Oldalképek
PDF
ePub

French government should be enough to make these unthinking Jacobites tremble at the very sound of what they so extremely wish for, the return of their idol. The very picture of France is enough to kill with the sight of it. Where the people live in cottages of straw, in a fat and fertile soil, reduced to the utmost degree of poverty; where the miserable peasant, after he has tilled his land, when he comes to reap the fruit of his labour, has nothing to feed him but the rye and barley, or a few chesnuts; nothing to drink but water squeesed through the lees of the pressed grape; the collectors of the taxes, the impost-gatherers, and other ravenous beasts of prey carry off the corn, his wine, his oil, and other choicer conveniencies of life; so innumerable are the taxes, imposts, rights of entrance, peages, aids, &c. which, if a man should reckon up, he would seem to talk the language of a conjurer; and all these so tyrannically exacted, by the numberless swarms of ruffians, publicans, and har. pies, as render one of the most delightful countries in the world a hell upon earth. Into this condition was England tumbling, till res deemed by their most sacred majesties, King William and Queen Mary; and such would England be, if these unreasonable Jacobites might have their will; which God forbid.

AN

HISTORICAL ACCOUNT

OF THE RISE AND GROWTH

OF THE

WEST-INDIA COLONIES, And of the great Advantages they are to England, in

respect to Trade.

LICENSED ACCORDING TO ORDER.

London, printed 1690. Quarto, containing fifty-three pages, beside

the title and dedication.

THE DEDICATION. To my much honoured Friend, Sir Robert Davers, Baronet, and to the rest of the Gentlemen interested and concerned in the West-Indies.

GENTLEMEN, THE following treatise was occasioned by the great and just com. plaints made by you, of the additional duty that was laid upon your product, and fell upon your labour and industry, though designed by the parliament to have been paid by the consumptioner ; at that

[ocr errors]

time, the inventions of most men were at work (especially those that had any dealing with you, and a sense of your sufferings) to con. trive a method, whereby relief might have given you, that are the best employed hands for the inriching and supporting this nation.

After much time had been spent, in endeavouring the taking off the duty, and it was found that no arguments were prevalent, and almost all people despairing of relief, then Col. Waldrond, myself, and others, with no small pains, nor little charge, contrived (as we thought) a method, that might not only have laid the duty on the consumptioner, but also might have relieved you from the complaints of those that do charge you with being great debtors, and to have enabled every planter to make the best advantage of their plantations, by supplying them with monies, at the common interest of the colonies, by preventing numerous sellers, necessitous and ignorant sales.

And that this might run through the most strict examination, before it should have been allowed of, we proposed, that his late majesty, and privy-council, might have the first view of it, that they might be satisfied it did not lessen his majesty's revenue, and that we might have his majesty's leave to propose it to the assemblies of every individual colony; and, if they did approve of it, and petitioned his majesty for the incorporating such societies, that then we, and our friends, might be interested in it.

But this, meeting with opposition, occasioned a hearing before his majesty, and the lords of his privy-council; and, after they were satisfied it did not lessen his majesty's revenue, our great debate, with the opposers, was about his majesty's giving leave for the sending of it to the colonies for them to try and examine it. His ma. jesty was pleased to declare, that he could not understand any reason could be given why they might not have a sight of it, for he thought Barbadoes best knew what Barbadoes wanted. I believe none will deny, but that it met with a general approbation of all the lords of the council, except my Lord Chancellor, of whom I was informed by a friend (but at that time an opposer of this design) that he was our enemy, and accordingly we found him.

Soon after this hearing, the government began to be uneasy, and holding it not proper for a matter of this nature, to be further pro. ceeded on, under an unsettled government, I rather chose to be silent, and bear such reflexions as were made by those that were totally ignorant of the method of our undertaking, though pre. judicial to my particular interest, than to expose it to view, before I saw the government in a temper to consider of trade, and the great benefit

you

are to this nation. Therefore, I have now exposed it for your view, that you may be judges whether it might have been, or may be serviceable to you, and whether our request of sending it to you was unreasonable. You will find, by this treatise (as I humbly conceive) that our de.

I sign would, at least, have raised the value of your goods to the price it bore before the additional duty was laid; and it was allowed at that hearing, by the opposers, that it would raise, at least, twenty per cent. Our method was, to have had all your goods, that came

French government should be enough to make these unthinking Jacobites tremble at the very sound of what they so extremely wish for, the return of their idol. The very picture of France is enough to kill with the sight of it. Where the people live in cottages of straw, in a fat and fertile soil, reduced to the utmost degree of poverty; where the miserable peasant, after he has tilled his land, when he comes to reap the fruit of his labour, has nothing to feed him but the rye and barley, or a few chesnuts; nothing to drink but water squeesed through the lees of the pressed grape; the collectors of the taxes, the impost-gatherers, and other ravenous beasts of prey carry off the corn, his wine, his oil, and other choicer conveniencies of life; so innumerable are the taxes, imposts, rights of entrance, peages, aids, &c. which, if a man should reckon up, he would seem to talk the language of a conjurer; and all these so tyrannically exacted, by the numberless swarms of ruffians, publicans, and har. pies, as render one of the most delightful countries in the world a hell upon earth. Into this condition was England tumbling, till res deemed by their most sacred majesties, King William and Queen Mary; and such would England be, if these unreasonable Jacobites might have their will; which God forbid.

AN

HISTORICAL ACCOUNT

OF THE RISE AND GROWTH

OF THE

WEST-INDIA COLONIES, And of the great Advantages they are to England, in

respect to Trade.

LICENSED ACCORDING TO ORDER,

London, printed 1690. Quarto, containing fifty-three pages, beside

the title and dedication.

THE DEDICATION. To my much honoured Friend, Sir Robert Davers, Baronet, and to the rest of the Gentlemen interested and concerned in the West-Indies.

GENTLEMEN,

The following treatise was occasioned by the great and just com. plaints made by you, of the additional duty that was laid upon your product, and fell upon your labour and industry, though designed by the parliament to have been paid by the consumptioner; at that time, the inventions of most men were at work (especially those that had any dealing with you, and a sense of your sufferings) to con. trive a method, whereby relief might have given you, that are the best employed hands for the inriching and supporting this nation.

After much time had been spent, in endeavouring the taking off the duty, and it was found that no arguments were prevalent, and almost all people despairing of relief, then Col. Waldrond, myself, and others, with no small pains, nor little charge, contrived (as we thought) a method, that might not only have laid the duty on the consumptioner, but also might have relieved you from the complaints of those that do charge you with being great debtors, and to have enabled every planter to make the best advantage of their plantations, by supplying them with monies, at the common interest of the coloa nies, by preventing numerous sellers, necessitous and ignorant sales.

And that this might run through the most strict examination, before it should have been allowed of, we proposed, that his late majesty, and privy-council, might have the first view of it, that they might be satisfied it did not lessen his majesty's revenue, and that we might have his majesty's leave to propose it to the assemblies of every individual colony; and, if they did approve of it, and pe. titioned his majesty for the incorporating such societies, that then we, and our friends, might be interested in it.

But this, meeting with opposition, occasioned a hearing before his majesty, and the lords of his privy-council; and, after they were satisfied it did not lessen his majesty's revenue, our great debate, with the opposers, was about his majesty's giving leave for the sending of it to the colonies for them to try and examine it. His ma. jesty was pleased to declare, that he could not understand any reason could be given why they might not have a sight of it, for he thought Barbadoes best knew what Barbadoes wanted. I believe none will deny, but that it met with a general approbation of all the lords of the council, except my Lord Chancellor, of whom I was informed by a friend (but at that time an opposer of this design) that he was our enemy, and accordingly we found him.

Soon after this hearing, the government began to be uneasy, and holding it not proper for a matter of this nature, to be further pro. ceeded on, under an unsettled government, I rather chose to be silent, and bear such reflexions as were made by those that were totally ignorant of the method of our undertaking, though pre. judicial to my particular interest, than to expose it to view, before I saw the government in a temper to consider of trade, and the great benefit you are to this nation.

Therefore, I have now exposed it for your view, that you may be judges whether it might have been, or may be serviceable to you, and whether our request of sending it to you was unreasonable.

You will find, by this treatise (as I humbly conceive) that our de. sign would, at least, have raised the value of your goods to the price it bore before the additional duty was laid ; and it was allowed at that hearing, by the opposers, that it would raise, at least, twenty per cent. Our method was, to have had all your goods, that came

to England, brought to one body of men, which we called a common factory, and they constantly to be chosen by you in your assem. blies, and they to have been accountable to every consigner for the net proceed of every parcel of goods sold, for which your charge was not to exceed what you now pay. The other part of our design was to erect a company, separate from the common factory, which should have sufficient funds in each colony, to lend what monies you had occasion of, you giving security on lands or goods; and, if they did not lend it, on demand, they were to forfeit to the borrower considerable for every hundred pound demanded, the lands or goods being valued by sworn appraisers. What was lent, was to be con. tinued during your pleasure, you paying your interest, when due, and you

had power to pay it in, when you pleased, and they obliged to lend too, at least, one half value of land, or goods, and you not to have been confined to have borrowed it of them, but where else you pleased; so that this company might have been serviceable, but could not have been hurtful, for they were bound to obey, and had no power to command.

To make it next to impossibility, that the government should ever be imposed on, to permit any laws or designs of any persons what. soever, let their pretences be ever so specious, to take effect, until the colonies, by their assembly, were consulted with: I have, to the best of my knowledge, given a true and just account of what im. port you are to this nation, by increasing of navigation, consuming the woollen-manufactory, of all sorts of apparel, houshold goods, &c. that are made in England ; and that which was formerly foreign com. modities, and cost us considerable yearly, by your industry, is be. come native, the nation freed from that charge, and the consumptioner saves, at least, one half of his expence, for the like quantity; besides the great advantage this nation receives by your goods ex. ported, being over and above our consumption; and, lastly, all the riches you get in the Indies, by your great care, labour, and industry, is brought to England, and here it centers.

If you will be pleased to rectify my errors, that I through igno. rance may have committed, that our legislators may be more fully satisfied, that you are, and ever must be Englishmen, and that you are much more beneficially employed there, for the benefit of this nation, than any the like number in England; that every hardship that is put upon you, that makes your goods dearer in foreign markets, or lessens the consumption in England, is a lessening to the trade of England, and, consequently, prejudicial to every subject in England: and, if this small treatise meets with your

kind acceptance, I shall think myself very happy, and shall always be ready to demon. strate, that I am your well wisher, and, Gentlemen, Your most humble and faithful Servant,

DALBY THOMAS.

« ElőzőTovább »