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of their effort is for all? A first-mate with knotted club seems necessary; and the dread of getting the bounce" Saturday night holds many a worker to his place. Advertise for a stenographer, and nine out of ten who apply can neither spell nor punctuate—and do not think it necessary to. Can such a one write a letter to Garcia ?

“You see that bookkeeper?” said the foreman to me in a large factory. “Yes, what about him?” “Well, he's a fine accountant, but if I'd send him up town on an errand, he might accomplish the errand all right, and on the other hand might stop at four saloons on the way, and when he got to Main Street would forget what he had been sent for." Can such a man be entrusted to carry a message to Garcia ?

We have recently been hearing much maudlin sympathy expressed for the "down-trodden denizen of the sweat-shop" and the "homeless wanderer searching for honest employment,” and with it all often go many hard words for the men in power. Nothing is said about the employer who grows old before his time in a vain attempt to get frowsy ne'er-do-wells to do intelligent work; and his long, patient striving with "help" that does nothing but loaf when his back is turned. In every store and factory there is a constant weeding-out process going on. The employer is constantly sending away "help" that have shown their incapacity to further the interests of the business, and others are being taken on. No matter how good times are, this sorting continues, only if times are hard and work is scarce, the sorting is done finerbut out and forever out, the incompetent and unworthy go. It is the survival of the fittest. Self-interest prompts every employer to keep the best—those who can carry a message to Garcia.

I know one man of really brilliant parts who has not the ability to manage a business of his own, and yet who is absolutely worthless to anyone else, because he carries with him constantly the insane suspicion that his employer is oppressing or intending to oppress him. He cannot give orders; and he will not receive them. Should a message be given him to take to Garcia, his answer would probably be, “Take it yourself!” Tonight this man walks the streets looking for work, the wind whistling through his threadbare coat. No one who knows him dares employ him, for he is a regular firebrand of discontent. He is impervious to reason, and the only thing that can impress him is the toe of a thick-soled No. 9 boot.

Of course I know that one so morally deformed is no less to be pitied than a physical cripple; but in our pitying, let us drop a tear, too, for the men who are striving to carry on a great enterprise, whose working hours are not limited by the whistle, and whose hair is fast turning white through the struggle to hold in line dowdy indifference, slip-shod imbecility, and the heartless ingratitude, which, but for their enterprise, would be both hungry and homeless.

Have I put the matter too strongly? Possibly I have; but when all the world has gone a-slumming I wish to

speak a word of sympathy for the man who succeedsthe man who, against great odds, has directed the efforts of others, and having succeeded finds there's nothing in it: nothing but board and clothes. I have carried a dinner pail and worked for day's wages, and I have also been an employer of labor, and I know there is something to be said on both sides. There is no excellence, per se, in poverty; rags are no recommendation; and all employers are not rapacious and high-handed, any more than all poor men are virtuous. My heart goes out to the man who does his work when the “boss” is away, as well as when he is at home. And the man, who, when given a letter for Garcia, quietly takes the missive, without asking any idiotic questions, and with no lurking intention of chucking it into the nearest sewer, or of doing aught else but deliver it, never gets “laid off," nor has to go on a strike for higher wages. Civilization is one long anxious search for just such individuals. Anything such a man asks shall be granted; his kind is so rare that no employer can afford to let him go. He is wanted in every city, town, and village—in every office, shop, store, and factory. The world cries out for such : he is needed, and needed badly—the man who can carry a message to Garcia.

Notes

McKinley; Garcia; Insurgents: at the time of the war with Spain in 1898, William McKinley was President of the United States, and Garcia was leader of the Cubans who were Insurgents against the rule of Spain.

Mars at Perihelion: the planet at its brightest.
Correggio (Kõr-rěd'-jo).
Per se: in itself.

Questions for Study 1. What one word is better than by the name of’’?

2. Judging from what you see at home and in the schoolroom, do you think Hubbard's criticism is true of boys and girls? Do men who merit such criticism deserve to win promotion? What do you think is the cause of their inefficiency?

3. To win success, is it sufficient merely to start off without asking unnecessary questions? What else did Rowan do that made him a hero?

4. What are the qualities in the employer that the author praises? How much do these qualities differ from those desirable in the employee?

ABOU BEN ADHEM

LEIGH HUNT

And saw,

Abou Ben Adhem (may his tribe increase!)
Awoke one night from a deep dream of peace,

within the moonlight in his room,
Making it rich, and like a lily in bloom,
An angel writing in a book of gold :-
Exceeding peace had made Ben Adhem bold,
And to the presence in the room he said,

“What writest thou?!—The vision raised its head, And with a look made of all sweet accord, Answered, “The names of those who love the Lord.''

“And is mine one?” said Abou. “Nay, not so," Replied the angel. Abou spoke more low,

But cheerily still; and said, “I pray thee, then,
Write me as one that loves his fellow men.”

The angel wrote, and vanished. The next night
It came again with a great wakening light,
And showed the names whom love of God had blessed,
And lo! Ben Adhem's name led all the rest.

Questions for Study 1, Explain what difference you can find between loving the Lord and loving your fellow men. What are some of the acts that one does because he loves the Lord ? What are some that one does because he loves his fellow man? Why were the lives of the hermits of the Middle Ages failures ?

2. If you have read Ruskin's "King of the Golden River," tell how the theme of this poem is emphasized there.

THE LEGEND OF SLEEPY HOLLOW

WASHINGTON IRVING

A pleasing land of drowsy head it was,
Of dreams that wave before the half-shut eye;
And of gay castles in the clouds that pass,
Forever flushing round a summer sky.

Castle of Indolence.

PART ONE

In the bosom of one of those spacious coves which indent the eastern shore of the Hudson, at that broad expansion of the river denominated by the ancient Dutch navigators the Tappan Zee, and where they always prudently shortened sail and implored the protection of

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