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Water fascines are six feet long, and from six to nine inches thick; they are made for covering a wet or marshy ground.

Covering fascines used in roofing magazines, saps, &c., are composed of the largest branches, and are strengthened by poles, to support a considerable weight.

Sap faggots, three feet long, are used in the Sap between the Gabions, in order to strengthen the parapet.

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Fascines are constructed in the following manner. number of stakes being driven into the ground and forming small crosses about three feet apart, each of these crosses, or tressels, is well fastened in the centre with ropes. On these tressels the branches are laid and bound round at every two feet by bands of well twisted birch, hazel, or other pliant wood, being tightened by a fascine choker, which also serves as a gauge to regulate the proper thickness of the fascine. In order to prepare these twigs, they should be laid over a fire until the sap is dried, and then twisted about until they become perfectly pliant. In laying the branches on the tressels, the shortest should be placed inside. Each fascine requires three men for its construction, besides two men employed in cutting the brushwood.

In order to calculate the quantity of fascines which may be required for any revêtement,

Divide the length of the work by the length, and the height of the work by the thickness, of a fascine. The two quotients multiplied will give the number of fascines requisite.

FASTNESS. A strong post, which being fortified by nature cannot easily be forced.

FATHOM. A measure of two yards, or six feet in length.

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Fathom, as it is sometimes used in conversation, means. to penetrate into; as, "we cannot fathom his design.' FAUSSE-BRAYE. Was a work in Fortification con

structed by Vauban, close to the escarpe of the enceinte, and consisting of a platform, the terrepleine of which was fixed at one half the height of the revêtement. On its outer edge a wall was raised, by means of which a command was obtained over the terrepleine of the Demilune; thus obliging the Enemy to cover himself there by strong parapets, and a fire grazing nearer to the bottom of the ditch, was also obtained. Its principal object, that of protecting the communication from the postern through the ditch, was indeed effected, but the disadvantages attending this work were found to be so numerous, as greatly to counterbalance any good resulting from its construction. For by experience it was found to be of considerable assistance to the besiegers in scaling the breach, besides subjecting its defenders to be seriously annoyed by the fragments of masonry, detached by the Enemy's fire, from the revêtement of the Body of the Place. It has been replaced by a detached work, called the Tenaille.

FEE. A payment claimed by persons in particular offices. All Officers, on obtaining their several commissions, are subject to the payment of fees, according to a scale published by authority. Officers on appointment to Regiments, are also charged with fees, or subscriptions, to the Regimental Mess, of one month's pay of each rank, and of twenty days' pay to the Band fund.

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FEES PAYABLE TO THE PUBLIC ON MILITARY COMMISSIONS UNDER THE ROYAL SIGN MANUAL.

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"An Officer obtaining a Commission in any Corps of Cavalry or Infantry of the Line, or Fencible Corps, is to be charged with the Fees thereof by the Regimental or District Paymaster, or by the Agent, accordingly as he shall commence receiving the Pay of his new appointment from the one or the other. Where the Fees, or a proportion thereof, shall have been received by the Paymaster, he is immediately to remit the same to the Agent.

"Should the Paymaster, or Agent, by whom the Officer's Pay shall have been first issued, cease to issue the same previously to the payment of the full amount of the said Fees, he is immediately to signify what proportion thereof shall have remained unpaid, to the Paymaster, or Agent, by whom the Officer's Pay is likely to be issued in future; who is to receive the same accordingly, and to remit it to the Agent by whom the Fees shall have been paid."Vide Collection of Regulations, dated "War Office, 25th April, 1807," page 162. N.B.-This Regulation also applies to Brevet Commissions.

FEINT. A mock assault, generally made to conceal

the true one.

FENCIBLE. Fencible Regiments are those raised for limited services, and for a definite period.

The Officers of Fencible Regiments rank with the Officers of the Militia, according to the dates of their respective commissions. Both these services take post as juniors in their several ranks, when serving with the Line, or Royal Marines, but are senior to Yeomanry, or Volunteer Corps.

FENCING.

The art of skilfully using the sword, either for attack or defence.

sea.

FERRY. A passage across a river, or branch of the When soldiers, on service, have occasion, on their march, to pass regular ferries in Scotland, the Officer Commanding may, at his option, pass over with his soldiers as passengers, or may hire the ferryboat for himself and party, debarring others for the time. In either case he is only obliged to pay one half the ordinary rate charged to passengers.

FIELD. In a military sense, the country which has become the scene of a campaign or battle.

FIELD DAY. A term used when a Regiment is taken out to the Field, for the purpose of being instructed in the Field Exercise and Evolutions. When in Camp, Officers Commanding Regiments wishing to have Field days, are required to specify the particular time, and obtain previous permission from Head Quarters.

FIELD MARSHAL. The highest rank in the British Service, excepting that of Captain General. He is saluted with the standards of all the forces, unless any of the Royal Family are present, and with the exception of the Household Troops, by whom these honours are not paid, except he is their Colonel.

FIELD OFFICERS. Colonels, Lieutenant-Colonels, and Majors, are called Field Officers. They should always be mounted, in order to give ground for movements, circulate orders, and correct pivots.

FIGURE. The works surrounding a fortified place are constructed on a geometrical figure, or Polygon, as it is usually termed. These are of two kinds; the Regular, in which the sides and angles of the Polygon are equal, and the Irregular, where they are unequal. The latter is capable of as good, if not a better, defence than the former; because the inequality of the ground presenting in itself means of defence, when aided by artificial con

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FLAGS OF TRUCE.

structions, affords as strong a resistance as the most regular Fortification.

FILE. A line of soldiers drawn up behind one another. As a general term, a file means two soldiers, the front and rear rank men. Every soldier of Infantry coVide also Distance.

vers a space of twenty-one inches.

FIRE. A word of command for soldiers to discharge their fire arms. It likewise expresses a general discharge against an Enemy.

Running fire. Is when a line of Troops fire rapidly in

succession.

FIRE ALARM.

When a fire breaks out, or any alarm is raised in a Garrison, all Guards are to be immediately under arms, the barriers shut, and the drawbridges raised, and so continue until the fire is extinguished.

FIRE ARMS. Every description of arms charged with powder and ball.

FIRE SHIP. A ship filled with combustible matter to set fire to the vessels of an Enemy.

FIRE WORKS. Compositions made of sulphur, charcoal, and nitre, used in pyrotechnical performances.

FIRELOCKS. A common name for the Infantry Musquets, so called, from their producing fire by the action of the flint and steel. They were first brought into general use in the year 1690.

The length of the Stock is four feet ten inches, the barrel three feet six inches, the bayonet seventeen inches, the total length six feet three inches, the total weight eleven pounds four ounces and a half, and the calibre ⚫76 in.

FISSURE. A cleft, a narrow chasm where a breach has been made.

FLAGS OF TRUCE, are frequently sent by an Enemy with a design of gaining intelligence, or of reconnoitring the Army and its Outposts. Every precaution should therefore be adopted to frustrate such intentions. The Flag of truce must be directed to halt at such a distance as to prevent its overlooking the Piquet posts. If it is merely the bearer of a letter, a receipt for it should be given, and the party required to depart instantly, care being taken to prevent its holding any conversation with

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