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him, and that Martinet desired him to return as soon as possible, giving him half a pistole to drink, saying, that, if he got a good answer of some money business he had written about, he, the deponent, should be well paid.'

Martinet briskly denied that he ever had seen this witness, or had been in company with Reolands but once in his life, about six years ago. The evidence, immediately in open court, required two men, whom he knew, to declare, if they did not several times see his master Reolands and Martinet together at the Maurice Head tavern in Sluys; who upon oath declared they had often seen them both go into, and come out from that tavern, they two all alone, and that within less than these two months. Notwithstanding all which, Martinet stood firmly to his denial.

At length the declaration and confession of his accomplice Reolands was read before him, whereat he seemed to be much stunned, having often changed colour, the time of the reading it. But, in. sisting in his denial, and the law not allowing the confession of one accomplice to be sufficient proof, he was adjudged to be put to the torture. Whereupon all things being ready for it, his courage failed him, and he told the people appointed to put it in execution, that he would confess all he knew of the affair he was charged with, be. fore the judges.

Being thereupon called into court, he freely confessed, His being upon a plot with Reolands to deliver up the town of Sluys to the French, after the manner contained in Keolands's confession, with this particular circumstance, that in a letter, written to him by Monsieur de Terry, secretary of war under the Duke of Luxemburgh, he was promised ten-thousand livres more than was to be given to Reolands, together with a place in the presidial court of Sedan, worth three-thousand livres per annum.'

And thereafter being desired to decypher the letter written in cyphers found about Reolands's man; he freely did it in these words, as was dictated by him from the letter given him in open court.

SIR, ! We have fully concerted the manner we are to act here, in de.

livering up the town; and it rests only, that you be as ready to effectuate your part at a precise time to be appointed, which both

Mr. Reolands and I think to be most proper sometime in the ( middle of May next, because the army of the States will not be in

the field till the end of that month at soonest; you see what I venture to serve so great and generous a prince, and it is but a small part of what I would do to serve him. Be sure you, by the bearer, adjust the exact time and way of your being in a readiness to accomplish your part of the design; and I think it were time,

that some of these soldiers should be stealing in, as you know. • After receipt of yours, we will be every day making one step or

other to forward the thing: and though I doubt not but by the same bearer

you

will send the bill as you promised; so I assure I am more persuaded of the reasonableness of having a

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greater sum ready in some hand, to make use of for gaining others ( to our interest, as perhaps the affairs will require. I need not say more, but commit my fortune to your conduct, who am

Sir,
Your faithful and humble Servant,

JACOB MARTINET, Sluys, April 1, 1690.

These confessions of both Jacob Martinet and of Cornelius Reolands being again read in open court, they both of them received sentence in these words:

Forasmuch as you Jacob Martinet, and you Cornelius Reolands, are by your own confession, and other legal proofs and letters, • found guilty of holding a correspondence with Monsieur Rayon,

colonel of a French regiment in the French king's army, and with Monsieur de Terry, secretary of war under the Marshal Duke of

Laxemburgh, in order to betray the garison and town of Sluys to “the French for a sum of money, agreed to be paid by the said Mon.

sieur de Terry, to you Jacob Martinet, and to you Cornelius Reolands, for doing thereof. By which action the whole province of Holland and neighbouring provinces would have been in emi. nent hazards of being thereupon ruined by the French army i therefore the court does hereby adjudge you the said Jacob Mar, tinet, to be taken back to prison, and thence, upon the sixth of May, instant, to be drawn upon a cart to the publick market-place of this town, and there to be hanged up by the neck on a gibbet, and, being near dead, to have your bowels ripped up, and therea after, being fully dead, to have your body divided into four quarters, to be disposed of as the court shall afterwards think fit, and your

head to be severed from your body, and asfixed upon the very same gate of this town which you designed to open to

enemy. Likewise the court adjudges you the said Cornelius Reolands, to be taken back to the prison, and, upon the said sixth of this instant May, to be taken to the said market-place of this town of Sluys, and there to be hanged up by the neck upon a gibbet until you be dead. And this we give for a final sentence against you both, wishing God may shew mercy to your

According to this sentence, upon the said sixth day of May instant, the said Jacob Martinet was brought to the place of execu, tion, where he behaved himself very impenitently, and refused to speak to the people, and had the sentence executed upon him as aforesaid.

After him came Cornelius Reolands, who, both in prison, and at the place of execution, carried himself very devoutly and penitently: And, asking leave if he might speak to the people, he expressed him. self in words to this purpose, a copy whereof he had given before. hand to the sheriff' or scapen that attended him.

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him, and that Martinet desired him to return as soon as possible, giving him half a pistole to drink, saying, that, if he got a good

of some money business he had written about, he, the deponent, should be well paid.'

Martinet briskly denied that he ever had seen this witness, or had been in company with Reolands but once in his life, about six years ago. The evidence, immediately in open court, required two men, whom he knew, to declare, if they did not several times see his master Reolands and Martinet together at the Maurice Head tavern in Sluys; who upon oath declared they had often seen them both go into, and come out from that tavern, they two all alone, and that within less than these two months. Notwithstanding all which, Martinet stood firmly to his denial.

At length the declaration and confession of his accomplice Reolands was read before him, whereat he seemed to be much stunned, having often changed colour, the time of the reading it. But, in. sisting in his denial, and the law not allowing the confession of one accomplice to be sufficient proof, he was adjudged to be put to the torture. Whereupon all things being ready for it, his courage failed him, and he told the people appointed to put it in execution, that he would confess all he knew of the affair he was charged with, be. fore the judges.

Being thereupon called into court, he freely confessed, His being 6

upon a plot with Reolands to deliver up the town of Sluys to the * French, after the manner contained in Reolands's confession, with

this particular circumstance, that in a letter, written to him by Monsieur de Terry, secretary of war under the Duke of Lux. emburgh, he was promised ten-thousand livres more than was to be given to Reolands, together with a place in the presidial

court of Sedan, worth three-thousand livres per annum. And thereafter being desired to decypher the letter written in cyphers found about Reolands's man; he freely did it in these words, as was dictated by him from the letter given him in open court.

SIR,

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6 We have fully concerted the manner we are to act here, in de.

livering up the town; and it rests only, that you be as ready to

effectuate your part at a precise time to be appointed, which both " Mr. Reolands and I think to be most proper sometime in the ( middle of May next, because the army of the States will not be in

the field till the end of that month at soonest; you see what I venture to serve so great and generous a prince, and it is but a small part of what I would do to serve him. Be sure you, by the bearer, adjust the exact time and way of your being in a readiness to accomplish your part of the design; and I think it were time, that some of these soldiers should be stealing in, as you know. After receipt of yours, we will be every day making one step or other to forward the thing: and though I doubt not but by the same bearer you will send the bill as you promised; so I assure you, I am more persuaded of the reasonableness of having a

A DIALOGUE

BETWEEN FRANCISCO AND AURELIA,

TWO UNFORTUNATE ORPHANS

OF THE

CITY OF LONDON. Licensed, November 4, 1690. London, printed for Randal Taylor, near Stationer's-Hall, 1690. Quarto, containing eight pages.

Guildhall, Nov. 3. 1690.

Francisco. A Good morning to you, madam :- -You are an early riser,

I see; though I as little suspected to meet you here, as to find a quaker behind the scenes in the play-house.

Aurelia. Why, sir, think you that young women have no business in Guildhall ?

Franc. Yes, madam, but hardly so early in a morning. Had it been the fourteenth of February, I should have suspected you came hither to select one of the aldermen for

your Valentine. Aurel. You are pleased to be merry, sir :---What merits have I to deserve an alderman?

Franc. You cloud your own worth by your singular modeșty; it is well known, that some, who have worn the purple, have taken their cook-maids into the bed with them; and, I hope, madam, their deserts ought not to be named with yours.

Aurel. You seem to be better acquainted with me, than I am with myself; but, sir, I hope you have not so ill an opinion of our sex in general, or of me in particular, to think that, in affairs of that nature, women are used to make the first advances.

Franc. Yes; in a little foolish gallantry, like this, a lady may go a great way, before she treads upon the heels of modesty.

durel. Yes, and that little foolish gallantry, as you are pleased to name it, shall be called fondness on our part; for it is the admirable temper of most of your sex, if you observe any thing in a woman's conversation, which you can interpret to your advantage, the nearer you find her approaches, the farther you fly from her, and tell it in company over a bottle- -The truth of it is, Jack, I could love Mrs. such an one, but she is so coming, that

Franc. No more, no more, good madam.

Aurel. Yes, one word more, and then as silent as you please. Modesty on our part serves to whet and heighten your desires; for it is a virtue of such reputation, that, where you cannot find the ori. ginal, you dote upon the copy. Witness the truth of what I say, in the conduct of the lewdest women of the town, whose counterfeit vir. tue allures you to an intrigue, whereas an open declaration of their in. famous way of living would frighten you from an amour,

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Franc. But, in this discourse of modesty and intrigue, we have lost our alderman.

Aurel. What have I done, that I should be haunted with alder. men ? You are not so ill a philosopher, as not to know, that content and happiness are not always the attendants on a plentiful fortune; which I am neither so vain to wish, nor have merits to deserve, how. ever some of my sex may be pleased with the title of an alderman's

. Franc. Now, by this aversion of yours to an alderman, I humbly conceive, madam, you are one of the orphans of the city of London.

durel. You are much in the right, sir; and, if I mistake not, by meeting you here so often, I suppose you are one of the same un. happy number.

Franc. It is certainly so, madam; for, like the widow Blackacre, in the Plain Dealer, I am forced to sollicit my own cause.

Aurel. I come hither upon the same melancholy account, but have as much luck in the attempt, as a poor fellow, that sues for an estate in forma pauperis.

Franc. Well! there is certainly a pleasure in rehearsing one's misfortunes, especially if the person, to whom they are told, can oblige one with a like relation; please you, therefore, madam, to repose yourself upon this seat, and allow one, that is not a perfect stranger to you, a quarter of an hour's conversation, since we are fallen upon a subject that equally concerns us both.

Aurel. The pleasure of that conversation will be wholly on my part, sir,

Franc. Good madam, let us not talk as if we were in a dancingschool, but lay all compliments aside as superfluous as fine clothes at a funeral.

Aurel. The subject, I confess, is almost as melancholy; for, were our bodies in as desperate a condition as our fortunes, I fear Jesu. its powder would do us but little good.

Franc. The truth of it is, we have lived upon hope a long time... A fine, thin, cooling diet, and as necessary, in our circumstances, as water-gruel to a man troubled with an over-heated liver.

Aurel. I think we may, not improperly, call this place the land of promise, where we are treated with all the civility possible. "In. deed, madam, I think of your petition. Truly, sir, you will not fail next court.day. I profess, madam, I do not neglect your bu. siness.' And all this is nothing but ceremony and compliment, acted with so much gravity, that, on a court-day, I have satisfied myself to bave seen Mr. Bays's grand dance in the Rehearsal,

Franc. Indeed, our daily attendance is somewhat like the story of the fellow, that made love to an invisible mistress.

Aurel. But, pray, sir, give me leave to inquire of you the reasons, or occasions of the practice of putting the orphans' money into the ; chamber of London ; by what authority demanded; and whether our

deceased parents were not influenced by custom, and had a wrong notion of the matter. For, could they have foreseen what has since bappened, they would as soon have ordered their executors to have

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