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We might have had enough, enough

For every want of ours,
For luxury, medicine, and toil,

And yet have had no flowers.

The ore within the mountain mine

Requireth none to grow ;
Nor doth it need the lotus-flower

To make the river flow.

The clouds might give abundant rain;

The nightly dews might fall,
And the herb that keepeth life in man,

Might yet have drnuk them all.

Then wherefore, wherefore were they made,

All dyed with rainbow-light,
All fashioned with supremest grace

Upspringing day and night :

Springing in valleys green and low,

And on the mountains high, And in the silent wilderness

Where no man passes by ?

Our outward life requires them not

Then wherefore had they birth ?To minister delight to man,

To beautify the eerth ;

To comfort man-to whisper hope,

When'er his faith is dim,
For who so careth for the flowers

Will much more care for him!

OR

FAMILIAR CONVERSATIONS ON SCIENCE AND THE ARTS.

With numerous Beautiful Plates.

BY WILLIAM MARTIN.
EDITOR OF THE “EDUCATIONAL MAGAZINE."

Price Four Shillings and Sixpence.

“ The 'Parlour Book,' should certainly be in every nursery—if not in every parlour. It treats scientifically and perspicuously of all manner of things, from the gorgeous fabrication of the rainbow, athwart the mighty expanse of the everlasting skies, to the simple erection of windmills and houses.” Metropolitan Conservative Journal.

“The Parlour Book is replete with exact and yet interesting exhibitions and descriptions of science and the arts ; affording a rich variety of useful information in plain language, interspersed with pleasant dialogue.”-Sunday School Teachers' Magazine.

“ To direct the minds of youth to some of the most interesting phenomena of nature, they could hardly have a more simple or attractive companion.”--Literary Gazette.

A beautiful book filled with good matter and excellent engravings.”—Family Magazine.

32mo with a beautiful Frontispiece Price Three Shillings and

Sixpence.
THE CHRISTIAN LACON;

OR

MATERIALS FOR THINKING, IN A CHRISTIAN SPIRIT.

BY WILLIAM MARTIN.

“A valuable pocket volume of christian and moral truths.”Essex Standard.

“Those who read the Christian Lacon,' will we are sure rise up from its perusal, with their feelings elevated, their minds purified, and their capacities enlarged.”—Monthly Magazine.

“This is a volume of rare merit.”--Evangelical Magazine.

DARTON AND CLARK, HOLBORN HILL:

In royal 18mo. with a Map, and Mustrative plates, price 3s. 6d.

THE NATURAL HISTORY OF MAN,

CONTAINING THE CHARACTERS OF

THE FIVE PRINCIPAL VARIETIES OF MANKIND,

COMPRISING THE VIEWS OF
BLUMENBACH, PRITCHARD, LAWRENCE, BUFFON, &c.

“It needs but little reflection in order to be convinced not only of the utility, but of the importance, of a work, which shall place the knowledge of our own species on a level with that which we possess of most other living beings. This knowledge is only to be acquired with the same attention, and on the same plan of reasoned analysis and classification, which has been employed on other divisions of Natural History.

Man's higher place in the scale of creation ought surely to be a sufficient incitement to us to pursue such an investigation as is contained in the present volume; for it is only with regard to man that the importance of other existences, or any attainments in science or skill are commonly viewed.

It is, however, too true, that the structure, changes, and peculiar habits of the horse, the rabbit, the canary bird, or the butterfly, and the countries they inhabit, are much more familiar to us than the same knowledge of the varieties of mankind.

The attentive consideration of the natural history of man, cannot fail to create a desire for the knowledge of every thing which has influence in causing the differences every where observed; and thus will the reading of geography and general history become instructively and pleasantly connected with the motives of our conduct in life.

The author of this volume has cast out all technical, unpopular, and improper matter, and he has given an improved arrangement, namely, that of natural history, instead of that of anatomy."

“We have before now, under such a title as this, discovered a mass of lurking scepticism ; but we are happy to say of this volume, that it is intended to counteract this mischievous tendency of our fallen nature, by exhibiting physical and scientific evidence of a common origin of the human race.”—Evangelical Magazine.

“The physical economy of man, and the varieties of the human species are treated in this little work with clearness and ability. This book may be consulted by young readers with advantage, for, although it does not contain any novel theories, or elucidate any facts in the natural history of man which have not been already expounded, it possesses the merit of being written in a popular and familiar way which will make it intelligible to the capacity of youth."-Atlas.

ATHLETIC EXERCISES AND AMUSEMENTS.

BY WILLIAM MARTIN.

AUTHOR OF

THE PARLOUR BOOK," ETC.

Price Three Shillings and Sixpence, with many plates.

“ Is a little volume admirably adapted to its object; and its object is the worthy one of tempting children to the pursuit of wisdom by healthy exercise in paths of pleasantness and peace, which lead to it.”—News.

“Everything that can tend by exercise to give health and strength to the body, and information, as well as healthful exercise to the mind, is here sensibly and in a most entertaining manner developed and described.”—Tyne Mercury.

“This is one of the prettiest, and we are confident will prove one of the most acceptable presents that has yet been compiled for the use of our juvenile friends.”—Liverpool Albion.

“A nice boy's book, in which the playing of juvenile games is well described, from marbles to cricket, and from hunt the slipper to chess ; swimming, angling, and a few chemical and philoso. phical amusements are also treated of, in a manner adapted to youthful capacities.”—Literary Gazette.

“Regardless of the sombre manner in which some persons view the scientific pursuits, as well as nearly all the sports of children, an ardent love of seeing children happy, causes us to give this work our most unqualified recommendation." — Sunday School Teachers' Magazine.

“All sorts of games, from ring-taw to cricket, with their rules and regulations, are laid down in this clever little book, which may settle as many disputes among young children, as Hoyle does among old ones.”—Metropolitan.

DARTON AND CLARK, HOLBORN HILL.

OF

THE EARTH, SEA, AND SKY.

With numerous Plates and Cuts, price Five Shillings.

“We decidedly pronounce this to be a work of superior merit, for the purpose of introducing young people to the various branches of Natural History.”—Monthly Review.

“The volume before us bears no date, and we are not certain whether it is new or old. But new or old, it is a very pleasant and a very valuable book for its class of readers.”—Monthly Repository.

"Another admirable book for youth."-News. “This little volume is admirably calculated for engaging the attention of the young, and inciting them to the study of natural science, by a familiar description of all that is wonderful in “earth, sea, and sky."-Bolton Free Press.

“We hardly know which to admire most the simple and interesting style, or the striking and beautiful pictorial representation of this work."-Sunday School Teachers' Magazine.

“The press almost teems with works of entertainment and instruction for children, but these wonderful things narrated by Peter Parley may show their face without being ashamed amongst the best of them."-Watchman.

“ This is a very pretty, and withall a very useful little book, which we may safely recommend to parents and guardians, as well adapted for the entertainment and instruction of young persons. It is adorned with a great number of neat engravings, some of which are beautifully coloured.”—Weekly Dispatch.

DARTON AND CLARK, HOLBORN HILL.

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