The Gentleman's Magazine, 58. kötet,2. rész

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E. Cave, jun. at St John's Gate, 1788
The "Gentleman's magazine" section is a digest of selections from the weekly press; the "(Trader's) monthly intelligencer" section consists of news (foreign and domestic), vital statistics, a register of the month's new publications, and a calendar of forthcoming trade fairs.

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946. oldal - ... 7. That the subjects which are Protestants may have arms for their defence suitable to their conditions and as allowed by law. 8. That election of members of parliament ought to be free. 9. That the freedom of speech and debates or proceedings in parliament ought not to be impeached or questioned in any court or place out of parliament.
946. oldal - That levying money for or to the use of the crown, by pretence of prerogative, without grant of parliament, for longer time or in other manner than the same is or shall be granted, is illegal. 5. That it is the right of the subjects to petition the king, and all commitments and prosecutions for such petitioning are illegal.
691. oldal - No Traveller returns) puzzles the Will ; And makes us rather bear thofe Ills we have, Than fly to others that we know not of. Thus...
995. oldal - If then the corner of a bit of blotting paper be carefully and dexterously applied near the letters...
955. oldal - ... nothing less can justify subscription to the Thirty-nine Articles, than the actual belief of each and every separate proposition contained in them, must suppose, that the legislature expected the consent of ten thousand men, and that in perpetual succession, not to one controverted proposition, but to many hundreds. It is difficult to conceive how this could be expected by any, who ' observed the incurable diversity of human opinion upon all subjects short of demonstration.
955. oldal - They who contend, that nothing less can justify subscription to the Thirty-nine Articles, than the actual belief of each and every separate proposition contained in them, must suppose, that the legislature expected the consent of ten thousand men, and that in perpetual succession, not to one controverted proposition, but to many hundreds. It is difficult to conceive how...
916. oldal - Though hard and rare : thee I revifit fafe, And feel thy fovran vital lamp ; but thou Revifit'ft Revifit'ft not thefe eyes, that roll in vain To find thy piercing ray, and find no dawn ; So thick a drop ferene hath quench'd their orbs, 25 Or dim fuffufion veil'd.
714. oldal - IN examining things present, we have data from which to reason with regard to what has been; and, from what has actually been, we have data for concluding with regard to that which is to happen hereafter. Therefore, upon the supposition that the operations of nature are equable and steady, we find, in natural appearances, means for concluding a certain portion of time to have necessarily elapsed, in the production of those events of which we see the effects.
946. oldal - That the pretended power of dispensing with laws, or the execution of laws, by regal authority, as it hath been assumed and exercised of late, is illegal.
630. oldal - ABBA THULE, wearied out by that expectation, which so many returning moons, since his reckoning ceased, have by this time taught him he had nourished in vain. But the reader will bring him back to his remembrance, as armed with that unshaken fortitude that was equal to the trials of varying life. He will not in him, as in less manly spirits, see the passions rushing into opposite extremes — Hope turned to Despair — Affeftion converted to Hatred.

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