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valuable and interesting articles, among others the survey of the celebrated dairy county, Orange, will be found of very great interest. Its early history is given, showing the severe trials of its early settlers, many of whose descendants still occupy the farms which their ancestors defended in the hostile strife waged by the English and their Indian associates.

A very interesting article on the associated dairies and cheese manufactories of New York, by X. A. Willard of Little Falls, is also given.

The President, Mr. Cornell, and Mr. Johnson, the Secretary, attended the great exhibition of works of industry and art in Eondon, this year. The report of Mr. Johnson will be found full of interest to American readers, showing in the midst of the mighty conflict at home, the inventors of our country receiving a larger proportion of prizes than any other country, in one of the most extensive exbibitions ever beld.

Dr. Fitch's 8th report on insects, is given in this volume. The Executive Committee early in the season debated the question whether in the existing state of affairs in our country, it was desirable to hold the usual annual exhibition. The Committee decided to hold the exhibition, believing that the farmers and mechanics of the State would sustain the Society, and the result of the exhibition showed tbat this was the only decision that would have met the wishes of the people. The Monroe County Agricultural Society, and the citizens of Rochester, with a liberality above all praise, prepared for the exhibition, and the farmers of Western New York by thousands, appeared with their contributions to sustain the exhibition.

The receipts of the Fair amounted to $11,559.45.

In closing up my labors, I am aware that I have not done all that the work demanded. I have, however, brought together the history and proceedings of the Agricultural associations of New York, which I doubt not will be interesting to the farmers of the State..

I am indebted to the Secretary of the Society for reference to the early labors of the distinguished men of the State for the advancement of agriculture and manufactures, and have brought forward the operations of the early friends to the time (1841,) when a new and vigorous effort was made, which has been followed up so successfully as to place the New York State Agricultural Society among the most useful associations in this country. Should my labors in the brief history of your efforts be the means of extending the usefulness of your Society, I shall be greatly gratified.

At the reorganization of this Society, there were but few county organizations to promote agriculture. Now there is a flourishing society in nearly every county, while in some counties two are sustained, and town associations and farmers' clubs are very common, and found to be productive of noble results. How far the State Society has been instrumental in establishing and encouraging these minor associations, we cannot venture a conjecture, but by holding its fairs in autumn in different parts of the State in different years, and by its attractive winter meetings and exhibitions at the capitol of the State, where legislation naturally convenes representatives from every neighborhood, an influence must be extended over the State, which cannot be over estimated. The reports of these county and town societies, as published in the Transactions, tell in language plain and unmistakable, that the farmers of the State are awake to the honor and interest of their calling.

The Transactions of the Society, published yearly, and liberally distributed among the people, either as premiums or in other ways, accomplish much through their addresses, their able essays, with which nearly every volume is liberally provideg; their lectures, statistics and reports, must be doing a matchless work in hiding the Society in carrying out its grand programme of improving the mind and the soil, of introducing better cultivation, new and valuable crops, better herds and flocks, better buildings, and roads, and schools; in short, better everything. Their influence is by no means restricted to the State. The people of each State seek for these transactions with eagerness. Their influence is world-wide. They are sought for, and read and admired by the people of all lands.

Blest as the State of New York is in extent of territory, its climate softened in the interior by its many lakes, its variety of soil adapted to all purposes of cultivation that a temperate and cooler cultivation may require; her sons stimulated by every inducement that the natural fertility of her soil and improved management can give, what is not to be expected of the greatness and the glory of her future agriculture? Will she not one day sit as a queen among the sister States, and say to thein, come, see how fertility smiles all over our domain, under our thorough course of cultivation, it fills our valleys with the finest wheat and the golden corn; it has clothed our hills and our mountain sides with the richest herbage; our herds and flocks feed in choicest pasture, filled to abundance; the choicest, richest fruits drop in all our paths. And then shall a generation fill the earth who will venerate the name and admire the labors of Livingston and his worthy co-workers in the last century, and of Buel, Van Rensselaer, Delafield, Beekman, and a great host of others now living, who in dark and discouraging hours have toiled, patiently and hopefully toiled on, to bring this Society through the feebleness of its infancy, the inexperience of its growth to the strength of its manhood, and who may now safely rejoice in the rich promise it gives for its mature years.

WA. BACON.

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Luther Tucker.

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Luther Tucker.
Joel B. Nott.
B. P. Johnson.

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Syracuse
Albany
Rochester.
Poughkeepsie
Utica .........
Auburn.......
Saratoga.
Buffalo
Syracuse
Albany
Rochester.....
Utica
Saratoga.
New York.
Elmira
Watertown
Buffalo
Syracuse
Albany
Elmira.....
Watertown
Rochester
Utica .......

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1841
1842
1843
1844
1845
1846
1847
1848
1849
1850
1851
1852
1853
1854
1855
1856
1857
1858
1859
1860
1861
1862
1863

September 29, 30

do 27, 28, 29.
do 19, 20, 21.
do 17, 18, 19.
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16, 17, 18, 19
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September 30-October 1, 2,
October 6, 7, 8, 9

do 5, 6, 7, 8
do 4, 5, 6, 7

do 2, 3, 4, 5 September 17, 18, 19, 20.

do 30-October 1, 2, 3 do 15, 16, 17, 18

$1,707 87
1,473 22
1,756 79
1,142 00

940 00
1,105 00
1,735 97
1,917 25
1,793 28
1,590 00
2,179 53
1,147 06
1,190 38

204 75

$349 00

876 70
2,479 88
3,723 80
4,450 18
4,530 17
4,187 22
6,417 80
8,287 55
10,855 61
12,396 25
8,336 16
6,411 39
9,538 70
11,527 25

8,536 00
15,585 34
. 10,970 28
18,819 33
9,345 95
8,018 40
11,559 45
11,619 78

Joel B. Nott
James S. Wadsworth

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B. P. Johnson.....
Jno. M. Sherwood.
George Vail......
Lewis F. Allen.....
John A. King
Ezra P. Prentico
Job Delafield
Henry Wager
Lewis G. Morris.
William Kelly
Samuel Cheever,
Theodore S. Faxton.
Alonzo S. Upham ........
William T. MoCoun
A. B. Conger...
B. N. Huntington
George Geddes
Ezra Cornell
Edward G. Faile

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1,300 00
2,500 00
3,290 73
2,940 00
3,031 80
2,511 12
2,008 69
2,161 67

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EXTRACTS FROM THE REPORT OF THE NEW YORK

STATE CHEESE MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIA-
TION, ORGANIZED JANUARY 7, 1864.

[This report baving been prepared previous to the expiration of our agricultural year, is included in the report for 1863.]

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OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION. President-Geo. Williams, Oneida county.

Vice-Presidents-Seth Miller, Lewis county; David Hamlin, Jefferson county; A. L. Fish, Herkimer county; George L. Morse, Madison county; Moses Kinney, Cortland county.

Treasurer-L. R. Lyon, Lewis county.
Secretary-William H. Comstock, Utica, Oneida county.

NOTICE. In presenting to the members of this association this report, I am instructed by the executive board to say that the report is not quite as full and useful as it was our desire to present to you. We neither had sufficient time nor sufficient finances to make up as full and large a report, with engravings accompanying, as the growing interest in cheese-making seems to demand.

After due consultation, we have embodied four plates, which we think may be of some interest to many of our members. We might have made some new engravings that perhaps would be more useful and instructive, had our finances permitted us so to do. These engravings were obtained through the kindness of B. P. Johnson, Corresponding Secretary N. Y. State Agricultural Society. If every member will answer carefully and accurately the questions sent to them, we will next winter be able to publish a book upon this subject worthy of the enterprise, and worth keeping as a text-book upon cheese-making.

I would suggest, in comparing the different reports from cheese factories, we should try to ascertain the condition of the land on which the cows were kept, as it is well known that dry, rich land will yield better milk than wet, sour land; and that in one section where there is a dronth (as was the case this year in the northern part of this State), more cheese can be made from the same quantity of milk. That we may be better prepared to understand these facts in our next report, we have tried to embody in our questions that which will, if fully answered, enable any one to see at a glance the kind of land the cows live upon, and the condition of the season. I trust every member will have a full report of this season's operations before we have our next annual meeting, and send their report to

me.

Our next annual meeting will be held at Utica, the second Wednesday of January, 1865.

WM. H. COMSTOCK, Secretary. ARTICLES OF ASSOCIATION. WHEREAS, it is deemed expedient to organize an association through which, as a medium, results of the practical experience of dairymen may be gathered and disseminated to the dairying community; therefore,

Resolved, That we, the undersigned, do hereby associate ourselves together for mutual improvement in the science of cheese-making, and more efficient action in promoting the general interests of the dairying community.

Article I. The name of the organization shall be the New York State CHEESE MANUFACTURERS' Association.

Article II. The officers of the association shall consist of a president, five vice-presidents, secretary and treasurer.

Article III. The president, vice-presidents, secretary and treasurer shall constitute the executive board of the association.

Artide IV. The officers of the association shall be elected at the regular annual meeting, and shall retain their offices until their successors are chosen.

Article V. The regular annual meeting shall occur on the second Wednesday in January of each year, and at such place as the executive board shall designate.

Article VI. Any person may become a member of the association, and be entitled to all its benefits, by the annual payment of one dollar.

PROCEEDINGS OF THE CONVENTION. The convention, called by over forty prominent manufacturers in Central New York-the first of the kind ever held in the United States, and probably in the world-assembled at the court house in Rome on the 6th of January. The court room was nearly filled with the intelligent and practical men interested in the proceedings, when the convention was called to order, and Col. Seth Miller, of Constableville, Lewis county, appointed temporary chairman; and Messrs. George W. Pixley, of Kirkland, Oneida county, and B. F. Stevens, of Lowville, Lewis county, were appointed temporary secretaries. The call was then read, after which the chairman appointed a committee on permanent organization. Adjourned until two o'clock P. u.

AFTERNOON Session. The audience was largely increased, many being unable to find seats. Representatives were present from sixty-nine cheese factories, with from 150 to 1,000 cows each, as follows: Location-County.

No. factories. No. cows.
Oneida

15,003
Madison............

6,650 Herkimer

2,420 Lewis

2,897 Chautauqua

1,700 Chepango..

1,300 Cortland.

2,710
Oswego.

1,150
Fulton
Montgomery
Erie....

1,000
Jefferson...
Warren, Mass..

500 36,752

32
10
5
5
3

3
3
1
1
1
1

600
600

220

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