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rease made the was swean she put beful that Death Sharer' fear of 11

her death to think of the Sharers with the spot. It is thought that she had out it. I feel that without Alosha Ban soaked her clothes with kerosene. In the Sharers would have been more the afternoon of the second day folreasonable. But would more reason lowing her disappearance, Kate Cotton have made them more effective? The received a letter from her, which had Ice Age Bubble was swelling before our been postmarked on the day of her eyes at the very time when she put her disappearance. It said in a few words self to death in that most fearful that she had from the first resolved to fashion. Who can say what the thrill be a Death Sharer, but had concealed of wonder and of horror at her death her intentions for fear of interference might have done, or not have done, with her plans. without the mingled sense of wonder She added, “Will not some other and of dread that was current at that white woman, especially some young time, about the future of this planet and happy woman, share as I do the and of the whole race of man?

death of the next man lynched in her The Telemarks had moved to Texas community? I leave my fellow women shortly after the Sharers had been this in trust.' organized. I think they went first to The letter closed with saying, Fort Worth, and then to Waco. I knew 'Death perhaps is not so terrible to of their being in Waco as early as an Oriental. Mohammedans are vivJanuary 1929. There Mr. Telemark idly aware of Paradise. fell in with two or three old friends of Kate instantly gave out the letter his, whom he had not seen since for publication. Immediately she bachelor days. He now began to see a found herself the centre of a storm of great deal of these old friends. The condemnation from parents and clergynewspaper accounts of Alosha Ban's men and others for giving out the letdeath said that he had been out very ter. They also bitterly condemned the late on the previous night, and that newspapers for printing it. Others one at least of those old friends of his again condemned these clergymen and was believed to have taken part in the parents for calling any further attenhorrible lynching of Henry Major. tion to the letter and the suicide; and Henry Major was burned alive that for some time there raged a considernight, in the presence of a large crowd able dispute as to how best to consign of spectators. He was an elderly Negro the letter to oblivion. Alosha Ban was of poor reputation, who was accused of everywhere condemned as a fanatic, a having spoken familiarly to a young monster of asceticism, indeed a maniac. white woman, and was believed to have Among the young women of all lands intended to assault her. He struck the whose imaginations were fired to fever young woman's father when accused heat by her death and challenge was a by him.

young Frenchwoman, a student of The certain facts about Alosha Ban medicine at the Sorbonne. This young are that she disappeared from her home woman as a child had known Jean on the afternoon following the lynch- Jaurès and she had seen him on the ing, and that her burnt and blackened very day of his assassination. It had body was found lashed with wires to a affected her strongly, and she had been broken fence-rail close beside the body considered peculiar ever since. of the burned Negro. It was found by This Marie-Jeanne Fischer now a party of sightseers who had gone out called together some of her friends on the second morning after, to view and colleagues and they banded themselves into an order exclusively of the Sharers could accomplish. For consider Death Degree, to share the extremities what they had already done. Housing of war. Their vow was that for every improvements in England and America person ever killed by the French army were already immense, even before the in war, whether by direct slaughter or Rio meeting. No one denies that the by blockade, one of them would die in prisons of the Orient in general were imitation of the death of that other greatly improved — and few deny that ‘so long,' their manifesto declared, the protest of the Chinese women had ‘as our little numbers last.

been the means of it. Personally I This, and not the Argentine legend, believe the Sharers would have ended was the beginning of that wild order of war without any Recommendation Enemy Death Sharers, which within at all. six months had its hundreds of mem- Imagine a young married man going bers in Germany, Italy, and France, off to war, suspecting that his wife its thousands in Japan and India intended to imitate by her own death (twelve thousand, it used to be the death of the first man she could thought, in Burmah alone), and its discover that he had killed. Imagine a smaller, but still determined, groups general in the army having one of his in the Anglo-Saxon countries. There own daughters forcibly fed while he were, I have been told, about two was carrying out a punitive blockade thousand in Mexico and South Ameri- against some rebellious subject tribe in ca combined. What lent the most Africa! terrible power to the order was its Ah well! it is easier, in these days, to practice of keeping its list of members imagine that than to imagine the secret and merely announcing the total Frenchman going to war without any number in the country, and the pledge protest from his wife and fellow they had taken. Though they are countrywomen, or the British or Geroften accused of having published man general embarked on his punitive vastly swollen estimates of their num- expedition with the applause of his bers, and of joining without intending gentle daughters. And what matter, to do more than scare the Government, now, who ended war, or how, or who subsequent investigations of their made the dismal streets gay and emrecords seem to bear out the original bellished the less comely lives among statements pretty well. No doubt, if us, and established the unwritten they had been put to the dreadful test, constitution of the Family Order, many would have faltered and left the ‘To everyone according to his need. order. But what anxious father could And yet I think, in the bottom of my be sure that his daughter was not heart, that it does matter, for the sake among the steadfast few who would of the unborn, whether we composed not falter?

ourselves into this family life together I almost wish the Recommendation because of the breath of an iceberg of the Rio meeting might have been blowing over us, or because of a great delayed a year or two, so that the illumination of illogical and immeasurworld might have seen what the able sisterly love.

PROSPECTING IN NEW GUINEA

BY ROBERT M. MACDONALD

New GUINEA, or Papua, as the largest latter was the desire to govern the island in the world is variously called, country for its own people's good and, promises to be the Klondike of if possible, to allow the natives to the future. Nev. finds of gold are develop it themselves, aided by such being made daily in its vast, mysterious civilizing influences as education, trade, interior, and at present men from all and missionary enterprise. But this parts of the world are converging on influence did not extend beyond the Port Moresby and Samarai, its chief coast and it was left to the prospector ports, whence they will proceed up the who — despite warnings and very rivers to the scenes of the latest dis- often strenuous opposition — forced coveries. Yet gold has been found in his way inland, to teach the savage New Guinea for the past thirty years, tribes to respect the white man. In and prospectors dared its fierce time those inland tribes did learn to cannibalistic tribes and pierced the respect the white man and showed that mighty mountain ranges in its heart fact on every possible occasion by before the news of the great wealth of eating him so as to inherit his virtues! the Alaskan fields startled the world. New Guinea is a land of enormous But prospectors, then as now, did not possibilities. It is well watered by care to develop mines; the early rivers, is blessed with rich soil, and pioneers merely washed out the pre- contains, indigenous to the country, cious metal from the river beds and most natural tropical growths that are passed on, ever hoping to find deposits of value. The science of man has from which they might snatch a fortune almost conquered the fevers which in a day. And sometimes they nearly hang round the coastal belt and over accomplished this feat; for on the the inland marshes, and the natives famous Yodda Valley fields each man are becoming more tractable. Miningmade over fifty ounces per day, and camps are expanding into townships, only the unreasoning hostility of the roads and telegraph lines are being natives and deadly fevers made it made, and possibly there may soon be impossible for them to continue work- railways. Samarai, on an island at the ing until their dreams were realized. extreme southeast of the mainland, has

The Queensland Government, which already eclipsed Port Moresby as the administered the British part of the chief port of the Possession, and it is island, did not by any means encourage fast becoming, in nature, a second the adventurous gold-seeker. There Port Said or Thursday Island. From were reasons for this attitude, some not its busy wharves coasting steamers easily understood but some prompted run regularly to the mouths of the by the highest motives. Chief of the Mambare, Kumusi, and Gira rivers on the east coast. On the upper reaches last-named river's headwaters farther and headwaters of those rivers are up among the foothills. Birds of the great gold deposits now attracting paradise of gorgeous plumage and the world's attention. The origin of noisy parrots of all description fitted the gold there baffles all explanation, about everywhere. Wild pigs were as yet, but those who go to that region abundant and fish were plentiful in all do not usually trouble themselves the streams. Native bees and leeches about that matter. Newcomers can made life very unpleasant during the always earn all their requirements day, and at night mosquitoes and easily around any existing camp, while jigger fleas paid us unwelcome attenthose more daring and experienced can tion. The bee and the jigger were the still find all the sensations they want worst, however; the former does not in the more remote gorges and unknown sting, but in its craving for salt it creeks. The township of Tamata is the sucks deep into the perspiring skin largest gold-fields town, but the old and raises painful blisters thereon. Yodda Valley camp still rivals it The latter playfully burrows under the closely in extent of population, and toe nails, when it gets a chance, and probably the camps on the scenes of deposits eggs which hatch as if by the new rushes, among the Albert . magic. Very drastic measures have to Edward Ranges and further north in be taken when the jigger flea finds the old German territory, will soon a home. But despite everything, and outclass both. The prospector in those by making detours to avoid native regions still trusts to his rifle for villages, we forced our way ahead, protection, quinine for health, and his and one day found ourselves on the luck for fortune; and if the first two bank of a swiftly flowing stream do not fail, the third will not desert which, doubtless, joined the Kumusi him.

somewhere.

We sat that night in the smoke of our

camp-fire so as to escape the ravages Not very long ago a party of us set of the night pests, and to discuss matout from Tamata to prospect the ters. We had crossed a native pad durfoothills of the Owen Stanley Ranges. ing the afternoon and knew that a Most of us had had experience on all village could not be far away, but the chief fields of the world and we we had also struck 'good' gold in the thought we could at least look after bed of the waterway beside us, and ourselves, although the news had just we hoped to prove its value before we reached Tamata of the massacre of passed on. Macrae's party by the natives. We 'I fancy we are in the heart of the totaled seven and employed a dozen Papangi country now,' said Big Sam, carrier ‘boys' belonging to a timid as he kicked a centipede into the fire. coastal tribe which had been half civi- 'It was reported they were seeing red lized by the missionaries. Our first when we left Tamata.' week's journey was through country “I suppose it is useless trying to make already known, but when we crossed friends with them?' the Professor sugthe Ope River and the pestilential gested. marshes left by its periodical overflows Boston Bob laughed. 'A Papangi we broke fresh ground. We were now likes the white man,' he said, “but he on the divide between the Ope and the likes him best roasted. Kumusi and were heading to hit the 'It was up about here that Macrae's

Even Tamata

Stanley Rangeli village coso struck “goo beside us,

party was wiped out,’ Sydney Charlie head gracing the top end of a bamboo put in cheerfully.

pole,' Boston Bob commented. “But "That is one reason why I am here, I know you don't mean to be funny, I said. ‘Mac was my dearest friend.' John L. S. Chalmers, although your

‘Mac was everyone's friend,' the words are.' Doctor added, slowly, 'The Papangis “We had better set about building have got to give me ten of their best — a stockade,' suggested Big Sam. “They for him.'

could surround us among the trees and None of us had ever known the Doc- spear us without showing themselves.' tor to be of a revengeful nature and his “No!' Silent Ted ejaculated. 'Pawords surprised us.

pangisare water fighters; they'll come in We were certainly an odd combina- their war-canoes. We 'll go to them —' tion. The Professor was a New Zea- ‘Nonsense, Ted; we are not looking lander, highly cultured and of scientific for trouble,' the Professor broke in — training. He was as gentle-looking and much to our regret, for Ted had never as tough as Boston Bob and Big Sam before been known to speak so much were tough-looking but gentle. Boston at a time. Bob and Big Sam had been with me in After some discussion, however, we Alaska and elsewhere. Sydney Charlie saw that Ted's advice was good. We was a famous New Guinean pioneer, could leave our camp, with logs inside and Silent Ted was a man of mystery our mosquito nets, and fires burning to who very rarely spoke but who was show its position. The natives, as was always a sheet anchor in any emer their custom, would spear the camp gency. While we were thinking, each from the water while we were nearer deep in his own thoughts, our chief their village than they dreamed, and, carrier came forward from the boys with luck, we might be able to get hold fire and signified he wished to speak of one of their tabu priests, if any

'Fire away,' someone told him, and stayed behind the raiding party. He he began.

would be a hostage whose presence with ‘Me, John Livingstone Stanley Chal- us would mean a lot, for well we knew mers, mighty big chief down among the strange tabu law of the natives: Koitapu people in Port Moresby. Me He who touches anything tabu becomes Christian an' got good educate. Me no' tabu himself, and this is often exeat white fellow nor any fellow —' tremely awkward. Of course we did not

'Yes, John Livingstone Stanley doubt that the people of the village Chalmers, we know all that,' Sydney were well aware of our proximity. Very Charlie interrupted. 'Cut out your soon we decided upon our plan of action, family history and tell us what is trou. and, leaving our fire heaped high with bling you.'

logs, we made toward the village, keep'Well, me smell Papangi fellow now. ing in the thick of the dense vegetaMe know him's smell. Me been up here tion and about a hundred feet away before, chief carrier with other gold- from the river. Our carriers — excepthunting fellows. They all gets heads ing the chief — were paralyzed with stuck on poles by Papangi an' only me fear and ready to run at the first sign get away. Big village near here an' of danger. your heads will be on poles round the tabu dubu (sacred house) before mornin', if you no' get away.'

We were greatly surprised at the 'I don't seem to fancy my handsome silence, for usually the sound of native

ill gets heard from and abo tabu duvads will bellage near only me ing the

Your bay. Baby Phey all other here

III

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