Oldalképek
PDF
ePub

that brought him to the country-man's house, and went a-board the shallop again, to land upon the firm continent; but then he met with new difficulties, for the small vessel could not get near the shore for the ice; so tha two seamen were forced to take the king in their arms, and carry him to the shallop: At last, his majesty, with our whole fleet of tenders, (the men of war returning for England) ar. rived at a place called Orangie Poldar; here his majesty was com. plimented by the Prince of Nassau Sarbrach, camp-marshal, the Count of Berka, the emperor's extraordinary envoy, Monsieur Ca. tonna, the Spanish ambassador, the deputies of the States of Hol. land, the Prince of Friezeland, Count Horn, and several other per. sons of the highest quality, who attended him to Houslaerdike. where he reposed himself for some hours. It was thought his ma, jesty would have continued here for some days, till all things were ready for the magnificent entry, they were resolved to make for him. But he told them, he desired none of those honours, well knowing that the glory of a prince does not consist in appearing, but in acting. The king therefore went the same day to the Hague, and arrived there about six in the evening, accompanied with the lords already mentioned, and surrounded with the guards of the body, And, in regard the king's coming was in a manner a kind of sur. prise, his entrance was also without any ceremony. So that all that could be done, in testimony of the publick joy, was only by some peals of cannon, and ringing the bells.

Nevertheless, the burgesses of the Hague had prepared, a long time before, for his majesty's publick entry, and had been at consi. derable charges to make a glorious appearance; and all the towns ad. joining had prepared to be present at the solemnity. In a word, all the Hollanders were willing to see the king in publick, and to assure themselves, with their own eyes, that a prince, whom they love so infinitely, and of whom the common enemy had spread so many false reports, was still alive, and returned into their provinces, which obliged the States to intreat his majesty to make a publick entry ; which he refused a long time, in that such ceremonies were but the loss of that time, which he had resolved to spend altogether in action. At length, all that they could obtain from the king was, that he would dine about a quarter of a league from the Hague, at a house of the Earl of Portland's, and return in his coach through the midst of the burgesses, ranged in files, from the court to the end of the city; which was done on Thursday, February the twenty-second, about four of the clock in the afternoon, to the inexpressible satisa faction of the people, all the inhabitants of the towns round about being got together; and perhaps there never was seen at the Hague such a vast concourse of people.

I shall not spend time in describing all the particulars of this ene try, which had nothing of extraordinary magnificence, except the three triumphant arches, which surpassed, in beauty and magnifia cence, all that was ever made in France, under the reign of Lewis the Fourteenth, upon the like occasions. There you might see rea presented the principal actions of the king, in honour of whom thay were erected, accompanied with several inscriptions and devices per. fectly corresponding with the subjects to which they were applied, and which appeared to be done by the hand of a master. There you might particularly see Europe delivered from the gripes of her ra. visher; the liberty of Holland defended and preserved ; that of Eng. land restored; Ireland subdued; and the Protestant religion main. tained. The whole ceremony ended in the evening with fire-works in several places of the city, several peals of cannon, and vollies of small shot discharged, as well by the burgesses, as by the regi. ment of Trison which was in arms, with bonfires and fire-works, be. fore the court. After all was over, they still continued giving several testimonies of their satisfaction to see once more a prince so highly beloved by the Hollanders; and, in regard the whole proceeded from a sincere affection, there is a great probability that these rejoicings will long endure.

On the other side, the king manifested an extraordinary goodness and affability to all societies, and private persons that came to kiss his hands. Admiral Trump was one of this number, and his majesty honoured him with the command of the Holland fleet for this sum. mer's expedition: which was no sooner spread about the country, but you might sensibly perceive an augmentation of joy among the Hol. landers, for the king's coming. His coach was environed with crouds of people that followed him where ever he went; and by a thousand acclamations testified their satisfaction, that William the Conqueror would command their army by land; and Trump, who justly may be called a second Neptune, was to command their fleet by sea. And here, for the present, I shall break off my relations of the transac. tions at the Hague, and divert the reader with my observations on the place,

Sect II, Containing a Description of the Hague. Tuis curious village and most delightful place, the residence of that august senate, which has been, as it were, the arbiter of peace and war to all Europe, whose charms are so great, its buildings so stately and magnificent, and its streets so large, its shades so sweet, its inhabitants so civil, and so good.natured, that one may call it the 6 Delight of the world. It hath three very pretty and delightful mea. dows on the side of Delph, and mountains of sand on the other side, to cover it from the rage of the ocean, which is not above half a league distant from it; at the end of which is the small village called Scheve. ling, which is inhabited chiefly with fishermen, where is a curious hard sandy shore, admirably contrived by nature, for the divertise. ment of persons of quality, and here, in the summer time, the states, foreign ambassadors, and their ladies, &c. in their coaches and six horses, ride on the sands for several leagues. The road from the Hague to this village. is a late made way, cut through vast deep mountains of sand, payed through with curious stone, a work fit for the ancient Romans,

that brought him to the country-man's house, and went a-board the shallop again, to land upon the firm continent; but then he met with new difficulties, for the small vessel could not get near the shore for the ice; so that two seamen were forced to take the king in their arms, and carry him to the shallop: At last, his majesty, with our whole fleet of tenders, (the men of war returning for England) ar. rived at a place called Orangie Poldar; here his majesty was complimented by the Prince of Nassau Sarbrach, camp-marshal, the Count of Berka, the emperor's extraordinary envoy, Monsieur Ca. tonna, the Spanish ambassador, the deputies of the States of Hol. land, the Prince of Friezeland, Count Horn, and several other per. sons of the highest quality, who attended him to Houslaerdike. where he reposed himself for some hours. It was thought his ma, jesty would have contioued here for some days, till all things were ready for the magnificent entry, they were resolved to make for him. But he told them, he desired none of those honours, well knowing that the glory of a prince does not consist in appearing, but in acting. The king therefore went the same day to the Hague, and arrived there about six in the evening, accompanied with the lords already mentioned, and surrounded with the guards of the body. And, in regard the king's coming was in a manner a kind of sur. prise, his entrance was also without any ceremony.

So that all that could be done, in testimony of the publick joy, was only by some peals of cannon, and ringing the bells.

Nevertheless, the burgesses of the Hague had prepared, a long time before, for his majesty's publick entry, and had been at consi. derable charges to make a glorious appearance; and all the towns ad. joining had prepared to be present at the solemnity. In a word, all the Hollanders were willing to see the king in publick, and to assure themselves, with their own eyes, that a prince, whom they love so infinitely, and of whom the common enemy had spread so many false reports, was still alive, and returned into their provinces, which obliged the States to intreat his majesty to make a publick entry; which he refused a long time, in that such ceremonies were but the loss of that time, which he had resolved to spend altogether in ac. tion. At length, all that they could obtain from the king was, that he would dine about a quarter of a league from the Hague, at a house of the Earl of Portland's, and return in his coach through the midst of the burgesses, ranged in files, from the court to the end of the city; which was done on Thursday, February the twenty-second, about four of the clock in the afternoon, to the inexpressible satisa faction of the people, all the inhabitants of the towns round about being got together; and perhaps there never was seen at the Hague such a vast concourse of people.

I shall not spend time in describing all the particulars of this ene try, which had nothing of extraordinary magnificence, except the three triumphant arches, which surpassed, in beauty and magnific cence, all that was ever made in France, under the reign of Lewis the Fourteenth, upon the like occasions. There you might see rea presented the principal actions of the king, in honour of whom thay of the nobles, and the pleasure of converse, the Hague is one of the prettiest courts, and the most agreeable in the universe.

SECT. III. Some further Relation on the Affairs and Transactions at the

Hague. AFTER the king came to the Hague, few days past without the ar. rival of some princes, or other considerable persons, as well to have the honour to wait upon his majesty, as to confer with him about the present affairs. It is true that most of the princes came incognito, as well to avoid the disputes of precedency, as to confer more familiarly together, and without the pesterment of formalities. The elector of Brandenburgh, who lay at Cleves for some time, in expectation of the king's coming, no sooner heard of his arrival by the couriers that were forthwith dispatched to give him notice thereof, but he hastened to the Hague, where he arrived incognito, the twenty-fourth of January. The Duke of Wirtembergh, prince regent, during the minority of the heir, and the prince his brother arrived the twenty-ninth, and were admitted to the king a little time after. The Count of Windisgrats, from the emperor, arrived, February the fourth, and was immediately admitted to the king. The Duke of Bavaria arrived the sixth, about ten of the clock at night, and went to wait upon the king the next day, about four o'clock in the afternoon, with whom he had a confer. ence of two hours long. The Marquis of Castanaga, governor of the Spanish Netherlands, arrived the next day with a jolly train, of which, however, but one part appeared, because the princes were incognito. The Landgrave of Hesse.Cassel arrived the eleventh, accompanied by the Count of Lippe, the Baron of Gars, and several other lords. The Prince of Commerci, general of the imperial forces, arrived the fif. teenth. The Duke, and one Prince of Courland, arrived the next day. The king regaled the greatest part of these princes, and was also pleased to accept of entertainments at some of their houses. It would be too long to make a recital of all these feasts, I shall only therefore mention two, to shew what are the principal ceremonies ob: served upon such occasions.

His majesty gave an entertainment to the Elector of Branden, burgh, the third of February, at his house in the wood. The king had an hour's conference with the elector, which being ended, they en. tered into a spacious dining-room, where was a table and cloth laid, with one only single vermeil furniture (consisting of the gold plate, fine napkins, knife, fork, and spoon) and an elbow-chair, where the king sat down. After that, a chair was brought for the elector, with a white sattin cushion, and a vermeil furniture laid him, like the king's, Then the king commanded seats and furnitures to be brought for all the rest of the lords that were present, who were placed in this order: The elector on the king's right hand; next to whom sat the Duke of Ormond, the Earl of Scarborough, Monsieur Colbar, and Monsieur Dankelman: The Earl of Portland sat at the lower end of the table, just opposite to the king; the Duke of Norfolk on the king's left

a

a

a

That side, which looks to Leyden, hath a very pretty and large wood, with curions walks and groves, of oak, elm, and lime-trees, where there is a park stored with variety of deer. The inhabitants take the air there in the summer season, with a divertisement cipable to render them envied even among the gods: moved by this, h t the pretty ladies take their pleasure, without fear of the fabulous plun. der, so much celebrated by the Greeks, whereby possibly they some. times make them real and veritable.

The counts of Holland frequently kept their courts in this palace, chiefly moved thereunto, by the pleasantness of the place, and its commodious situation for hunting; our king (when Prince of Orang ) kept his court at this place, where he has a most stately palace, the back part of which, with the great hall, sufficiently testify its antiquity. There is on the side of it a great square, in which place, on the side of the Levant, are three magnificent lodgments, built a few years since; the Doeles make the corner, whereof his present ma. jesty, they say, laid the first stone: over-against the other corner, is another palace, built by Prince Maurice of Nassau, in which aré to be seen the pourtraitures of all the kings in Europe, with many euriosities brought from America. The Voorhant frontispiece, as well as the houses that face the court on the side of the Vivier, make by far the pleasantest quarter of the Hague, by reason of the largeness and spaciousness of the streets, and the number of trees that are planted there; you may see great numbers of persons of quality of both sexes resort thither in the evening, some in their coaches, and some on foot. The cloister of the Jacobines, which was built on the said Voorhant, at this day still retains the name of the Church of the Cloister.

There is another church, built much after the form of the theatre in Oxon, and is so admirable a piece of architecture without, that none within the Seven Provinces (or scarce in the world) is comparable to it; there are no pillars within, so that the minister may be seen, in every place of the church, by thousands of people without any impediment. The counts of Holland's chapel, which is in the court, is at this day a church for the French refugees; there are two pretty places like squares, the one before, and the other behind the court, where all the houses resemble those of princes.

The States of Holland reside here, as well the counsellors of the provincial court, as of the grand council. The cities of Holland have built here very magnificent houses for their deputies, of which in my opinion that of Leyden is one of the best situated, and next the court. The ambassadors of princes, the states allies, have their residence here. The Groote Kirck, or great church, is very fine, the midst of which is to be seen the arms of the famous knights, the order of Toyson d'ore, which plainly shows, that they there cele, brated the feast of the said Toyson: The tower is very high, and its form is quadrangular, built with bricks, which may be seen at a vast distance: In fine, this place is, at all times, so well inhabited by gentry, and persons of the greatest quality, that, if we consider its splendor, the magnificence of its buildings and streets, the afluence

in

« ElőzőTovább »