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PUBLIC AMUSEMENTS.

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rate, we meant not that Thalia should kick the ses richlyornamented with diamonds. His Royal beam. Since our laft, we have had only scenes Highness the Prince of Wales had a suit of darkof woe at both theatres. Indeed, these represen- blu: Geneva velvet, richly trimmed with gold lace. tations have been managed with so much art, or rather artifice, that we have been almost templed

On the 18th inft. Mr. WARD, from the to suspect that the great Katterfelto himself af.

Theatre Royal in Edinburgh, son of the wellfifted in the conduct of our Theatres Royal. known Mrs. Ward, and who some years ago apCertain it is, that the moral and divine philofo- peared at Covent Garden Theatre in the character pher's method has been in part adopted: for, as

of Romeo, renewed his acquaintance with a Lon. he informs his audience, when they first go to see

don audience in the part of Ranger, in the Suspihis Wonders! wonders! and wonders! that they cious Husband. Making proper allowances for the must come again, if they wish to behold his solar

embarrassment inseparable from a first attempts microscope; fo chey, with precisely the same view,

as well as for the difficulty of the task, no actor inform those who go to see Mr. Kemble, that

since Garrick having been found compleatly equal they must come again if they wish to behold his to it, we may with great justice affirm that his incomparable sister, Mrs. Şiddons. Surely, this

exertions deserved the plaudits with which he was is a species of trick every way unworthy of the

received. managers of a theatre-royal. Let the Dramatis Personæ of many performances a few years since

COVENT GARDEN. be examined, and it will appear, that Mr. Powell,

N the 3d of this month Mr. JOHNSTONE, Mr. Barty) Mr. Holland, Mr. Reddish, Mrs.

from the Theatre Royal, Dublin, made Yates, and Mrs. Crawford, all frequently appear- his first appearance here in the character of Lioed in the same piece: and though the entertain- nel, in the comic opera of Lionel and Clarissa. ment was, it is true, most exquisitely delightful, Mr. Johnstone has a good figure, with an excel• the managers thought it not too good for the pub- lent voice, and promises to be a considerable falic, nor were the public backward in giving fuit

vourite. He is a native of Kilkenny, in Ireland, able encouragement to such exertions. There

and has been on the Dublin Atage upwards of seven was, then, no necessity, after the performances

years. Mr. Johnstone has been married about had once been announced as daily, for occafion

five years to his present wife, (formerly Miss Poi. ally shutting up the theatres, through the dread

tiers) who appeared at this theatre on the 17th of drawing up the curtain to empty benches.

of last month. DRURY LANE.

On the oth inft. a new Pantomimical Ballet,

called the RIVAL KNIGHTS, was exhibited at N the 7th of this month, Mrs. WILSON

this theatre, the story of which is as follows. made her first appearance on a London Pierre de Provence, and the Princess Magustage, in the character of Phillis, in the comedy lonne, daughter of the King of Naples, are the of the Conscious Lovers. Her figure is genteel, hero and heroine of the piece. The Chevalier and her deportment graceful, but the poffeffes, on Ferrieres rivals Pierre in her affections. The the whole, a very moderate portion of dramatic interposition of her father's authority causes much ability.

embarrassment to the parties, and induces the On the 8th instant Mrs. SIDDONS made her princess to make her escape with Pierre. In a first theatrical entrée this season, and performed forest she is attacked by a lion; and, whilft her the part of Isabella. The dramatic excellence of lover is employed in vanquishing the beast, Ferthis lady is so well known, that we think it needy rieres, in Pierre's absence, seizes and carries her less to enter into any discussion on the subject of away. The princess now believes that Pierre is her representation; and shall content ourselves destroyed by the lion; but, in a grand tournawith observing, that the audience seemed to feel ment, wherein it is declared that the victor shall the same amazement and admiration with which be rewarded with the hand of the princess, he they were ftruck the first time she appeared be- steps forward in disguise, at the moment that Ferfore them, a peculiar advantage of superior ge- , rieres (who had previously vaňquished his opponius, which ever preserves the merit of novelty. nent) is claiming her as his promised reward. Their Majesties, accompanied by the Prince of Here a most astonishing combat takes place beWales, the Princess Royal, and Princess Au- tween the two rivals, which terminates in favour gusta, honoured the theatre with their presence. of the stranger; and the king, charmed with his His Majesty was dressed in a plain suit of Quaker. address and bravery, is about to present him with coloured cloathe, with gold buttons; the Queen the princess, who is prevented from killing her. in white fattin, and her head dress ornament- self by the unknown knight's taking off his ed with a great number of diamonds. The helmet, and proving to be Pierre de Provence. Princess Royal was dressed in a white and blué Mutual intercessions procure the king's consent figured lilk, and the Princess Augufta in a rose. to their union, and the piece concludes with the

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viétor's

Why flow those tears? (the lovely phantom cries;) Thou ample room didit find
Why break soft foothing rest with endless fighs ? In Yorick's liberal mind;
Complaint is vain-thy hopeless with confine;

That mind, most exquisitively fraught
The much-lov'd ** never must be thine!

With nature, fancy, wit, and thought: Ah, stay, sweet shade! I wake, and fondly cry

Alas! he charms no more, Once more regale my fight before I die:

« Who set the table in a roar!' Thy prefence only can my grief dispel,

No more Maria's tale fhall move Or snatch my spirit from it's mortal cell!

His tender heart with generous love; It comes no more. But now I wake to grieve; No more Le Fevre's pangs be felt Fresh flow my tears, and fighs my bosom heave. By him, who taught our kindred souls to melt.

Ye violet banks, that oft my limbs have borne; Ye winding streams, that learnt of me to mourn;

But, ah! what fairy scenes I view! Ye cooing doves, that tune your plaintive lay;

My rayish'd soul what mighty magic charms! Ye leafy shades, where love has made me stray:

To think the sweet delusion true, For her bloom fair; melodious be your strains;

My fond imagination warms. Whilft I'm condemn’d to never-ceafing pains!

'Tis Miellerie I see! Let guardian angels all their sweetness shed, St. Preuxt, and Julia, wandering Now, And shower their influence o'er her favour'd head:

Seem to tell their tale of woe. May they protect her with peculiar care;

Ah! hapless, hapless pair! She all that's lovely, innocent, and fair!

Thy victims, Sensibility, Now, plaintive Mufe, go tell the mournful tale; Too exquisite to bear. Alone to her thy master's name reveal;

Thou, in the usurer's cell, Her tender heart will listen to thy strains,

Didst ever scorn to dwell; Nor laugh at love, nor mock the lover's pains:

Where orphan's tears, and widow's fighs, But when the nymph these artless lines shall see,

For ever flow, for ever rise, She'll spare one figh, one tear, to love and me.

But flow and rise in vain;
If at thy tale the tear of pity flows,

With adamantine dulness arm'd,
Or tender fighs a chearing ray disclose;
If groundless fears have robb'd my foul of rest,

By Conscience, nor by thee, alarmid,
And needless fadnefs fill'd my fimple breast;

His every thought isa-gain. With eager haste my present woes destroy,

Oft have I woo'd thee, gentle power,
Dispel my fears with radiant streams of joy.

Many a solitary hour;
Be

For who, among the tuneful train,
But has indulgd the pleafing pain,

With energy refind;
SENSIBILITY.

Unknown to camps, to courts, and kings,
AN IRREGULAR ODE.

Beneath the poet's roof she fings,

And loves the humble mind.
NON TU CORPUS ERAS SINE PECTORE.

FFSPRING of the manly mind, In calm fequester'd scenes like these,
And female tenderness combin'd;

Where Contemplation fits at ease,
If e'er I bow'd beneath thy sway,

She rears her modest head;
Or felt thy animating ray,

With Gray, at evening's stillest hour,
Still thy true votary let me be,

• Near yonder ivy-mantled tower,'
Angelic Sensibility!

Oft glides with silent tread.

But far from gilded pomp the flies,
Thee, with weeping willows crown'd,

Nor e'er in princely chamber lies:
Pity, and her train, surround;

Their bosoms, arm’d with triple steel,
The Graces and the Loves are thine;

The woes of others cannot feel;
The Muse, and Music's power divine :

Absorb'd alone in public care,
At thy birth all nature smild,

No private thought can enter there!
For thou art Nature's favourite child.

Save, when, with infant-blood imbru'd, :
The fullen Passions yield to thee,

The tyrant Richard | trembling stood,
Envy Pride-o-Misanthropy:

And heard each dying groan;
In Cofrest fetters thou dost bind

Pale Conscience then her femblance took,
Rage, the tempest of the wind.

His secret foul with horror fhook,
Satan* himself, in Eden's bower,

And mark'd him for her own.'
Felt remorse, and own'd thy power;
View'd our Firft Parents with delight,

Not fo, when on th’ Atlantic mains,
Melted with pity at the fight;

Conquest crown'd Britannia's arms, Tafted awhile the joys above,

'Midit horrid shrieks and dire alarms, And almost wept with tenderness and love. And heaps of warriors flain;

* Paradise Lost. Lib. iv. Vide Speech beginning Line 358.
+ Vide Rousseau's Heloise.

Shakespeare's Richard III. A&t IV. Scene the Towers
A true Story,

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PUBLIC AMUSEMENTS.

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'HEN we intimated, on a former occa- coloured and white filk of the same pattern with rate, we meant not that Thalia should kick the ses richlyornamented with diamonds. His Royal beam. Since our last, we have had only scenes Highness the Prince of Wales had a suit of darkof woe at both theatres. Indeed, these represen- blue Geneva velvet, richly trimmed with gold lace. tations have been managed with so much art, or rather artifice, that we have been almost tempted Theatre Royal in Edinburgh, son of the well

On the 18th inft. Mr. WARD, from the to suspect that the great Katterfelto himself affisted in the conduct of our Theatres Royal. known Mrs. Ward, and who some years ago apCertain it is, that the moral and divine philofo- peared at Covent Garden Theatre in the character pher's method has been in part adopted: for, as

of Romeo, renewed his acquaintance with a Lon. hc informs his audience, when they first go to see

don audience in the part of Ranger, in the Suspihis Wonders! wonders! and wonders! that they cious Husband. Making proper allowances for the must come again, if they wish to behold

his rolar embarrassment inseparable from a firft attempt, microscope; so they, with precisely the same view,

as well as for the difficulty of the task, no actor inform those who go to see Mr. Kemble, that since Garrick having been found compleatly equal they must come again if they wish to behold his to it, we may with great justice affirm that his incomparable sister, Mrs. Siddons. Surely, this exertions deserved the plaudits with which he was is a species of trick every way unworthy of the received. managers of a theatre-royal. Let the Dramátis Personæ of many performances a few years

fince. COVENT GARDEN. be examined, and it will appear, that Mr. Powell, N the 3d of this month Mr. JOHNSTONE, Mr. Barry, Mr. Holland, Mr. Reddish, Mrs.

from the Theatre Royal, Dublin, made Yates, and Mrs. Crawford, all frequently appear- , his first appearance here in the character of Lioed in the same piece: and though the entertain- nel, in the comic opera of Lionel and Clarissa. ment was, it is true, most exquisitely delightful,

Mr. Johnstone has a good figure, with an excel. the managers thought it not too good for the pub

lent voice, and promises to be a confiderable fa. lic, nor were the public backward in giving suit

vourite. He is a native of Kilkenny, in Ireland, able encouragement to such exertions. 'There

and has been on the Dublin Atage upwards of seven was, then, no necesity, after the performances had once been announced as daily, for occasion

years. Mr. Johnstone has been married about

five years to his present wife, (formerly Miss Poia ally shutting up the theatres, through the dread of drawing up the curtain to empty benches.

tiers) who appeared at this theatre on the 17th

of last month, DRURY LANE.

On the oth inst. a new Pantomimical Ballet,

called the RIVAL KNIGHTS, was exhibited at N the 7th of this month, Mrs. WILSON

this theatre, the story of which is as follows. made her first appearance on a London Pierre de Provence, and the Princess Magustage, in the character of Phillis, in the comedy

lonne, daughter of the King of Naples, are the of the Conscious Lovers. Her figure is genteel,

hero and heroine of the piece. The Chevalier and her deportment graceful, but the poffefses, on Ferrieres rivals Pierre in her affections. The the whole, a very moderate portion of dramatic

interposition of her father's authority causes much ability.

embarrassment to the parties, and induces the On the 8th instant Mrs. SIDDONS made her princess to make her escape with Pierre. In a first theatrical entrée this season, and performed forest she is attacked by a lion; and, whilft her the part of Isabella. The dramatic excellence of lover is employed in vanquishing the beast, Ferthis lady is so well known, that we think it neede rieres, in Pierre's absence, seizes and carries her less to enter into any discussion on the subject of away. The princess now believes that Pierre is her representation, and shall content ourselves destroyed by the lion; but, in a grand tournawith observing, that the audience seemed to feel ment, wherein it is declared that the victor thall the same amazement and admiration with which be rewarded with the hand of the princess, he they were struck the first time the appeared be- steps forward in disguise, at the moment that Ferfore them, a peculiar advantage of superior ge- rieres (who had previously vanquished his opponius, which ever preserves the merit of novelty. nent) is claiming her as his promised reward. Their Majesties, accompanied by the Prince of Here a most astonishing combat takes place beWales, the Princess Royal, and Princess Au-' tween the two rivals, which terminates in favour gusta, honoured the

theatre with their presence. of the stranger; and the king, charmed with his His Majesty was dressed in a plain fuit of Quaker. address and bravery, is about to present him with coloured cloaths, with gold buttons; the Queen the princess, who is prevented from killing her. in white fattin, and her head-dress ornament- self by the unknown knight's taking off his ed with a great number of diamonds. The helmet, and proving to be Pierre de Provence. Princess Royal was dressed in a white and blue Mutual interceflions procure the king's consent figured lilk, and the Princess Augufta in a rose. to their union, and the piece concludes with the

2 Q 2

viEtor's

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AIR.SANGUINO.

victor's coronation by the princess, who is saluted Silence ! silence ! or you meet your fate; en militaire by all the knights.

Your keys, your jewels, cash, and plate! This fpecies of performance is by no means Locks, bolts, and bars, roon fly afunder, despicable. The principal performers have been Then to rifle, rob, and plunder! imported from Paris, where they belonged to the company of Monsieur Audinot, who acquired a confiderable fortune with this kind of exhibitions

On, by the spur of valour goaded, on the Boulevards.

Pistols prim'd, and carbines loaded, We wish not to prejudice ingenious men of

Courage strikes on hearts of steel: any country, but we think a British theatre stands Whilst each spark, thro’ the dark gloom of night, not in need of any foreign auxiliaries. The

Lends a clear and chearing light, Opera-house is a very sufficient receptacle for such

Who a fear or doubt can feel? fingers, dancers, and other dramatic performers,

Like serpents now thro' thickets creeping, as are not of our own country; and there, but Then on our prey like lions leaping. there only, we are always happy to see them rea

Calvetti, to the onset lead us! sonably encouraged.

Let the weary traveller dread us;

Struck with terror and amaze, On the 28th inst. Mr. CHARLES BANNI. While sword with lightning blaze. Ster performed the part of Sanguino, in the Canle Thunder to our carbines roaring, of Andalusia; on which occasion the following

Bursting clouds in torrents pouring, new songs, written by Mr. O'Keefe, and set by

Wash the sanguine dagger's blade;
Mr. Shields, were introduced.

Ours a free, a roving trade.
To the

Valour calls, and we obey!
At the peaceful midnight hour,
Every sense, and every pow'r,

On the 31st inst. Miss Younge made her Fetter'd lie in downy Neep;

appearance at this theatrey in the character of Then our careful watch we keep:

Olivia, in Mrs. Cowley's Bold Stroke for a HufWhile the wolf, in nightly prowl,

band. The performer, and the performance, are Bays the moon with hideous howl.

both too well known to need any encomium: it is Gates are barr’d; and, vain resistance, sufficient to say that both were received with the Females Thriek, but no assistance.com

usual eclat.

fet let's away,

AIR.SANGUINO.

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PAS

fufficient to support the ministers of the church HOUSE OF LORDS.

with that credit, respect, and independency, the (Continued from Page 213.)

preachers of the Gospel ought to hold. If, then,

it could not bear a diminution, their lordships MAY 30,

would surely oppose resignation-bonds, a practice ASSED the Scotch Justiciary, Leeds Ca- which, of all others, if allowed, would be most

nal, Birmingham Poor, Douglas Naviga- capable of shackling it in the highest degree; for tion, Birmingham Canal, and Duke of Norfolk's there were needy patrons always to be found, who Estates, bills.

would be glad to make the most of their presentaThe order of the day for the farther considera- tions; and till more needy clerks, whose necessim tion of the cause becween the Bishop of London ties would oblige them to obtain a living, even and Mr. Ffytche being then read

at a price that would keep them in poverty for The Bishop of St. David's expatiated on the ever. The evil, however, would not end here; it dependent situation the clergy would be thrown would affect them in a greater point, in their mo. inio should the decree be affirmed; a situation that; ral character; for while they were thus dependent on the first allowance of patronage to lords of ma- on the will perhaps of a licentious patron, they nors, and others of the laity, for building churches, must not only neglect their duty in explaining to and for other purposes, had never been thought of, him his errors, but dare not, if against his will, otherwise it would certainly have been provided fully expound that doctrine they are bound to against.

fupport; but he hoped he should never see that The Bishop of Llandaff said, that with respect time when a minister of the Church of England to the income of the clergy in general, it was should not dare to tell any man breathing his erneedless to observe, that any measure to decrease rors. Thus far be considered resignation-bonds that income in the gross would be highly injuri- in general to be of the worst consequences; and ous to the community: it was, perhaps, mort in- was sorry to observe ours was the only church in adequately divided; but that was not for their lord- which they were used. fhips present confideration. They were now to Lord Thurlow condemned the practice of give weigh, whether the revenue of the church, upon ing resignation-bonds under any circumstance the whole, was too much, and could bear to be

whatever, and moved that the decree of the Court diminished: for his part, he would not say it was of common Pleas be reversed.

The

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The Earl of Mansfield said, that with respect to read, Lord Fitzwilliam moved, that as petitions the equity of bonds of resignation, he was exactly against taxes are never received, the said petition of the opinion of the noble and learned lord, and be rejected. of the reverend prelate, but they were clearly not

Lord Tankerville thought it would be proper consistent with law; they were an ingenious eva- to state from the Woolfack, that this was the geGion, which the practice of the courts below had neral rule of the House, that the petitioners might not touched, and therefore an act of parliament not think themselves treated with disrespect. was requisite to overturn them.

This motion being put and carried, a similar The Duke of Richmond was of the same petition was brought up by Lord Sydney from the opinion.

city and corporation of London; which Lord The question being then put, a division was Fitzwilliam likewise moved should be rejected. demanded; when there appeared in favour of Lord Lord Sydney said, that being the youngeít peer Thurlow's motion that the decree be reversed.. in the House, it might appear presumptuous in For it

19

him to arraign a standing order of the House; Against it

but he could scarce believe that any such order Majority

existed, as it would, in his opinion, be highly imAfter which the House adjourned.

proper, as well as injurious; for in what light JUNE 3.

muft their lordships be considered by the public, . Read a first time the Kilburn and St. Giles's when they understood that they were not to exRoad bills.

pect redrets; nay, that the House itself had a Reported the Vagabonds bill.

standing order against all such complaints? It Received Bayntun's Divorce bill, with amend- was certainly incumbent on their lordships, when ments, from the Commons; which, after some lit- applied to by so numerous and respectable a part tle altercation, were agreed to, and the bill passed, of the community, to pay some attention to their JUNE 5..

petitions, especially when worded with proper rePassed the St. Martin's Paving, Odstock and Tpect to that House; and neither to reject them Bilfton Inclosure, and Chatteris Road, bills. on the principle of their being contrary to a stand

Read a first time the Pay Office Reform, with ing order, or from the idea which was pretty geseveral other bills from the Commons.

nerally entertained, that their lordships were not The judges gave their opinion in the case of competent to make alterations in a money.

-bill. Fanshaw and Cocksedge, in favour of the defen- The Duke of Chandos reprobated the idea of dant; after which Lord Thurlow rose, and stated their lordships not being competent to make al. his reasons for differing from them; but, declin, terations in any bill that might be sent up from ing making any motion on the subject, the ques- the other House, provided their lordships found tion was put, and the decree affirmed.

such alterations necessary, and agreeable to the Adjourned till Monday se’nnight.

wishes and interests of the public at large.

Lord Walsingham thought, that if the House Their lordships having met, pursuant to ad- once received petitions against taxes, great incoajournment, went through in committee, and re- veniences would ensue, as it was impossible to ported, the bill for punishing Vagabonds, calling levy a tax which would not be felt by some. On themselves Egyptians.

this account, therefore, he thought it adviseable Read a first time the Whitechapel Paving, to reject the present petitions. Shrewsbury Small Debts, and Tax Receipt, bills. L'ird Ferrers said, he rose not only to support

Ordered that the Lords be fummonej for the the petition, but the dignity of the House. Howe morrow, to consider of the message to be pre- it could be supposed that their lordships were not sented from the King for the establishment of the empowered to make alterations in maney-bills, Houshold of his Royal Highness the Prince of he could not conceive; or from what principle the Wales,

other House had assumed to itself the right of JUNE 17.

framing taxes to which the Lords were to give Read a first time the Vagrant bill. A second their asient, without being at liberty to judge time, the Receipt, Whitechapel Paving, and se. whether they were proper or improper. veral other bills.

Lord Mansfield observed, that the question be. Went through, in committee, with amend. fore their lordships was, whether the petition ments, the Pay Office Reform bill.

should be received or rejected? and not the merita Reported the Paddington Road bill.

or demerits of the tax; the proper time for which Palled the Vagabond Egyptians bill.

would be when the bill came under confideration. , The Duke of Portland said, that as he under- With respect to rejecting the petition, on the suptood the business which had been expected to position that there was a standing order that none come before their lord thips, and for which they should be received, this was a mistake; he knew had been summoned, was postponed, he should of no such order; but, from the inconvenience move for the adjournment of the House, which that would attend such petitions, it had long been he did; and the House adjourned accordingly. the custom, not only of that House, but also of

the other, to reject every petition that might be Palled the Pay Office Reform, Hull Gaol, and introduced against a tax; and this custom he Paddington and Kilburn Road, bills.

thought very judicious; for if petitions once found T'he petition from the merchants and traders their way into either House, no session could be of London against the tax on receipts being then long enough to get through the supplies.

Lord

JUNE 16.

JUNE 18.

.

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