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A Grey Friar staid upon the grave,

And sang till the morning tide, And a friar shall sing for Barthram's soul, While Headless Cross shall bide.

SURTEES.

To the Cuckoo
O BLITHE New-comer! I have heard,

I hear thee and rejoice.
O Cuckoo ! shall I call thee Bird,

Or but a wandering Voice ?
While I am lying on the grass

Thy twofold shout I hear, From hill to hill it seems to pass,

At once far off, and near. Though babbling only to the Vale,

Of sunshine and of flowers, Thou bringest unto me a tale

Of visionary hours.
Thrice welcome, darling of the Spring!

Even yet thou art to me
No bird, but an invisible thing,

A voice, a mystery ;
The same whom in my schoolboy days

I listened to; that Cry
Which made me look a thousand ways

In bush, and tree, and sky.
To seek thee did I often rove

Through woods and on the green ; And thou wert still a hope, a love ;

Still longed for, never seen. And I can listen to thee yet ;

Can lie upon the plain
And listen, till I do beget

That golden time again.
O blessed Bird ! the earth we pace

Again appears to be
An unsubstantial, faery place :
That is fit home for Thee !

WORDSWORTH.

Helen of Kirkconnel

I wish I were where Helen lies !
Night and day on me she cries;
O that I were where Helen lies,

On fair Kirkconnel Lee !
Curst be the heart that thought the thought
And curst the hand, that fired the shot,
When in my arms burd Helen dropt,

And died to succour me !
O think na ye my heart was sair,
When my love dropt down and spak nae mair!
There did she swoon wi' meikle care,

On fair Kirkconnel Lee.
As I went down the water side,
None but my foe to be my guide,
None but my foe to be my guide,

On fair Kirkconnel Lee.
I lighted down, my sword did draw,
I hacked him into pieces sma',
I hacked him into pieces sma',

For her sake that died for me.
O Helen fair, beyond compare !
I'll make a garland of thy hair,
Shall bind my heart for evermair,

Untill the day I die.
O that I were where Helen lies!
Night and day on me she cries ;
Out of my bed she bids me rise,

Says, 'Haste, and come to me !'
O Helen fair ! O Helen chaste !
If I were with thee, I were blest,
Where thou lies low, and takes thy rest,

On fair Kirkconnel Lee.
I wish my grave were growing green,
A winding-sheet drawn ower my een,
And I in Helen's arms lying,

On fair Kirkconnel Lee.

I wish I were where Helen lies!
Night and day on me she cries,
And I am weary of the skies,
For her sake that died for me.

UNKNOWN.

To Althea from Prison

WHEN Love with unconfinèd wings

Hovers within my gates ; And my divine Althea brings

To whisper at the grates :
When I lie tangled in her hair,

And fetter'd to her eye;
The Gods that wanton in the air,

Know no such liberty.
When flowing cups run swiftly round

With no allaying Thames, Our careless heads with roses bound,

Our hearts with loyal flames ; When thirsty grief in wine we steep,

When healths and draughts go free, Fishes that tipple in the deep,

Know no such liberty.
When, like committed linnets, I

With shriller throat shall sing
The sweetness, mercy, majesty,

And glories of my KING;
When I shall voice aloud, how good

He is, how great should be ;
Enlarged winds that curl the flood,

Know no such liberty.
Stone walls do not a prison make,

Nor iron bars a cage ;
Minds innocent and quiet take

That for an hermitage ;
If I have freedom in my love,

And in my soul am free;
Angels alone that soar above,
Enjoy such liberty.

COLONEL LOVELACE.

I wandered lonely'

I WANDERED lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o'er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host, of golden daffodils ;
Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.
Continuous as the stars that shine
And twinkle on the milky way,
They stretched in never-ending line,
Along the margin of a bay :
Ten thousand saw I at a glance,
Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.
The waves beside them danced ; but they
Out-did the sparkling waves in glee :
A poet could not but be gay,
In such a jocund company:
I gazed-and gazed—but little thought
What wealth the show to me had brought :

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For oft, when on my couch I lie
In vacant or in pensive mood,
They flash upon that inward eye
Which is the bliss of solitude ;
And then my heart with pleasure fills,
And dances with the daffodils.

WORDSWORTH.

Hester

WHEN maidens such as Hester die,
Their place ye may not well supply,
Though ye among a thousand try,

With vain endeavour.

A month or more hath she been dead,
Yet cannot I by force be led
To think upon the wormy bed

And her together.

A springy motion in her gait,
A rising step, did indicate
Of pride and joy no common rate,

That flushed her spirit.
I know not by what name beside
I shall it call :-if'twas not pride,
It was a joy to that allied,

She did inherit.
Her parents held the Quaker rule,
Which doth the human feeling cool,
But she was train'd in Nature's school,

Nature had blest her.
A waking eye, a prying mind,
A heart that stirs, is hard to bind,
A hawk's keen sight ye cannot blind,

Ye could not Hester.
My sprightly neighbour ! gone before
To that unknown and silent shore,
Shall we not meet, as heretofore,

Some Summer morning,
When from thy cheerful eyes a ray
Hath struck a bliss upon the day,
A bliss that would not go away,
A sweet fore-warning ?

LAMB.

To Evening IF aught of oaten stop, or pastoral song, May hope, chaste Eve, to soothe thy modest ear,

Like thy own brawling springs,

Thy springs, and dying gales ;
O Nymph reserved, while now the bright-haird sun
Sits in yon western tent, whose cloudy skirts,

With brede ethereal wove,
O’erhang his

wavy Now air is hush'd, save where the weak-eyed bat With short shrill shriek flits by on leathern wing,

Or where the beetle winds
His small but sullen horn,

bed :

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