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Alone, appal'd, thus had the past
The vifionary vale-

When lo! the death-bell fmote her ear,
Sad-founding in the gale!

Just then she reach'd, with trembling step,
Her aged mother's door-
He's gone! fhe cry'd; and I fhall fee
That angel-face no more!

I feel, I feel this breaking heart
Beat high against my fide-
From her white arm down funk her head;
She fhivering figh'd, and died.

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"TURN, gentle hermit of the dale,
"And guide my lonely way,
"To where yon taper cheers the vale,
"With hofpitable ray.

By DR. GOLD S MIT H.

"For here forlorn and loft I tread,
"With fainting fteps and flow;
"Where wilds immeafurably spread,
"Seem lengthening as I go."

Reeks

D.

"Forbear

my fon," the hermit cries, "To tempt the dang❜rous gloom; "For yonder faithlefs phantom flies "To lure thee to thy doom. P

66

"Here to the houseless child of want,
My door is open still;
"And tho' my portion is but fcant,
"I give it with good will.

"Then turn to-night, and freely share
"Whate'er my cell beftows;
"My rufhy couch and frugal fare,
"My bleffing and repofe.

"No flocks that range the valley free,
"To flaughter I condemn :
"Taught by that power that pities me,
"I learn to pity them:

"But from the mountain's graffy side "A guiltless feaft I bring;

"A fcrip with herbs and fruits fupply'd, "And water from the fpring.

"Then, pilgrim, turn, thy cares forego;
"For earth-born cares are wrong:
"Man wants but little here below,
"Nor wants that little long."

Soft as the dew from heav'n defcends,
His gentle accents fell:
The modeft itranger lowly bends,
And follows to the cell.

Far in a wilderness obfcure
The lonely manfion lay;
A refuge to the neighbouring poor,
And franger's led astray.

No ftores beneath its humble thatch
Requir'd a maiter's care;
The wicket op'ning with a latch,
Receiv'd the harmless pair.

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And now when bufy crowds retire
To take their evening rest,
The hermit trimm'd his little fire,
And cheer'd his penfive guest;

And fpread his vegetable ftore,
And gayly preft, and smil'd;
And skill'd in legendary lore,
The ling'ring hour beguil❜d.

Around in fympathetic mirth

Its tricks the kitten tries;
The cricket chirups in the hearth;
The crackling faggot flies.

But nothing could a charm impart
To footh the ftranger's woe;
For grief was heavy at his heart,
And tears began to flow.

His rifing cares the hermit fpy'd, With anfw'ring care oppreft: "And whence, unhappy youth," he cry'd, "The forrows of thy breast?

"From better habitations fpurn'd,
"Reluctant doft thou rove:
"Or grieve for friendship unreturn'd,
"Or unregarded love?

"Alas the joys that fortune brings, "Are trifling and decay; "And thofe who prize the paltry things, "More trifling fill than they.

"And what is friendship but a name,
"A charm that lulls to fleep;
"A fhade that follows wealth or fame,
"And leaves the wretch to weep?

66

"Here to the houseless child of want,
My door is open still;
"And tho' my portion is but fcant,
"I give it with good will.

"Then turn to-night, and freely share
"Whate'er my cell beftows;
"My rushy couch and frugal fare,
"My bleffing and repofe.

"No flocks that range the valley free, "To flaughter I condemn : "Taught by that power that pities me, "I learn to pity them :

"But from the mountain's graffy fide "A guiltless feaft I bring; "A fcrip with herbs and fruits fupply'd, "And water from the spring.

"Then, pilgrim, turn, thy cares forego; "For earth-born cares are wrong: "Man wants but little here below, "Nor wants that little long."

Soft as the dew from heav'n defcends,
His gentle accents fell:
The modeft itranger lowly bends,
And follows to the cell.

Far in a wildernefs obfcure
The lonely manfion lay;
A refuge to the neighbouring poor,
And franger's led astrày.

No ftores beneath its humble thatch
Requir'd a master's care;

The wicket op'ning with a latch,
Receiv'd the harmless pair.

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