The Works of President Edwards, with a Memoir of His Life, 1. kötet

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S. Converse, 1829 - 582 oldal
"The number of those men, who have produced great and permanent changes in the character and condition of mankind, and stamped their own image on the minds of succeeding generations, is comparatively small; and, even of this small number, the great body have been indebted for their superior efficiency, at least in part, to extraneous circumstances, while very few can ascribe it to the simple strength of their own intellect. Yet here and there an individual can be found, who, by his mere mental energy, has changed the course of human thought and feeling, and led mankind onward in that new and better path which he had opened to their view. Such an individual was Jonathan Edwards. In preparing the Memoir, the Life by Dr. Hopkins, which is the testimony of an eye-witness, has been in corporated; and the quotations are marked in the usual way, except where the paragraphs are seriously altered by the insertion of new matter. In the last chapter, free use is made of a brief sketch of the Life and Character of Mr. Edwards, (also the testimony of an eye-witness,) by a gentleman connected with the college at Princeton, probably Dr. Finley, inserted in the first edition of the Treatise on Original Sin; as well as of a well written review of the Worcester Edition of his works, in the Christian Spectator. To a friend I am indebted, for the very brief account of the two Treatises on Original Sin, and the Freedom of the Will"--Book. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved).

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A szerzőről (1829)

In 1716 Edwards was admitted to Yale at the remarkable age of thirteen. After he graduated in 1722, he spent four years there pursuing theological interests, teaching, and completing his master's degree. In 1727 ,Edwards complied with his grandfather's request and traveled to Northhampton, Massachusetts to be his assistant in his church. A committed scholar of John Calvin and the early Puritan theologians, as well as of the writings of John Locke and Isaac Newton, Edwards pursued a theology founded on two seemingly contradictory themes---a desire to return to the Calvinist tradition, as well as a desire to include the insights of contemporary Enlightenment philosophy. While Edwards's theological formulations were not completely developed until the 1750s, his lifetime pursuit of these ideas profoundly influenced the Puritan period of religious revival known as the Great Awakening. Though Edwards's provocative theology and sermons occasionally invoked fire and brimstone, as in the famous Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God (1741), his sermons generally moved parishioners to faith through the employment of positive imagery, as in God Glorified in Man's Dependence (1731). In spite of his successes during the Great Awakening, Edwards was ultimately involved in a controversy that led to his dismissal at the Northhampton parish in 1750. Viewed as too progressive by a faction of the church known as the Old Lights, Edwards stepped down after delivering his famous Farewell Sermon (1750), in which he declared that God would ultimately determine whether Edwards had been right or wrong

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