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nant of Enguien, and nine soldiers were slain, and six or seren wounded.

The morrow, being the 12th, the other batteries were finished, and thirty-eight pieces of cannon, and fifteen mortar-pieces, began that day to play continually. The same day about noon, a cannonbullet of the besieged's set on fire thirty bombs of the besiegers, which were on the Sieur de Vigoy's first battery : seven gunners and two soldiers were killed, and there were six grievously wounded. The Sieur de Caillemote, second son of the Marquis de Ruvigny, was wounded in the throat with a musquet-shot.

In the evening, the Marquis de Lambert, lieutenant-general, the Sieur de Rubantel, and the Marquis de Crenan, relieved the general officers which were in the trenches; two battalions of the marine relieved the post on the right hand, and two battalions of the queen's relieved the post on the left. During the night the besiegers lodged themselves on the causey of the covered way; and there was a com. munication made from one lodgment to the other. The work was carried on at the attack of Bonnevoye, within thirty paces of the ditch, on the side of the gate of Thionville, where a battery of five pieces was raised. At the same time we advanced five of the great battery of Paffendal, for to batter on the reverse the bastion and outworks of the great attack on the left, and to beat down the gate of Paffendal. There was opened at the attack of Gromp, within twenty paces of the ditch, a trench, parallel to the front, which has upon one and the same line four towers, and which faces the hill of Cromp: we brought down the battery which was upon this hill, with a design to beat in pieces the gate of this Fauxbourg, and so to be able to dismount two pieces which were on a plat. form within an hundred paces on the right hand of this gate, and which much incommoded the besiegers. We seized on a church, within half a musquet-shot of the place, situated upon a rising ground between Gromp and Paffendal, the enemy not making any resistance. Fifty men were left there to keep it. There was this night a serjeant killed, with about ten soldiers, and twenty wounded.

13th. In the morning, a soldier of the place came into the camp. He told us, that the Prince de Chimay had been obliged to com. mit the defence of the outworks to the townsmen, and to draw the soldiers into the town, for fear of their running away. About noon the besieged sprang two little mines under a lodg. ment we had made on the right hand, upon the causey of the first covered-way: there were three soldiers slain, and about fifteen wounded.

In the evening, the Count du Plessis, lieutenant-general, the Sicur de Gournay, marshal de camp, and the Sieur de Maumont, brigadier of foot, relieved the general officers in the trenches: á battalion of Bourbonnois, one of Humieres, one of the Crown, and one of Languedoc, relieved those which were at the great attack, The Marquis de Humieres, only son to the Marshal de Humieres, was slain by a musquet.shot, which hit him in the head. About midnight, four parties of grenadiers, of ten men

each, had order to enter at the same time, by four several places, into the first covered way, to settle themselves therein, if they found not too great resistance; and to seize on a redoubt, called the Redoubt of St. Mary, which is between the two covered-ways: but, after they had borne a violent charge of musquets, grenadoes, and fire-works, they were forced to retreat, because this redoubt was revested in the same manner as the ditch, wherein there was a caponiere filled with musqueteers, and because there was no getting into it but by a gallery under ground, the end whereof joined to covered-way nearest the place.

Thus were we obliged to proceed along by digging as far as the palisadoes, whence we carried on a lodgment in the covered-way, which the besiegers extended on the right and left of the bottom of the ditch of the redoubt; and the miners, to overthrow it, wrought under the ditch. At the attack on the left, our men lodged them. selves on the causey of the covered-way, whence was a communication made to the lodgment on the right. A lieutenant of the royal regiment was killed, with three serjeants, nine or ten soldiers, and five cannoniers; and a captain with about twenty soldiers wounded.

In the evening, the posts of the trenches were relieved by the Marquis de Genlis, Lieutenant-general, the Marquis d'Uxelles, Marshal de Camp, and the Duke de la Ferte, brigadier of foot, with two battalions of Champagne, that of la Ferte, and one of Orleans. There was finished, on the right-hand of the great at. tack, the lodgment in the covered way, upon the brink of the ditch of the redoubt, where the miners could not easily go on, be. cause of the rock they there met with. We brought on two pieces of cannon, endeavouring to break the communication of the redoubt with the second covered-way. On the lefthand of the attack, was sent forth a detachment of grenadiers of la Ferte, to see if the ene.

a mies had quitted the first covered-way on that side. They could not come to know it, because the enemies were there couched on their bellies, and, at the appearance of our men, rose, and oliged them to retire: ten of the grenadiers were slain, and two mortally wounded; the captain had his arm broken, and the sub-lieutenant was wounded: the Marquis de Genlis's aid-de-camp received a mortal wound, and two officers of Orleans were slightly wounded.

15th. Three fugitives from the place related, that the governor of the town, the Prince de Chimay, was that night wounded in the leg, and that the major was killed. That day we advanced two batteries, each of two pieces of cannon, for to batter a redoubt, which is near the two covered-ways on the left; and, in the mean time, we played the most advantageously we could from the batteries that were in condition, for to ruin the outworks and defences of the bastion on the same side: we seized also two redoubts on the back. side of Paffendal, which the cannon of the besiegers had very much damaged.

In the evening the guard of the trenches was relieved by the Sieur de Joyeuse, the Count de Broglio, and the Sieur de Josseaux, with the two battalions of Navarre, that of Vaubecourt, and that of gallery, otwithstanding the besieged fired furiously upon us from the gate; and, after two hours fight under ground, we set up a traverse to hinder their return to the redoubt.

The enemy did also the same on their side, to stop the progress of our workmen. They had prepared four mines at the four corners of the redoubt, but they could not set them on fire, because of the water, which was in the lowest gallery.

We continued to batter a breach in the redoubt on the left, to make a mine to open the ditch, and to inclose this redoubt by mining, as we had that on the right. We made a lodgment on the backside of Paffendal, the length of the traverse, and the face of the half-moon, within four paces whereof the works were advanced. But we were constrained to quit it by the abundance of bombs, grenadoes, and fireworks, which the besieged cast from the half-moon, and the covered-way. The communication of the two attacks was made during the night, notwithstanding thirty toises of the roc were between the two lodgments.

The same day, being the 19th, four miners were set to the attack of Grondt, from the gate unto the nearest tower: and they wrought with so much diligence, that in the evening they began to charge the mines. A captain of the Queen's, and two or three inferior officers were wounded ; five or six soldiers were slain, and about twenty wounded.

19th. In the evening, the Marquis de Genlis, lieutenant-general, and the Marquis de Crenan, brigadier of foot, mounted the trenches on the right-hand with the battalions of Bourbonnois and Humieres, and the Sieur de Rubantel, marshal de camp, mounted on the left with the battalions of the Crown and Vermandois.

In the night we extended on the right the lodgment, which was upon the communication of the redoubt with the second covered-way, above five and thirty toises to the right and as much to the left. And this lodgment was in some places within twelve paces of the pali. sadoes. We perfected on the left the lodgment which was made to inclose the redoubt.

We had proceeded very slowly in battering it because we judged it not fit to finish the making a breach therein, before the miner, who was set to the exterior wall of the ditch, and who had required two days to open it, because of the rock he found there, was nearer finishing his work. There was made also a place of arms, capable to contain a thousand or twelve hundred men in the trench, which communicates with the two lodgments.

We re-established with great gabions along the traverse, as far as the point of the counterguard, the lodgmeut we had there the night be. fore, and which we had quitted in the day. The besieged cast store of bombs and grenadoes, to hinder us from re-establishing it. The Count de Gasse, colonel of the Vermandois regiment, who supported the head of the work on the left, had there twenty grenadiers killed or wounded. The enemy cast an extraordinary number of grenadoes when we were got within an halbard's length of the angle of the second counterscarp.

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were nine or ten soldiers killed, and about twenty wounded. The same night we extended, at the attack of Grondt, the lodgment all along the ditch, and brought thither a battery of three pieces. There was not any new work made on the side of the attack of Bonnevoye.

In the evening of the 17th, the Marquis de Lambert, lieutenanta general, and the Marquis de Crenan, brigadier of foot, relieved the guard of the trenches on the right, with a battalion of Normandy, and that of Soissons; and the Marquis de Renti, marshal de camp, relieved it on the left with a battalion of Lyonnois, and that of Turenne,

We continued on the right to batter the redoubt, and to work through the mine, with a design to inclose it. We perfected on the left the lodgments and communications which had been made there, and we discharged abundance of cannon and bombs, to finish the ruining the defences of the attacked side, and the palisadoes which remained on the second covered way. The besieged also fired fiercely during the night, and killed us about twenty soldiers, and wounded twenty-five or thirty, with four or five officers.

18th. In the evening, the Count du Plessis, lieutenant-general for the day, and the Marquis de Nesle, brigadier of foot, relieved the posts on the right with two battalions of the marine, and the Che. valier de Tilladet, marshal de camp, relieved the posts on the left with two battalions of the Queen's.

The redoubts of this attack are of very good stone, and every where cannon-proof. They have three stories of battlements, with a revested ditch, sixteen feet broad, and fourteen deep, in the revestment whereof are caponieres, which command round about. These redoubts have communication with the ditch of the place, and the covered-way, by three galleries under ground, built one upon another, of six feet in height, and four in breadth.

The Count du Plessis visited all the posts of the trenches. He sent to view the breach which our cannon had made in the highest story of the redoubts on the right, and to which the breaches of the mines made an ascent. We found no body there, and the Count du Plessis sent thither only six grenadiers and a serjeant, for fear there might be mines. They saw through the holes of the arches, that the enemies kept yet the lower story, and they cast grenadoes at them, but they were not sufficient to drive them away. The Count du Plessis caused bombs to be thrown at them, which yet dissipated them not, till they had had their effect, and he sent to charge them sword in hand.

At the same time, we carried on the mine-work to the galleries of communication from the redoubt to the ditch, and the covered-way of the place, and we lodged ourselves by this mining in the midst of the second causeway. The enemies, perceiving the besiegers ready to pierce the communication, were afraid to be cut off without being succoured, and retired with so much precipitation through the middle gallery into their ditch, that they left many musquets, and some hats in the redoubt.

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gallery, fiotwithstanding the besieged fired furiously upon us from the gate; and, after two hours fight under ground, we set up a traverse to hinder their return to the redoubt.

The enemy did also the same on their side, to stop the progressof our workmen. They had prepared four mines at the four corners of the redoubt, but they could not set them on fire, because of the water, which was in the lowest gallery.

We continued to batter a breach in the redoubt on the left, to make a mine to open the ditch, and to inclose this redoubt by mining, as we had that on the right. We made a lodgment on the backside of Paffendal, the length of the traverse, and the face of the half-moon, within four paces whereof the works were advanced. But we were constrained to quit it by the abundance of bombs, grenadoes, and fireworks, which the besieged cast from the half-moon, and the covered-way. The communication of the two attacks was made during the night, notwithstanding thirty toises of the rock, which were between the two lodgments.

The same day, being the 19th, four miners were set to the attack of Grondt, from the gate unto the nearest tower: and they wrought with so much diligence, that in the evening they began to charge the mines. A captain of the Queen's, and two or three inferior officers were wounded ; five or six soldiers were slain, and about twenty wounded.

19th. In the evening, the Marquis de Genlis, lieutenant-general, and the Marquis de Crenan, brigadier of foot, mounted the trenches on the right-hand with the battalions of Bourbonnois and Humieres, and the Sieur de Rubantel, marshal de camp, mounted on the left with the battalions of the Crown and Vermandois.

In the night we extended on the right the lodgment, which was upon the communication of the redoubt with the second covered-way, above five and thirty toises to the right and as much to the left. And this lodgment was in some places within twelve paces of the pali. sadoes. We perfected on the left the lodgment which was made to inclose the redoubt.

We had proceeded very slowly in battering it because we judged it not fit to finish the making a breach therein, before the miner, who was set to the exterior wall of the ditch, and who had required two days to open it, because of the rock he found there, was nearer finishing his work. There was made also a place of arms, capable to contain a thousand or twelve hundred men in the trench, which communicates with the two lodgments.

We re-established with great gabions along the traverse, as far as the point of the counterguard, the lodgmeut we had there the night be. fore, and which we had quitted in the day. The besieged cast store of bombs and grenadoes, to hinder us from re-establishing it. The Count de Gasse, colonel of the Vermandois regiment, who supported the head of the work on the left, had there twenty grenadiers killed or wounded. The enemy cast an extraordinary number of grenadoes when we were got within an halbard's length of the angle of the second counterscarp.

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