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“Don't go there !" was the warning sourt;
“The pipes bave all burst underground,
The raging torrent's deep and wide;"
But loud his trumpet voice replied,

Char-co-o-al!
“Oh stop !" good Biddy cried, “and lave
A brimful peck upon this pave."
A smile his inky face came o'er,
And on he went with louder roar,

Char-co-o-al!
“Beware of Main street crossing deep,
Away from Walnut gutter keep!"
This was the sweeper's only greet,
A voice replied far up the street,

Char-co-o-all
At set of sun, as homeward went,
The joyous men of cent per cent,
Counting the dollars in their till,
A voice was heard, both loud and shrill,

Char-co-o-al !
A man upon the watchman's round,
Half-steeped in mud and ice was found,
Shouting with voice, though not so strong,
That awful word which leads my song,

Char-co-o-al!
There in the gaslight, dim and gray,
Dreaming unconsciously he lay,
And from his nose, turned up still more,
Came sounding like a thrilling suore-

Char-co-o-al!

AMBITION.- LORD BYRON.

He who ascends to mountain tops shall find

The lostiest peaks most wrapt in clouds and snow: He, who surpasses or subdues mankind,

Must look down on the late of those below. Though high above the sun of glory glow,

And far beneath the earth and ocean spread, Round him are icy rocks, and loudly blow

Contending tempests on his naked head ; And thus reward the toils which to those summits led. CROSSING THE CARRY.-Rev. W. H. H. MURRAY.

BCENE,—The Adirondacks during a shower. A pleasure-seeker and his guide

on the road.

John,” said I, as we stood looking at each other across the boat, “this rain is wet.”

“It generally is, up in this region, I believe,” he responded, as he wiped the water out of his eyes with the back of his hand, and shook the accumulating drops from nose and chin; “but the waterproof I have on has lasted me some thirty-eight years, and I don't think it will wet through to-day.”

"Well!" I exclaimed," there is no use of standing here in this marsh-grass any longer; help me to load up. I'll take the baggage, and you the boat.”

“You'll never get through with it, if you try to take it all at once. Better load light, and I'll come back after what's left," was the answer. “I tell you,” be continued, “the swamp is full of water, and soft as muck."

“John," said I, "that baggage is going over at one load, sink or swim, live or die, survive or perish. I'll make the attempt, swamp or no swamp. My life is assured against accidents by fire, water, and mud; so here goes. What's life to glory!" I exclaimed, as I seized the pork-bag, and dragged it from under the boat; "stand by and see me put my armor on.”

Over my back I slung the provision basket, made like a fisherman's creel, thirty inches by forty, filled with plates, coffee, salt, and all the impedimenta of camp and cooking utensils. This was held in its place by straps passing over the shoulders and under the arms, like a Jew-pedler's pack. There might have been eighty rounds' weight in it.Upon the top of the basket, John lasbed my knapsack, full of bullets, powder, and clothing. My rubber suit and heavy blanket, slung around my neck by a leather thong, hung down in front across my chest. On one shoulder the oars and paddles were balanced, with a frying-pan and gridiron swinging from the blades; on the other was my rifle, from which were suspended i pair of boots, my creel, a coffee-pot, and a bag of flour.

66

“Don't go there !" was the warning sourd;
“The pipes bave all burst underground,
The raging torrent's deep and wide ;"
But loud his trumpet voice replied,

Char-co-o-al!
“Oh stop !” good Biddy cried, “and lave
A brimful peck upon this pave."
A smile his inky face came o'er,
And on he went with louder roar,

Char-co-o-al!
“Beware of Main street crossing deep,
Away from Walnut gutter keep!"
This was the sweeper's only greet,
A voice replied far up the street,

Char-co-o-all
At set of sun, as homeward went,
The joyous men of cent per cent,
Counting the dollars in their till,
A voice was heard, both loud and shrill,

Char-co-o-al !

A man upon the watcliman's round,
Half-steeped in mud and ice was found,
Shouting with voice, theugh not so strong,
That awful word which beads my song,

Char-co-o-al!

There in the gaslight, dim and gray,
Dreaming unconsciously he lay,
And from his nose, turned up still more,
Came sounding like a thrilling store-

Char-co-o-al!

AMBITION.-LORD BYRON.

He who ascends to mountain tops shall find

The loftiest peaks most wrapt in clouds and show: ble, who swpasses or subdues mankind,

Must look down on the late of those below. Though high above the sun of glory glow,

Ard far beneath the earth and ocean spread, Round liim are icy rocks, and loudly blow

Contending tempests on his naked head ; And thus reward the toils which to those summits led. CROSSING THE CARRY.-Rev. W. II. H. MURRAY.

BCENE.-The Adirondacks during a shower. A pleasure-seeker and his guide

on the road.

“John," said I, as we stood looking at each other across the boat, “this rain is wet.”

"It generally is, up in this region, I believe," he responded, as he wiped the water out of his eyes with the back of his hand, and shook the accumulating drops from nose and chin; “ but the waterproof I have on has lasted me some thirty-eight years, and I don't think it will wet through to-day.”

"Well !" I exclaimed, "there is no use of standing here in this marsh-grass any longer; help me to load up. I'll take the baggage, and you the boat.”

You'll never get through with it, if you try to take it all at once.

Better load light, and I'll come back after what's left," was the answer. “I tell you,” be continued, “the

swamp is full of water, and soft as muck." “John,” said I, “that baggage is going over at one load, sink or swim, live or die, survive or perish. I'll make the attempt, swamp or no swamp. "My life is assured against accidents by fire, water, and mud; so here goes. What's life to glory!" I exclaimed, as I seized the pork-bag, and dragged it from under the boat; "stand by and see me put my armor on.”

Over my back I slung the provision basket, made like a fisherman's creel, thirty inches by forty, filled with plates, coflee, salt, and all the impedimenta of camp and cooking utensils. This was held in its place by straps passing over the shoulders and under the arms, like a Jew-pedler's pack. There might have been eighty younds' weight in it. Upon the top of the basket, John lashed my knapsack, full of bullets, powder, and clothing. My rubber suit and heavy blanket, slung around my neck by a leather thong, hung down in front across my chest. On one shoulder the oars and paddles were balanced, with a frying-pan and gridiron swinging from the blades; on the other was my rifle, from which were suspended is pair of boots, my creel, a coffee-pot, and a bag of four.

“Don't go there !" was the warning sourd;
“The pipes have all buust underground,
The raging torrent's deep and wide ;'
But loud lis trumpet voice replied,

Char-co-o-al!
“Oh stop !" good Biddy cried, “and lave
A brimful peck upon this pave.”
A smile his inky face came o’er,
Aud on he went with louder roar,

Char-co-o-al !
“ Beware of Main street crossing deep,
Away from Walnut gutter keep!"
This was the sweeper's only greet,
A voice replied far up the street,

Char-co-o-all
At set of sun, as homeward went,
The joyous men of cent per cent,
Counting the dollars in their till,
A voice was heard, both loud and shrill,

Char-co-o-al !
A man upon the watchman's round,
Half-steeped in mud and ice was found,
Shouting with voice, theugh not so stroog,
That awful word which leads my song,

Char-co-o-al!
There in the gaslight, dim and gray,
Dreaming unconsciously he lay,
And from his nose, turned up still more,
Came sounding like a thrilling snore-

Char-co-o-al!

AMBITION.---LORD BYRON.

He who ascends to mountain tops shall find

The loftiest peaks most wrapt in clouds and Hle, who suupasses or subdues mankind,

Must look down on the late of those below. Though high above the sun of glory glow,

And far beneath the carth and ocean spread, Round him are icy rocks, and loudly blow

Contending tempests on lis naked head; And thus reward the toils which to those summits led.

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