The Sonnets of William Shakspere, ed. by E. Dowden, 223. kötet

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Kegan Paul, Trench & Company, 1881 - 306 oldal
 

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159. oldal - They that have power to hurt and will do none, That do not do the thing they most do show, Who, moving others, are themselves as stone. Unmoved, cold, and to temptation slow. They rightly do inherit heaven's graces And husband nature's riches from expense-, They are the lords and owners of their faces. Others but stewards of their excellence. The summer's flower is to the summer sweet. Though to itself it only live and die; But if that flower with base infection meet.
127. oldal - When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state, And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries, And look upon myself, and curse my fate, Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, Featured like him, like him with friends possessed, Desiring this man's art, and that man's scope...
161. oldal - Saturn laughed and leaped with him. Yet nor the lays of birds, nor the sweet smell Of different flowers in odour and in hue, Could make me any summer's story tell...
139. oldal - O, how much more doth beauty beauteous seem By that sweet ornament which truth doth give! The rose looks fair, but fairer we it deem For that sweet odour which doth in it live.
113. oldal - From fairest creatures we desire increase, That thereby beauty's rose might never die, But as the riper should by time decease, His tender heir might bear his memory : But thou, contracted to thine own bright eyes, Feed'st thy light's flame with self-substantial fuel, Making a famine where abundance lies, Thyself thy foe, to thy sweet self too cruel. Thou that art now the world's fresh ornament And only herald to the gaudy spring, Within thine own bud buriest thy content.
222. oldal - I'll sup. Farewell. Poins. Farewell, my lord. [Exit POINS. P. Hen. I know you all, and will a while uphold The unyok'd humour of your idleness : Yet herein will I imitate the sun, Who doth permit the base contagious clouds ' To smother up his beauty from the world, That when he please again to be himself, Being wanted, he may be more wonder'd at, By breaking through the foul and ugly mists Of vapours, that did seem to strangle him.
121. oldal - Shall I compare thee to a summer's day ? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, And summer's lease hath all too short a date...
156. oldal - Farewell! thou art too dear for my possessing, And like enough thou know'st thy estimate. The charter of thy worth gives thee releasing; My bonds in thee are all determinate. For how do I hold thee but by thy granting ? And for that riches where is my deserving ? The cause of this fair gift in me is wanting, And so my patent back again is swerving.
126. oldal - But then begins a journey in my head To work my mind, when body's work's expired : For then my thoughts, from far where I abide, Intend a zealous pilgrimage to thee, And keep my drooping eyelids open wide...
145. oldal - Since brass, nor stone, nor earth, nor boundless sea, But sad mortality o'ersways their power, How with this rage...

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