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scorched, blighted, blasted, and twisted him; and gave him such

m rents, such gashes, such breaches, and such shocks, that they made him groan, and reel backwards at their very first onset: And, had they been seconded, as they ought, we should never have been trou. bled hereafter with any more French-dancing bears again.

And though I will hold ten English crowns to one French crown at any time, upon any of these mastiff's heads, both Dutch and English, against any French cub whatsoever of equal size : and though I have great reason always to lament my own insolvency, in that I am not able ever to pay sufficient expressions of gratitude and thankful. ness to every one of these glorious assailants; and particularly to the Dutch, because I find, they had not so many whelps and lap-dogs amongst them, as we had; no, nor so many jackcalls neither.

Yet, after all, I beseech you, gentlemen, bear with my weak. ness, and pardon the infirmity of my judgment, if it be so, and give me leave to say, That my main bet is more especially reserved for, and fixed upon, the brave Tyrrell: A hundred to one on his head at any time? His name is Wonder, a right English mastiff, and a true. bred tarpaulin; who never gave an affront, and never brooked one; who is of such strange humility, goodness, and modesty ; and yet, at the same time, of such unparalleled courage, knowledge, and bravery, that, I protest, I have often gazed at the man in raptures of admira.

and always thought him a great blessing to this nation, if we understood him ; that is to say, at which I know all the jackcalls will grin, if we understood how to employ true virtue, true honesty, true valour, true skill, true conduct, and true merit to the best advan. tage; and if we understood how to pitch upon a man, that can, by his own private interest and repute amongst all true tarpaulins, man out a whole fleet at any time without a press.

But these, indeed, would be too many blessings wrapped up in one; and the powerful spirit of the ever-blessed Bishop Usher, still sur. viving in his grandson, would make too good an admiral for so bad an age, as this is.

Neither would I have old envious Grisle, nor any of his malicious whelps, or lap-dogs, think, that Captain Tyrrell is any ways privy to this commendation : No, good man, he would have been the only obstacle against it, if he had known it; for he is neither for praising himself, nor dispraising others.

But yet, I hope, my Lord Grisle, master whelps, and master lap. dogs, you will give me leave to speak the truth concerning your wor. ships; who was a spectator and stander-hy all the while, as well as you; especially, since you have made me, and all my countrymen, pay so dear for our standing at your special bear-baiting ; nay, me. thinks, you might out of modesty, if you had any, give us leave to speak, who are such great losers by you : And more especially, since you have brought things to such a pass, that, if we do not speak now, we must for ever hereafter hold our peace; for you have bid the last baos of matrimony between us and destruction.

Wherefore, since I neither do, nor can, speak evil of the rulers of green curs, in such an unreasonable line, a line of five or six leagues distance, at least, from the bear, the grand enemy of mankind, and from their duty of attacking him.

Therefore, to be thus unjustly restrained in spight of their cou. rage, nay, in spight of their teeth, by a company of whifilers, made the mastiffs rave, and grow almost stark-staring mad, for want of sleep and rest; but especially for want of fighting; for fighting is their meat and drink. A true tarpaulin fights only to eat, and eats only to fight again. And there were enough with them to eat up the bear; and sharpers enough in every thing else, but fighting; and more by a great many (though not by a good many) than those that devoured the great Spanish bear in 1588.

Whereupon the lioness, hearing the loud-mouthed voice of her mastiffs, both English and Dutch, speaking the same thing, and, which is strange, the same language, and both countries agreeing in the same verdict, diz. That the mastiffs were abused, curbed, and muzzled by a parcel of mongrels; therefore she roused up her royal wrath, and sent positive orders to the curs, either to permit the mastiffs to fight, or else to come presently themselves to her den in the Tower.

This royal eccho startled the spaniel, the whelps, and the lap. dogs worse, if possible, than the roaring of the bear had done before: For now, being almost nine days old in their iniquity, the whelps began to see, that there was another settled power, besides the bears.

Thus old Grisle, his whelps, and his lap-dogs, being reduced to a great streight, for fear of the lioness on one side, and of the bear on the other; and, yet, being willing to curry favour with both sides, and to keep to the convocation-rules of non-resistance of the settled power of the lioness, and of passive.obedience to the fixed power of the bear: Therefore, they craftily and cunningly resolved (as if they had been so many schoolmen, or doctors of metaphysical notions and distinctions) that they would sacredly, or, rather cur. sedly, observe a strict neutrality on both sides.

In pursuance whereof, old Grisle, in the first place, making his honours, his bows, and his profound congees to the bear; and, then, making his obeisance to the lioness, and, withal, making a shew of praying, but not fighting, for King William and Queen Mary: he hung out the bloody flag, as they use to do at the bear-garden, and proclaimed free liberty for all to fight, that had a mind to it. Fight dog, fight bear, for him, and his.

Whereupon the brave Tyrrell, the undaunted Dorrell, and several other English, and above twenty Dutch mastiffs, all as good as ever run at a bear (and, oh! that the courageous and victorious Shovel had been amongst them !) though they were before almost quite throttled, spent, and strangled by being held back so long from their sport, in such an unreasonable line, yet now took fresh courage, and broke the line, and left the mongrels behind to their due, the line ; and ran full speed forwards, and made directly at the bear with open mouths; and stared fire, and gaped smoke, and spoke thunder, and tarted thunderbolts, and hurled whirlwinds at the bear; and so

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scorched, blighted, blasted, and twisted him; and gave him such rents, such gashes, such breaches, and such shocks, that they made him groan, and reel backwards at their very first onset: And, had they been seconded, as they ought, we should never have been trou. bled hereafter with any more French-dancing bears again.

And though I will hold ten English crowns to one French crown at any time, upon any of these mastiffs heads, both Dutch and Eng. lish, against any French cub whatsoever of equal size: and though I have great reason always to lament my own insolvency, in that I am not able ever to pay sufficient expressions of gratitude and thankful. ness to every one of these glorious assailants; and particularly to the Dutch, because I find, they had not so many whelps and lap-dogs amongst them, as we had; no, nor so many jackcalls neither.

Yet, after all, I beseech you, gentlemen, bear with my weak. ness, and pardon the infirmity of my judgment, if it be so, and give me leave to say, That my main bet is more especially reserved for, and fixed upon, the brave Tyrrell: A hundred to one on his head at any time? His name is Wonder, a right English mastiff, and a true. bred tarpaulin; who never gave an affront, and never brooked one; who is of such strange humility, goodness, and modesty; and yet, at the same time, of such unparalleled courage, knowledge, and bravery, that, I protest, I have often gazed at the man in raptures of admira. tion; and always thought him a great blessing to this nation, if we understood him; that is to say, at which I know all the jackcalls will grin, if we understood how to employ true virtue, true honesty, true valour, true skill, true conduct, and true merit to the best advan. tage; and if we understood how to pitch upon a man, that can, by his own private interest and repute amongst all true tarpaulins, man out a whole fleet at any time without a press.

But these, indeed, would be too many blessings wrapped up in one; and the powerful spirit of the ever-blessed Bishop Usher, still sur. viving in his grandson, would make too good an admiral for so bad an age, as this is.

Neither would I have old envious Grisle, nor any of his malicious whelps, or lap-dogs, think, that Captain Tyrrell is any ways privy to this commendation : No, good man, he would have been the only obstacle against it, if he had known it; for he is neither for praising himself, nor dispraising others.

But yet, I hope, my Lord Grisle, master whelps, and master lapdogs, you will give me leave to speak the truth concerning your wor. ships; who was a spectator and stander-by all the while, as well as you ; especially, since you have made me, and all my countrymen, pay so dear for our standing at your special bear-baiting ; nay, me. thinks, you might out of modesty, if you had any, give us leave to speak, who are such great losers by you : And more especially, since you have brought things to such a pass, that, if we do not speak now, we must for ever hereafter hold our peace; for you have bid the last baos of matrimony between us and destruction.

Wherefore, since I neither do, nor can, speak evil of the rulers of and in whom, I know nothing but good: And since our blessed Sa. viour called those men dogs, that eat up the children's bread : And since you, gentlemen whelps, and gentlemen lap-dogs, have given a pretty good stroke already to our daily bread; and are preparing, not only to devour the remainder, but also to rob us of the bread of life; and to bring in the abomination of desolation upon us, even that abomination, which maketh desolate now at this very day in Flanders, Savoy, and all the frontiers of the Empire, &c. and would willingly do the like here amongst us, with all his heart; and so, I perceive, with all yours too: And since you have only the name, the salary, the sash, the cravat.string, the feather, the red, and the blue of commanders ; without the true heart, the spirit, the experience, the honesty, and the bravery of true English tarpaulins; And since you have acquitted old Grisle for his ill service, and have gnarled and snapped at my dearly beloved Wonder, and his wonder. fully courageous brethren's heels, for their good service: Therefore I will take upon me the boldness, whether you give me leave or no, to tell you, in plain English, without any mixture of French in it, That you are a pack of curs and mongrels; and ought to be turned off, and cashiered, every one of you; for there is none amongst you all, though you very well deserve it, that is worth hanging.

A

DESCRIPTION

OF THE

MOST GLORIOUS AND MOST MAGNIFICENT ARCHES

ERECTED AT THE HAGUE,

FOR THE RECEPTION OF

WILLIAM THE THIRD, KING OF GREAT BRITAIN,
With all the Motto's and Latin Inscriptions that were written upon

every one of the said Arches.

TRANSLATED INTO ENGLISH FROM THE DUTCH. London: printed for F. S. and are to be sold by Richard Baldwin, at the Oxford Arms in Warwick Lane, 1691. Folio, containing 8 pages.

His Majesty William the Third of Great Britain, having made his voyage into Holland, and being arrived at the Hague, the most no. ble and most high the Estates of Holland and West Friesland, as well as the honourable magistrates of the Hague, gave orders to pre. pare for a reception correspondent to the majesty of so glorious and so excellent a monarch. To which purpose their high and mighty lordships, among other things, have erected one triumphal arch, and

!

the magistrates two more, to be set, one in the Piazza, called Buyton. Hoff, the other in the public Piazza, and the third in the market-place of the Hague; the figure and structure of which, together with the Latin inscriptions which adorn them, are as follow.

That which was set up at the Buyton.Hoff was a triumphal arch, of a most curious Italian architecture, the order compounded dorick, having three open gates, that of the middle being the highest of all, supported backwards and forwards upon eight pillars, underneath upon large basements, separated from the body of the work.

Upon every one of those basements, stand two of the said pil. lars, with a cupolo of eight faces upon the said overture : In the middle of which cupolo appears a pedestal, upon which is represented his majesty on horseback, both figures costly gilded. To the horses, on each side are tied two slaves, or statues, of a brass colour, prostrate and groveling, and the whole work is co. loured, as if it were of free-stone ; between the pillars, and upon each side, inward and outward, the spaces are filled with pictures, comprehending some historical representation, and hieroglyphical figure, relating to the life and glorious actions of his majesty. At the frontispiece of that stately arch, and upon the fore-mentioned pillars, as well backwards as forwards, and at each side are placed, in the same order, eight statues of both sexes together, to the heighth and bigness of the life. In that part of the arch, which faceth the end of the town, upon a very high pedestal, set above all, on both sides of the round pieces that cover the work, is erected a Neptune, lying down with his trident in his hand, with this motto underneath:

Triumphet in Undis. Let him triumph upon the seas.

At the other side of the arch that looks towards the street, com. monly called Cingel, upon a like pedestal, a ploughman with a spade in his hand, with this motto underneath,

Attingat solium Joris. Let him reach to Jupiter's throne.
Round about the cupolo is written the following inscription :

Pio, felici, inclyto, Gulielmo Tertio, triumphanti patriæ patri, Gubernatori, P. C. I. P. restauratori Belgii fæderati, liberatori Angliæ, servatori Scotiæ, pacificatori Hiberniæ, reduci.

To the pious, happy, renowned William the Third, the triumphant father of his country, governor, stadtholder, and restorer of the United Netherlands, England's liberator, Scotland's preserver, Ire. land's pacificator, now returned. · Upon the frontispiece, underneath the statues above-mentioned on the side of the Buyton-Hoff, are these following inscriptions:

In the first place, Post maximas res domi forisque gestas, arctissimo cum principi. 'bus icto fædere, suorum vindex, defensor oppressorum.'

After great things done at home and abroad, as having made a strict league with the princes, the revenger of his subjects wrongs, and de.

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