty for the employment of productive labour. A long, debate followed, during which Sir R. Peel, who opposed the motion, but, nevertheless, like almost all the speakers on both sides, concurred in the necessity for retrenchment, and believed that "some risk of loss in case of hostilities ought to be incurred for the sake of alleviating the burdens that would otherwise crush the energies of the country." The resolution was negatived by 190 to 156. On the motion of Mr. P. Wood a committee was appointed to search for precedents bearing on the case of the admission of Baron Rothschild to the House of Commons. Mr. Deedes brought in a Bill to amend the Parish Constables Act. In committee on the Irish Process and Practice Bill the clauses up to 10 were agreed to. On resuming the Irish Turnpike Road and Bridge Trusts Bill was read a third time and passed.

March

13.

(COMMONS.) The second reading of the County Rates Expenditure Control Bill was opposed by Sir J. Pakington, who moved an amendment which gave rise to an interesting discussion on the principle of the Bill, namely, the formation of county financial boards, consisting of magistrates and elected guardians in equal numbers, and was then withdrawn. The Bill was then read a second time, and ordered to be referred to a Select Committee. The second reading of Mr. Ewart's Libraries and Museums Bill was carried by 118 to 101.

March

14.

(LORDS.) Earl Grey, in a clear statesmanlike speech, in which he reviewed at considerable length the whole system of secondary punishment, moved the second reading of the Convict Prisons Bill. The Bill was read a second time without observation.

(COMMONS.) Lord Ashley moved for leave to bring in a Bill "to declare the intentions of the Legislature in respect of the hours and mode of working under the Factory Act," the object being to interdict the shift and relay system in factories. The motion having been seconded by Mr. Edwards, a discussion followed, after which leave was given. The Scotch Religious Congregations Titles Bill passed through Committee. A Bill with a similar title for England and Wales was brought in by Mr. Peto. The motion for the second reading of the Highways Bill gave rise to a short discussion, and

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