Oldalképek
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ePub

Augu.

Thesmom.
Barometer.
Wind.
Rain.

Weather.
Inch. 200hs

100ths of inch.

Days.

58

58

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61 29 13

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clouds. $9 29 II

clouds and showers. 3 29 13

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thowers, bright, thunder thówem. 4 62

29 14
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. 19 bright, showers in the night.
5
29 18 W

bright. 57 29 16

.45 cloudy'. 55 29 4

S

.60 raio, stormy. 54 29 4

W

cloudy, rain. 9 55 29 14

W

cloudy. 10 53 29 14

W

cloudy. 53 29 17

W

overcaft.
$1

29
16
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overcast.
13
29

.115

grey, sun, clouds, dark raio. 14 60 SW

rain, Itroog gales. 15 59 29 7 SW

grey, mild, sprinkling dark rain. 16 63 29 5

SW-W

.35

rain, fun, and fi rong gales.
17
59

29
4
SW

heavy showers, fun, ftrong gales.
29 9
NW-IV

sua and clouds, with Atrong galos. 19 57 29 WSW

fun and white clouds. 3
59 29
SWS

fun and clouds. 4
63 29
8 SW-S

fofc weather.
62

29
8 SE-S

sun, rain, il under.
23
60
29
SW

. 106 fun, thowers. 24

29
8
SW

funn, rains
25
62
29 12
SW

fun, thowers. eb. 61

29
SIV

small showers, brisk gales. 27 59

29 7
SW-W

rain. 28

29 7
NW

fon, cold air.
29
54
29
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run, rainbow. 30 29

fon and clouds. 31 5+

16
W

fun aod cloads. OBSERVATIONS. "Rain strongly electric. unusual with so moist an air.—2 Linnets congres gate --3 Mulbrooms pale and tasteless.-- + Wheat harveit

. -5 First broods of martins congregare 6 Wheat harvett gencral.N. B. The register and observations, after the 12th, were inade at a village 50 miles S. W of London, luy posed to be about 300 feet above high-watermark. Thermometer oa a fhady claircase. Rain-measurer four feet from the ground.

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HOME. OXFORD. NIIDLAND.NORFOLK, NORTHERN WESTERN SUMMER CIRCUIT. E.Mansfield L. Loughbo CE Skynner). Allihuza. B. Eyre.

B. Perry.. 1783 J. Gould.

J. Nares. | J. Willes. jis. Hlutham. J. Böller. J. Heath, Mon. Jul.28

Abingdon
Tuesday, 25
Northampt.

Winchester Wednel. 30

Oxford
Frid, Aug. 1

Okehamn
Saturday 2
Worc&City Linc.& City

York & City South a. &Sai Monday 4 Hertford

Buckingha.
Wedneld. 6Chelmsford Glou.& City
Thursday 7
Nort&Town Bedford

Dorchester Saturday 9

Monmouth Derby Huntiogdon Monday 1 Maidstone

Cambridge

Exon & City Tuesday 12 Hereford

Durham Wednesd.13

Leic. & Bor. Thursday 14

BurySt.Edm
Friday

Cov,& War.
Saturday 16
Shrewsbury

Newc. &To
Mlouday 18 Croydon

Norw.& Cit.

Bodmin Wedseld 20

Stafford Friday 22

Carlisle Saturday 23

Bridgewati Wedneid.27

Appleby
Thursday 28

Priftol
Saturday 30

Lancaster

15 Lewes

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Entrance of the Temple Church.

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BEING THE FIRST NUMBER OF THE SECOND PART OF VOL. LIII.

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To Mr. URBAN, for THE LONDON ANTIQUARY. SIR,

its encouragement and continuance here, IME has been too and the time when it took its flight and invidious in its out left us. We are indebted to this peorages. Beauty, ple for much of our learning, upon the strength, and mag- dawn of its rettoration in there western nificence, have fal- parts of the world. For, upon relen proftrate under courfe had to their books, we found its frowns, and win many translations of ancient authors inthered into oblivion. to their Arabic, the originals of which

-The memorable were soon afterwards lost; and which pace of useful kno:vledge has been man. were translated into other languages, gled by the destructive fcythe of this from thei books. The Saracens formmerciless invader, and left to perished themselves into societies for the proamidst the common mass of clementary pagation of fcience; and the society,

Arts have died away, which called at this day. Free Mafons, was of feemed to claim immortality as their their institution. The church of the birth-right. Science has veiled her Sepulchre at Jerusalem being nearly their countenance, and withdrawn her influ- fiul progeny, as conceived by Science, ence, before she had attained her meri. was a model for structures in various dian fplendour. Historic monuments parts of the world. They drew the of inventive genius, events, incidents, whole force of their conceptions from structures, have stood forward, and in- the Tuscan of the Romans. This, howvited attention for a feason : but either ever, they varied : but the robust shaft through the violent inroads of hoitile they retained. The capital they ornadevallation, or want of case in the pre- mented with palm leaves, instead of the servation of some of these memonals, ucanthus, which indeed belongs tothe Co. they have submited to the intuits of rinthian, and adopted the circular arch. conquest or inattention; and have made This fpecies of building continued, and a dark chalin in the various conveyances made an extensive stride,' both before of knowledge. Where are the writings and after that pious jacerdotal stratagem, which have been particularly devoted to revel into power, cale, and security, to enquiries into the rise and progress upon the rapine and daughter of manof the Saracenic architecture The kind, commonly called the Holy War. same answer will be equally applicable, That species of architecture called Go. when we search for the writings of the thic is no more than the second manner firft Roman historiane. Where are the of the Saracenic. There were no artists, works of Fabius Pictor, L. Cincius, L. no persons of science, in those carly Pifo Frugi? They have all perished in times, except 'he Saracens, for the for the wreck of time.

mation of designs for structures. They The Saracens were a learned people. Were caruefly folicized by princes, and They certainly publifhed accounts of persons versed in other branches of litetheir first essays in architecture. Others rature; 10,4815t their abilities in archie have done the same, and made observa. ieftical knowiedge, where large jacred tions upon its introduction into Europe, kructures were much defired: of which

abilities

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abilities they have given no inconfider “ To alle Christen peopl this present able documents in Europe, Afa, and “ writyng endented, seeng, redyng, or Africa Through too great a contempt, “ heryng, lobn Wulricb maistr mason of cherished by them, towards other reli “ the werks of the Kynges College Roial gious persuasions, they introduced into of our Lady and Seynt Nicholas of facred buildings, entrusted to their skill “ Cambrigge, lobn Bell mason, wardeyn and management, that vernacular ima “ in the same werks, &c. Written at gery, so disgraceful to some of our “ Camb. 17 Aug. 1476. 16 Edw. IV." Christian churches, where they or their Most of these persons, for a great disciples have been employed, consisting length of time, were foreigners; and in of ludicrous heads and wanton figures. the first institution by the Saracens, all

The most ancient structure of this were fo. In process of time, as soon as character in England was the chapel of the people of this island became acthe Infrmary, or St. Catberine ; which quainted with the principles of design, was built in the time of the Confeffor the artificers, as well as the art, were Edward. This fabrick stood till the domestic : but this did not happen till year 1571: at which time it was almost about the reign of Henry VIll. For wholly pulled down. It had been re- foon after Henry the VIlth's reign, we builded about the year 1300; but the were obliged to call-in the assistance of arches and pillars, as they had not suf- foreign artists, for the design and exefered by the depredations of time, were cution of his tomb; and it is probable continued upon the new erection. At that his chapel was ereated by persons this day are to be seen an arch and an of the same description. half, with the Saracenie column. There The structure of the Temple church remains, venerable indeed as they are, is Saracenic. The circular part was are in the present yard of the house be- built first, and food a century or two, Jonging to John Mcrest, Esq. in the little before that addition was made to it Cloisters of Wefiminjier Abbey. They, where service is now performed. The at this time, confiitute part of the wall. addition is a second manner of this arwhich incloses the yard: and the inter-'chitecture. All the old churches here fices of the columns and half-arch, as were circular buildings; and indeed all weil as of the entire arch, are filled up the first churches here were so; copied, with buick-work. See Widmore's Hit- as foine suppose, from the circular church tory of this Church, p. 141. Widmore of the Sepulchre at Jerusalem. . But the calls these remains the door-way' of the conception of the figure arose from the chapel; but, upon a cool and deliberate consideration of the lymbolical doctrine inspection, they will be found to be a conveyed to the mind by the circle; the part of the old arcade; and that the eternity of the Deity, without beginground has been considerably raised in ning, and without end. Thus the oper this part with the rubbish of the old temples of the Druids were circular, or structure.

of an elliptical figure, nearly approachWhen the mystery of masonry began ing to it. Such are they which appear to be more diffúrud, and theic fratcrni on Salisbury Piain, Abury, and near Long ties were established in different parts Compton, called Roll-Rich Stones. of Europe, they introduced the art of This church was confecrated by Hera. building with fone into England, about lives, patriarch of Jerufales, anno 1185 the middle of the 7th century. They in the reign of Henry II. This circumerected the chapel of King's College, fiance was legible in Saxor characters, This appears from the second and third over the portal near the cloisters; which Indenlure, to be seen in the archives of characters were visibic in the year 1605, that collegiate body, made between the and perhaps continued fetill ihe repairs provost of the college, the scholars, and of inc front, near the cloisters, when a . the matter-mason, Jobn Hastell.

new entrance was erected, which has It appears from the mysterious rium- greatly disguited the inteligent admirers bers, 3, 7, 5, which are the different of architectuie: for as it was intended numbers of the steps at cach entrance of for a Doric entrance, in its being united the chapel, numbers well understood by to a Saracenic dehgn, it is an absolute modern malons. It appears froro au falje concord in fructure, and much like intrument in writing, preserved in the the licence of a painter, who, when the Arcbives of Caius College, and fome head of an old patriarch is nearly detime since transmitted to me by a fellow faced upon the canvas, supplies it with of that society. It runs thus :

a young
siniling countenance, upon the

remains

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