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THE

SCHOOL READER.

TIFTH BOOK.

DESIGNED AS A SEQUEL TO SANDERS' FOURTH READER.

PART FIRST,

CONTAINING FULL INSTRUCTIONS IN THE RHETORICAL PRINCIPLES OF

READING OR SPEAKING, ILLUSTRATED BY NUMEROUS EXAMPLES.

PART SECOND,

CONSISTING OF ELEGANT EXTRACTS IN PROSE AND POETRY FROM VARIOUS
ELOQUENT WRITERS, ACCOMPANIED WITH NOTES, EXPLANATORY
UF SUCI HISTORICAL OR CLASSICAL ALLUSIONS, AS THE

SEVERAL LESSONS CONTAIN.

FOR THE USE OF ACADEMIES

AND THE

HIGHEST CLASSES IN COMMON AND SELECT SCHOOLS

BY CHARLES W. SANDERS, A.M.

AND

JOSHUA C. SANDERS, A.M.

NEW-YORK.
PUBLISHED BY NEWMAN AND IVISON,

178 FULTON STREET,
CINCINNATI: MOORE & ANDERSON. AUBURN: J. C. IVISON & CO.

CHICAGO: S. C. GRIGGS & CO.

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According to Act of Congress, in the year Eighteen Hundred and Forty-Eight

BY CHARLES W. AND J. C. SANDERS, In the Clerk's Office fo the District Court of the United States, for the Southem

District of New York,

THOMAS B. SMITR, STEREOTYPER.

216 WILLIAX STREET, N. Y.

J. D. BIDFORD, PRINTER,

138 TULTOX STREET.

PREFACE.

The increased attention which Elocutionary Science is now receiving in schools of all ranks, induces the Authors to present the following work as a SEQUEL to the Series, now so extensively known to the public. In offering this volume as the Fifth Reader in the Series, it is not to be inferred that the preceding ones have been found insufficient, in affording the student the necessary facilities for becoming a good, practical reader. But the most satisfactory evidence to the contrary is afforded in the increasing popularity of those works. It is mainly designed to present to the student new LESSONS for his continued practice, since it is only by such exercise that he will be able to retain whatever skill he may already have acquired in reading or speaking, as well as continue to advance toward that perfection, to which he may approximate, though he may never be able fully to attain.

As a general truth, the scholar is allowed to read too much in school to enable him to becoine skillful in the art. It is a maxim that “what is worth doing at all, is worth doing well,” which is peculiarly applicable to the subject of reading. One paragraph read with care and attention,the sentiment of it thoroughly understood, -the intonation of the voice in the utterance rendered clear, full, and expressive, “will prove an exercise far more useful than hurriedly passing over numerous pages in a thoughtless manner.

The instructions in the SCIENCE of reading or speaking, contained in Part First of this work, will be found minute and full, inore so than the limits of the Fourth Reader would allow. The examples for illustration and exercise, accompanying these instructions, are numerous, and have heen selected from various elegant writers in prose and poetry.

The lessons which form Parr SECOND, have been selected, for the most part, EXPRESSLY FOR Tas work, with reference to their adaptation to illustrate the rhetorical principles of reading or speaking, as well as to elegance in both sentiment and style of the composition. Whatever has been deemed most worthy in these respects, has been chosen without particular reference to the source whence it emanated,-acknowledging the gold as genuine from whatever mine taken.

These lessons are equally adapted for reading or speaking. A mistaken

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