The Works of the Right Honourable Joseph Addison: The Spectator [no. 487-600] The Guardian. The Lover. The present state of the war. The trial and conviction of Count Tariff. The Whig-examiner. The Freeholder [no. 1-30

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H. G. Bohn, 1854 - 8 oldal
 

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30. oldal - Knowing that you was my old master's good friend, I could not forbear sending you the melancholy news of his death, which has afflicted the whole country, as well as his poor servants, who loved him, I may say, better than we did our lives. I am afraid he caught his death the last...
123. oldal - I knew a man in Christ above fourteen years ago, (whether in the body, I cannot tell ; or whether out of the body, I cannot tell : God knoweth ;) such an one caught up to the third heaven.
4. oldal - They mount up to the heaven, they go down again to the depths: their soul is melted because of trouble." "They reel to and fro, and stagger like a drunken man, and are at their wits
477. oldal - She openeth her mouth with wisdom, and in her tongue is the law of kindness. She looketh well to the ways of her household, and eateth not the bread of idleness. Her children arise up and call her blessed, her husband also, and he praiseth her.
85. oldal - ... of them who did not think the new blemish, as soon as she had got it into her possession, much more disagreeable than the old one. I made the same observation on every other misfortune or calamity, which every one in the assembly brought upon himself, in...
255. oldal - What choice to choose for delicacy best, What order so contrived as not to mix Tastes, not well joined, inelegant, but bring Taste after taste upheld with kindliest change...
45. oldal - ... in ourselves, got the ideas of existence and duration, of knowledge and power, of pleasure and happiness, and of several other qualities and powers, which it is better to have than to be without ; when we would frame an idea the most suitable we can to the Supreme Being, we enlarge every one of these with our idea of infinity ; and so putting them together, make our complex idea of God.
180. oldal - The ascending pile Stood fixed her stately height, and straight the doors, Opening their brazen folds discover, wide Within, her ample spaces o'er the smooth And level pavement ; from the arched roof, Pendent by subtle magic, many a row Of starry lamps and blazing cressets, fed With naphtha and asphaltus, yielded light As from a sky.
85. oldal - ... from the choice they had made. A poor galley slave, who had thrown down his chains, took up the gout in their stead, but made such wry faces, that one might easily perceive he was no great gainer by the bargain. It was pleasant enough to see the several exchanges that were made, for sickness against poverty, hunger against want of appetite, and care against pain.
108. oldal - Maker's presence, from the secret effects of his mercy and goodness, we must keep such a watch over all our thoughts, that, in the language of the Scripture, his soul may have pleasure in us. We must take care not to grieve his Holy Spirit, and endeavour to make the meditations of our hearts , always acceptable in his sight, that he may delight thus to reside and dwell in us. The light of nature could direct Seneca to this- doctrine, in a very remarkable passage among his epistles : " Sacer inest...

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