The Oxford History of Classical Reception in English Literature: Volume 1: 800-1558

Első borító
Rita Copeland
Oxford University Press, 2016. jan. 28. - 770 oldal
The Oxford History of Classical Reception in English Literature (OHCREL) is designed to offer a comprehensive investigation of the numerous and diverse ways in which literary texts of the classical world have stimulated responses and refashioning by English writers. Covering the full range of English literature from the early Middle Ages to the present day, OHCREL both synthesizes existing scholarship and presents cutting-edge new research, employing an international team of expert contributors for each of the five volumes. OHCREL endeavours to interrogate, rather than inertly reiterate, conventional assumptions about literary 'periods', the processes of canon-formation, and the relations between literary and non-literary discourse. It conceives of 'reception' as a complex process of dialogic exchange and, rather than offering large cultural generalizations, it engages in close critical analysis of literary texts. It explores in detail the ways in which English writers' engagement with classical literature casts as much light on the classical originals as it does on the English writers' own cultural context. This first volume, and fourth to appear in the series, covers the years c.800-1558, and surveys the reception and transformation of classical literary culture in England from the Anglo-Saxon period up to the Henrician era. Chapters on the classics in the medieval curriculum, the trivium and quadrivium, medieval libraries, and medieval mythography provide context for medieval reception. The reception of specific classical authors and traditions is represented in chapters on Virgil, Ovid, Lucan, Statius, the matter of Troy, Boethius, moral philosophy, historiography, biblical epics, English learning in the twelfth century, and the role of antiquity in medieval alliterative poetry. The medieval section includes coverage of Chaucer, Gower, and Lydgate, while the part of the volume dedicated to the later period explores early English humanism, humanist education, and libraries in the Henrician era, and includes chapters that focus on the classicism of Skelton, Douglas, Wyatt, and Surrey.
 

Mit mondanak mások - Írjon ismertetőt

Nem találtunk ismertetőket a szokott helyeken.

Tartalomjegyzék

Introduction England and the Classics from the Early Middle Ages to Early Humanism
1
The Curricular Classics in the Middle Ages
21
Experiencing the Classics in Medieval Education
35
The Trivium and the Classics
53
The Quadrivium and Natural Sciences
77
The Transmission and Circulation of Classical Literaturev
95
Mythography and Mythographical Collections
121
Academic Prologues to Authors
151
Other Worlds Chaucers Classicism
413
Gowers Ovids
435
John Lydgate and the Remaking of Classical Epic
465
Early Humanism in England
487
Survey of Henrician Humanism
515
John Skelton
541
Gavin Douglass Eneados
561
Finding a Vernacular Voice The Classical Translations of Sir Thomas Wyatt
583

Virgil
165
Ovid and Ovidianism
187
Lucan
209
Statius
227
Trojan Itineraries and the Matter of Troy
251
Boethius De consolatione philosophiae
269
Moral Philosophy and Wisdom Literature
299
Historiography and Biography from the Period of Gildas to Gerald of Wales
323
Prudentius and the Late Classical Biblical Epics of Juvencus Proba Sedulius Arator and Avitus
351
John of Salisbury Academic Scepticism and Ciceronian Rhetoric
377
Alliterative Poetry and the Time of Antiquity
391
The Aeneid Translations of Henry Howard Earl of Surrey The Exiled Readers Presence
601
Select Bibliography of Ancient Sources including late antiquity and early Christian writings
625
Libraries Textual Transmission Historical Sources
633
Studies on Ancient Authorsand Classical Reception
637
Primary Sources
645
Secondary Sources
659
Primary Sources
699
Secondary Sources
705
Index
719
Copyright

Más kiadások - Összes megtekintése

Gyakori szavak és kifejezések

A szerzőről (2016)

Rita Copeland is Rosenberg Chair in the Humanities at the University of Pennsylvania, and a Fellow of the Medieval Academy of America. Her fields of research include the history of rhetoric, literary theory, and medieval learning. She is a founder of the journal New Medieval Literatures, and co-founder of Toronto Series in Medieval and Early Modern Rhetoric. In addition to many articles, she has published the following books: Rhetoric, Hermeneutics, and Translation in the Middle Ages (1991), Criticism and Dissent in the Middle Ages (1996), Pedagogy, Intellectuals and Dissent in the Later Middle Ages (2001), Medieval Grammar and Rhetoric: Language Arts and Literary Theory, AD 300-1475 (with Ineke Sluiter) (2009), and The Cambridge Companion to Allegory (with Peter Struck) (2010).

Bibliográfiai információk