History of Ancient Philosophy II, A: Plato and Aristotle

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In this book Reale presents Plato and Aristotle.

At the center of Reale s interpretation of Plato is the fulcrum of the supersensible, the metaphysical discovery that Plato presented as a result of the Second Voyage. This discovery of the supersensible is, in Reale s view, not only the fundamental phase of ancient thought, but it also constitutes a milestone on the path of western philosophy.

Reale presents Plato in three different dimensions: the theoretic, the mystical-religious, and the political. Each of these components takes on meaning from the Second Voyage. In addition, Reale has shown that only in the light of the Unwritten Doctrines handed down through the indirect tradition, do these three components, and the Second Voyage itself, acquire their full meaning, and only in this way is a unitary conception of Plato s thought achieved.

The interpretation of Aristotle that Reale proposes depends on his interpretation of Plato. Aristotle read without preconceptions is not the antithesis of Plato. Reale points out that Aristotle was unique among thinkers close to Plato, in being the one who developed, at least in part, his Second Voyage. The systematic-unitary interpretation of Aristotle which Reale has previously supported converges with the new systematic-unitary interpretation of Plato. Certain doctrinal positions which are usually reserved to treatments in monographs will be explored, because only in this way can the two distinctive traits of Aristotle s thought emerge: the way in which he tries to overcome and confirm the Socratic-Platonic positions, and the way in which he formally creates the system of philosophical knowledge.
 

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Tartalomjegyzék

First Section
5
5 The selftestimony contained in the Seventh Letter
11
Significance characteristics and purpose
17
The Important Problems that Have Beset the Interpre
23
The Second Voyage as a Journey from the Physical
37
The Platonic Theory of Ideas and Some Problems
47
3
55
The Unwritten Doctrines of the First Principles and the Highest
65
The Man of the State Written Laws and Constitutions
215
The Second State of the Laws
221
Fifth Section
229
Some Summits of the Thought of Plato Remain
237
Second Part
245
The Truthfulness of the Second Voyage
253
The Basic Differences between Aristotle and Plato
259
Metaphysics
265

That Plato Makes to the Doctrine of the Principles
77
The Doctrine of the Demiurge and Cosmology
95
Epistemology and Dialectic
117
The protologic system of dialectic hinges on the one
126
PLATONIC THOUGHT AND ITS NEXUSES WITH
137
The New Moral Asoetic
157
The Mysticism of Philia and Eros
169
Plato a Prophet?
175
Fourth Section
183
The Republic or the Construction of the Ideal CityState
189
Demonstration of the existence of the immobile Movent
285
God and the world
291
Mathematics
313
Politics
337
Fourth Section
349
Rhetoric
367
Poetics
377
CONCLUSIONS ABOUT ARISTOTELIAN PHILOSOPHY
383
Notes
393
Copyright

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A szerzőről

Giovanni Reale is Professor and holder of the Chair in History of Ancient Philosophy at the Catholic University of Milan.

John R. Catan is Professor of Philosophy at the State University of New York, College at Brockport.

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