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Shakespeare Society, and to be had of W. Skeffington, 1846

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91. oldal - Romeo; and, when he shall die, Take him and cut him out in little stars, And he will make the face of heaven so fine That all the world will be in love with night And pay no worship to the garish sun.
91. oldal - Phoebus' lodging ; such a waggoner As Phaeton would whip you to the west, And bring in cloudy night immediately. — Spread thy close curtain, love-performing night ! That rude day's eyes may wink, and Romeo Leap to these arms, untalk'd of and unseen. — Lovers can see to do their amorous rites By their own beauties : or if love be blind, It best agrees with night. — Come...
33. oldal - Which from the world is hidden. Go, pretty birds, and tell her so; See that your notes strain not too low: For still, methinks, I see her frown ' Ye pretty wantons, warble. Go, tune your voices' harmony, And sing, I am her lover; Strain loud and sweet, that every note With sweet content may move her. And she that hath the sweetest voice, Tell her I will not change my choice ; Yet still, methinks, I see her frown Ye pretty wantons, warble.
33. oldal - Go, pretty birds, about her bower ; Sing, pretty birds, she may not lower ; Ah, me ! methinks I see her frown ! Ye pretty wantons, warble. Go, tell her, through your chirping bills, As you by me are bidden, To her is only known my love, Which from the world is hidden. Go, pretty birds, and tell her so ; See that your notes strain not too low, 96 For still, methinks, I see her frown. Ye pretty wantons, warble. Go, tune your voices...
91. oldal - Phesbus, drawn in his car with fiery-footed steeds, and posting through the heavens, she very properly calls him, with regard to the swiftness of his course, the run-away. In the like manner our poet speaks of the night in The Merchant of Venice: " For the close night doth play the run-away.
9. oldal - For. Dost long to have me blind ? Then I'll behold them, since I know thy mind. Oh, me, is this my son that doth so senseless lie, And swims in blood ? my soul with his shall fly Unto the land of rest.
48. oldal - Follow them to the tavern ; and there sit In the next room with a calves-head and brimstone, And overhear their talk, observe their humours : Collect their jests, put them into a play, And tire them too with payment, to behold What I have filch'd from them. This I could do : But oh, for shame that men should so arraign Their own fee-simple wits for verbal theft ? Yet men there be that have done this and that, And more by much more than the most of them.

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