The Smile: If You Can Do Nothing Else, You Can Smile,

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School of Expression, 1915 - 150 oldal

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100. oldal - I sate reclined, In that sweet mood when pleasant thoughts Bring sad thoughts to the mind. To her fair works did Nature link The human soul that through me ran ; And much it grieved my heart to think What man has made of man. Through primrose tufts, in that green bower, The periwinkle trailed its wreaths ; And 'tis my faith that every flower Enjoys the air it breathes.
58. oldal - Why take the artistic way to prove so much ? Because, it is the glory and good of Art, That Art remains the one way possible Of speaking truth, to mouths like mine at least.
9. oldal - Turn thy wild wheel thro' sunshine, storm, and cloud; Thy wheel and thee we neither love nor hate. 'Turn, Fortune, turn thy wheel with smile or frown; With that wild wheel we go not up or down; Our hoard is little, but our hearts are great. ' Smile and we smile, the lords of many lands; Frown and we smile, the lords of our own hands; For man is man and master of his fate. ' Turn, turn thy wheel above the staring crowd ; Thy wheel and thou are shadows in the cloud; Thy wheel and thee we neither love...
15. oldal - FLOWER in the crannied wall, I pluck you out of the crannies ; — Hold you here, root and all, in my hand, Little flower — but if I could understand What you are, root and all, and all in all, I should know what God and man is.
59. oldal - Are not so bad to bear — but here's the plague That all this trouble comes of telling truth, Which truth, by when it reaches him, looks false, Seems to be just the thing it would supplant, Nor recognizable by whom it left: While falsehood would have done the work of truth. But Art, — wherein man nowise speaks to men, Only to mankind, — Art may tell a truth Obliquely, do the thing shall breed the thought, Nor wrong the thought, missing the mediate word.
113. oldal - What is the use of thee, thou gnarled sapling ? " said a young larchtree to a young oak. "I grow three feet in a year, thou scarcely as many inches, I am straight and taper as a reed, thou straggling and twisted as a loosened withe.
114. oldal - The richer a nature, the harder and slower its development. Two boys were once of a class in the Edinburgh grammar-school : John ever trim, precise and dux ; Walter ever slovenly, confused and dolt.
59. oldal - Art, — wherein man nowise speaks to men, Only to mankind, — Art may tell a truth Obliquely, do the thing shall breed the thought, Nor wrong the thought, missing the mediate word. So may you paint your picture, twice show truth, Beyond mere imagery on the wall, — So, note by note, bring music from your mind, Deeper than ever e'en Beethoven dived, — So write a book shall mean beyond the facts, Suffice the eye and save the soul beside.
142. oldal - He will do more in the same time, — he will do it better, — he will persevere longer. One is scarcely sensible of fatigue whilst he marches to music. The very stars are said to make harmony as they revolve in their spheres. Wondrous is the strength of cheerfulness, altogether past calculation its powers of endurance. Efforts, to be permanently useful, must be uniformly joyous, — a spirit all sunshine, — graceful from very gladness, — beautiful because bright.
100. oldal - tis my faith that every flower Enjoys the air it breathes. The birds around me hopped and played, Their thoughts I cannot measure : — But the least motion which they made, It seemed a thrill of pleasure. The budding twigs spread out their fan, To catch the breezy air; And I must think, do all I can, That there was pleasure there.

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