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THE

EUROPEAN MAGAZINE,

AND

LONDON REVIEW,

; For DECEMBER 1791.

MR. CHARLES MACKLIN.

[WITH A PORTRAIT.].

As when that Hero, who in each campaign
Had brav'd the Goth, and many a Vandal flain,
Lay fortune-ftruck, a fpectacle of woe!
Wept by each friend, forgiv'n by every foe;
Was there a generous, a reflecting mind
But pitied BELISARIUS old and blind?
Was there a Chief but melted at the fight?
A common Soldier who but clubb'd his mite?
Such, fuch emotions should in Britons rife,

When prefs'd by want and weaknefs MACKLIN lies. POPE on Dennis.

AT the age of ninety-two, Mr. Macklin, the Neftor of the Stage, after an exertion of his talents for the maintenance of himself and his family unto a period much later than falls to the general lot of mankind, by the lofs of his memory has found himfelf reduced to a fituation which has compelled him to folicit the attention of the public towards him. When it is confidered, that the prefent state of his affairs is not owing to extravagance or vicious indulgencies, but to caufes from which no human being can exempt himself, it is apprehended few words will be neceffary to induce the public to regard the application for him with a favourable eye. We fhall, therefore, lay before our readers Mr. Murphy's Addrefs fubjoined to the Propofal for printing the Man of the World, and Love A-lamode; intending at a future, and not diftant period, to give a full account of Mr. Macklin's Life and Writings.

TO THE PUBLIC.

WHEN the reafons which have occafoned the neceffity of the prefent plan are

fhortly stated, the friends of Mr. Macklin are willing to perfuade themselves, that propofals for a fubfcription will not be unwelcome to the public. Dr. Johnson obferved, on a fimilar occafion, that " To afift induftrious indigence, Struggling with diffress, and debilitated by age, is a difplay of virtue, and an acquifition of happiness and honour."

The prefent Addrefs is an appeal to the humanity and generofity of a large and opulent community, in behalf of a man who has lived to the age of ninety-two, and of that long life has paffed near seventy years under the eye of the public, at all times diligent in his bufinefs, and now a worn-out-veteran in the fervice of the Drama.

Bleffed with uncommon vigour of conftitution, Mr. Macklin hoped that his induftry and indefatigable pains would have held him above want to the end of his life. But the decay of his memory has deprived him of all hopes of appearing again in that profeffion which he always loved, and before that public whom he honoured for the generous encouragement with Fff 2

which

which his exertions have been always diftinguished.

It is now near three years fince he firft felt, in the middle of his part, on Covent Garden Stage, a fudden failure of memory. He has lived from that time in hopes of recovering his faculties; but his hopes have been too fanguine, and he now feels with regret, that he can never again have the honour of presenting himself before a British Audience.

It is for this reafon that his friends prefume to make this application. The two pieces on which the applaufe of numerous audiences has stamped a value were never printed; and as Mr. Macklin's memory has fo far deferted him as to render thofe productions of no further ufe to him, it has been agreed, at a meeting of his friends, to offer them to the public by fubfcription.

The Editor has moft cheerfully undertaken the office of fuperintending the prefs, for a difabled performer, whom he has known during a number of years, and whom he always refpected for his profeffional talents. He would take the liberty to add more, were he not restrained by Mr. Macklin, who fays,

"That he has not lived an inattentive obferver of the public mind, and therefore defires that his cafe, without further folicitation, may be left to the generofity of fuch as are willing to relieve the languor of age, and the pains of difeafe and indigence.

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TO DOCTOR BROCKLESBY.
DEAR SIR,

HAVING heard, laft night, that a plan had been adopted for the relief of Mr. Macklin, I have fent five guineas, which I defire you will apply as my fubfcription. Independent of the pleasure I have received from the writings and action of that celebrated comedian, Mr. Macklin has a peculiar claim on me from the following circumstance:

On the death of Hèfiod Cooke, about the end of the year 1756, at South Lambeth, myfel and another gentleman fet on foot a private fubfcription for burying him, and for the relief of his wife and only daughter. Whilft he yet lay dead in the houfe, I related to a friend at the Bedford Coffee-houfe an account of his death, and the diftrets of his family, in the hearing of Mr. Macklin, then standing near the bar; immediately after which, though I had never fpoken to him before, nor have at any time fince, Mr. Macklin addreffed me in words to the following pur

port:"I am much concerned, Sir, at hearing the melancholy account you have given of poor Cooke and his family; I had a respect for him whilft living, and you will therefore oblige me very much, if you will permit me to add my mite to the fubfcription you have fo laudably fet on foot; and he gave me two guineas.

Such an unexpected act of genuine benevolence has ever fince impreffed my mind with a most favourable opinion of the goodness of Mr. Macklin's heart, and I have fearce ever heard his name mentioned in private companies without telling it to his honour.

If you fhould think the publication of this anecdote, at this time, would be ufeful to Mr. Macklin, you have my leave to make it known in any manner you fhall choose.

Great

I am, Dear Sir,
with much Refpect,

Your faithful humble Servant,
JOSEPH MAWBEY.

George-Street, Weftminster,
Nov. 25, 1791.

A lift of the feveral Characters performed by Mr. Macklin in London, from the year 1734.

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This Play was revived the 14th of February in this year.

Twelfth Night

Merchant of Venice

Macahon

As the caft of the characters

may, at this time, be an object of curiofity, we shall here infert it. The 19th night of its performance was for Mr. Macklin's benefit.

Antonio

Baffanio

Gratiano

Shylock

Launcelot

Gobbo

Salanio

Morochius

Mr. Quin
Mr. Milward

Mr. Mills

Mr. Macklin

Mr. Chapman

Mr. Johnfon

Mr. Berry

Mr. Cafhell

Lorenzo

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favour in doing it without any folicitation; and I fhall look on myself as the perfon obliged, if you will be to kind as to accept of my volume of original pieces, and fome fmaller things of mine, one of which is a play, which was acted this winter at Drury-lane Playhoufe *. I will foon do myself the honour to wait on you,, to encourage you to vifit my fmall but pleafant habitation. I have fent to Mr. Annesley by the fame messenger, making a request to him, the compliance with which, I believe, will not be to his dishonour or difintereft; and my extraordinary regard to his peculiar fate makes me defirous of his compliance with my request. I am, Sir, Your obliged,

and most obedient Servant, THOMAS COOKE.

South Lambeth, March 24, 1744.

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After returning you and Mr. Mackercher thanks for the favour of your fubfcriptions to my Plautus, I beg leave to fubmit a request to you, which nothing but my very fincere wishes for your future fuccefs and felicity fhould induce me to make. Having prepared the ten volumes of my edition and tranflation of Plautus's Comedies, I am determined to pay a pub. lic mark of refpect to ten perions, with very difinterested views; by addressing a volume to each of them, and without the ufual aims of addreffes of that fort, being refolved to admit of no return, in whatever manner offered. All that I intreat is, that thofe perfons will be so good, as promoters of the work, towards embellifhing it, to favour me with their contributions for a fet of copper-plates for each refpective volume, for which I have agreed with an eminent engraver for five guineas a fet. What I propofe by this method

is, to defray the expences of my copperplates, and at the fame time to indulge the pleasure, which will be a great one to me, of paying a peculiar tribute of regard to ten perfons who I think deferve those tributes. Eight perfons (among whom are the Earls of Chesterfield and Godolphin, and Admiral Vernon) have been fo kind, on the first application, as to favour me with their contributions for a fet of copper-plates each; and I affure you, that it will give me a fingular pleasure, to raife a monument of my regard to you, before a volume of an edition and translation of one of the finest ancient authors, and for the reafons which I have given in my addrefs to you, which I have enclosed that you may fee what I propofe to print; and I make this requeft to you with the lefs referve, as I fcorn the expectation of any future advantage from it; and I affure you, that I fhould with great pleafure do any offices of regard to you in my power. I beg your acceptance of a Prologue and Epilogue of mine on Shakespeare and his writings, which were spoke laft winter †, and of a Play of mine which was acted laft December. I have enclosed my preface to my Plautus, that you may fee at what a vaft expence of time, trouble, and charge I have been in this work; and I beg the return of the preface because it is part of a fet on ordinary paper. When bufinefs will permit, and the days fhall be tempting, I fhould be proud to fee you and Mr. Mackercher here. I have encióted a receipt to you for a set of copper-piates; and the favour of your contribution by my fervant, fhall meet with fuch returns as I believe will not be difagreeable to you, from Sir,

Your obliged,

and noft humble,

and most obedient Servant, THOMAS COOKE.

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It was called "Love the Cause and Cure of Grief." A Tragedy acted the 19th of December 1743. It was performed only once. EDITOR.

+ Published in folio; they were (poken by Mr. Garrick and Mrs, Woffington, before and after the Merchant of Venice, acted at Drury-lane 21ft January 1743, for Mr. Cooke's benefit, EDITOR.

ANE C.

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