Mental Science: A Compendium of Psychology and the History of Philosophy ...

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D. Appleton and Company, 1882
 

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Three classes of feelings connected with muscle
17
Slow movements allied to repose and passivity
23
Acute Diseases of the nerves nervous Fatigue Healthy nerves
30
Sensations of Taste
37
Belishes and Disgusts ib 5 Tastes proper Sweet and Bitter
38
SENSB OF SMELL 1 Smell related to the Lungs
39
gaseous or volatile bodies ib 3 Development of odours by heat light and moisture ib 4 Diffusion of odours
40
in sympathy with the lungs are Fresh and Close odours
41
Fragrant odours and the opposite ib 9 Odours involving tactile sensibility Pungency
42
SENSE OF TOUCH 1 Touch an intellectual Sense The Objects solid bodies
43
Emotional Soft Touch Pungent Touch Tempera ture Tickling and acute pains
44
Plurality of PointsWebers expert ments Pressure
45
Resistance Hardness and Softness Roughness and Smoothness Exten sion or the Coexisting in Space
47
SENSE OF HEARING 1 Objects of Hearingmaterial bodies in a state of tremor
51
The Ear a 3 The mode of action in hearing
52
Pitch Waxing and Waning Harmony and Discord
54
Clearness Timbre Articulato sounds Distance and Direction
55
SENSE OF 8HJHT 1 Objects of Sight
56
The Eye ib 3 Mode of action in the first place an optical effect
59
Binocular Vision Seeing objects erect by an inverted imago
60
THE APPETITES
67
Muscles of the Body generally
73
Law of Selfconservation
79
BETENTTVENESSLAW OF CONTIGUITY Pm I Retentiveness mostly comprehended under the Law of Conti guity
85
MOVEMENTS
86
Spontaneous and Instinctive actions strengthened by exercise
87
Intervention of Sensations in trains of Movement ib 7 Conditions governing the rate of Acquisition generally ib 8 Circumstances favouring the adhes...
88
All acquirements suppose Physical Vigour
89
Association of Ideas of Movement ib 11 The seat of Ideas the same as of Sensations or Actualities ib 12 The tendency of Idcns to becomo Actualities ...
90
The principle applied to explain Sympathy
91
Points common to the Idea and to the Actuality
92
SENSATIONS OF THE SAME SENSE 18 In all the senses different sensations are associated together
93
Separate ideas becomo selfsustaining by repetition ib 20 Association of Sensations of Touch
94
Law of the Rate of Acquirement in Touch ib 22 The acquirements of Touch most numerous in the blind
95
Forma and Coloured surfaces
97
SENSATIONS OF DIFFERENT SENSES
98
Movements with Sensations Muscular Ideas with Sensations Architecture Sensations with Sensations
99
Law of the Rate of such acquirements
100
Localization of the Bodily Feelings
101
Our body is an object fact with subject associations
102
Pleasure and Pain can persist and be reproduced ideally ib 31 Law of the association
103
The Special Emotions converted into Affections
104
ASSOCIATIONS OF VOLITION 40 Contiguous association of actions and states of feeling
109
Our ideas of external nature are associations of sensiblo qualities ib 42 The Naturalist mind represents disinterested association
110
Association of things habitually conjoined in our view ib 45 Maps Diagrams and Pictorial Representations Ill SUCCESSIONS
111
MECHANICAL ACQUISITIONS 47 Summary of conditions of Mechanical Acquirement
114
Proper duration of exorcises
115
ACQUISITIONS OF LANGUAGE 49 Oral Language involves the Voice and the Ear
117
Operation of Special Interest in lingual acquisitions ib 53 Elocution involves an Ear for Cadence
118
Written languago appeals to the senso of Visible Form ib 55 Shert metheds of acquiring languago ib 56 Verbal adhesiveness ar aid to the memory of ...
119
Knowledge as Science is clothed in artificial symbols ib 58 The Object Sciences aro Concrete or Abstract ib 69 The Subject Sciences are grounded on...
120
Circumstances favouring acquirements in mental Scienco ib 61 Supposed faculty of SelfConsciousness
121
BUSINESS OR PRACTICAL LIFE 62 Acquirements in the higher branches of Industry
122
Fino Art constructions give refined pleasure ib 64 Conditions of Acquisition in Pino Art
123
History the succession of ovents as narrated ib 66 Transactions witnessed impress themselves as Sensations and Actions
124
Impediment of Diversity Special condition for this case
130
Sight Colours Forms and their combinations
136
I Definition
143
Similarity exemplified in certain of the Fine Arts
149
MIXED CONTIGUITY AND SIMILARITY
155
CONSTRUCTIVE ASSOCIATION
161
Cu Constructing new muscular ideas Hitting a mark Archi
165
PRACTICAL CONSTRUCTIONS
171
APPENDIX
181
Admission by Berkeleys opponents that the instinctivo percep tion is aided by associations
193
Objection to the theory of Acquired Perception that we aro not conscious of tactual or locomotive reminiscences
194
Observations on persons born blind and made to soe
195
Instinctive Perceptions of the Lower Animals ib 14 Observations on infants
196
Hypothesis of hereditary transmission of the perception
197
PERCEPTION OF A MATERIAL WORLD
198
Hume Summary of his philosophical doctrines generally
205
Chance or Uncertainty contributes to the engrossment
209
Feelin1r in general defined
216
DESIRE
217
EMOTION OF TERROR
227
Terror definedThe apprehension of coming evil 282
234
The Physical side involves 1 Touch 2 the Lachrymal
240
SPECIES OF THE TENDER EMOTION
243
EMOTIONS OF SELF
250
the rules of Polite society
255
Arising in pain and occasioning pleasure in inflicting pain
261
Justice involves sympathetic Resentment
267
The excitement of Pursuit is seen in the Lower Animals
270
Contests tb 8 The occupations of Industry give scope for Plotinterest
271
The search after Knowledge
272
Form of pain the prolongation of the suspense
273
Pleasures and pains attending Intellectual operations ib 2 Feelings in the working of Contiguity
274
New identities of Science incrcaso the range of intellectual comprehension
275
Discoveries of Practice gives the pleasure of increased power ib 7 Illustrative Comparisons remit intellectual toil
276
Sympathy is entering into and acting out the feelings of others ib 2 It supposes 1 our remembered experience 2 a connexion between the Expression ...
277
Circumstances favouring Sympathy
278
Completion of Sympathyvicarious action
280
Sympathy supports mens feelings and opinions ib 8 Moulding of mens sentiments and views ib 9 Sympathy an indirect sourco of pleasure to the sym...
281
IDEAL EMOTION
283
Feeling in the Actual often thwarted by the accompaniments
287
IT Cooperation of the Intellect with the Senses
293
Support Order 209
300
Addison Hutcheson Diderot
306
associated emotions or affections
309
The causes of Laughter 815
315
G A link has to bo formed between actions and feelings
322
of Selfconservation and finally associated by Contiguity
325
Second stage the uniting of movements with Intermediate Ends
332
Learning to Articuiato 168
334
CONTROL OF FEELINGS AND THOUGHTS
338
Command of the Theughts a means of controlling the Feelings
344
THE CONFLICT OF MOTIVES
354
Desire is a motive to actwitheut the ability
366
I Emotional suscepti
387
Influences on the side of Duty Sympathy coupled with Pru
393
3 Meanings of Cheice Deliberation Selfdetermination Moral
400
history of the freewill controversy
406
Descartes Wo are conscious of Freedom Liberty is
412
The intellectual functions commonly expressed by Memory
1
Ideal Emotion is affected by Organic states S There may bo a Temperament for Emotion 283 284
2
The Perception of Matter a distinct attitude of the consciousness 198
3
Light Colour Lustre
5
Visible Move
6
Classification of the kinds of Food
8
Figures of Similitude abound in all great works of literary
19
Aristotle Enters his protest against separating Universals from
23
Hcmr Abstract ideas are in themselves individual
29
fi The only generality having separate existence is the Name 17J
31
Ritual
33
Money Formali ties Truth 105
34
ment Visible Form Apparent Size Distance Volume Visible Situation 63
63
Events narrated have the aid of the Verbal Memory
67
S Applications of a Knowledge of the Intellectual Powers 84
84

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207. oldal - For my part, when I enter most intimately into what I call myself, I always stumble on some particular perception or other, of heat or cold, light or shade, love or hatred, pain or pleasure. I never can catch myself at any time without a perception, and never can observe anything but the perception.
28. oldal - Likewise the idea of man that I frame to myself, must be either of a white, or a black, or a tawny, a straight or a crooked, a tall or a low, or a middle-sized man.
28. oldal - ... consider some particular parts or qualities separated from others, with which, though they are united in some object, yet it is possible they may really exist without them. But I deny that I can abstract...
203. oldal - The table I write on I say exists, that is I see and feel it, and if I were out of my study I should say it existed, meaning thereby that if I was in my study I might perceive it, or that some other spirit actually does perceive it.
27. oldal - Words become general by being made the signs of general ideas : and ideas become general by separating from them the circumstances of time, and place, and any other ideas that may determine them to this or that particular existence.
64. oldal - There is a certain regard due to human testimony in matters of fact, and even to human authority in matters of opinion.
28. oldal - Whether others have this wonderful faculty of abstracting their ideas, they best can tell : for myself I find indeed I have a faculty of imagining, or representing to myself the ideas of those particular things I have perceived, and of variously compounding and dividing them.
75. oldal - ... :—States of pleasure are concomitant with\ an increase, and states of pain with an abatement, of some, ; or all, of the vital functions.
214. oldal - This puts the final seal to our conception of the groups of possibilities as the fundamental reality in Nature. The permanent possibilities are common to us and to our fellow-creatures ; the actual sensations are not. That which other people become aware of, when and on the same grounds as I do, seems more real to me than that which they do not know of, unless I tell them.
206. oldal - It is a question of fact, whether the perceptions of the senses be produced by external objects, resembling them: how shall this question be determined? By experience surely; as all other questions of a like nature. But here experience is, and must be entirely silent.

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