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4. What a blunder you and I have made ! (1) This is a simple exclamatory sentence. (2) You and I is the complete and the grammatical subject, and have made What a blunder is the complete predicate. (3) The grammatical predicate is the verb phrase have made. (4) The direct object is blunder. (5) Blunder is modified by the adjectives What and a.

EXERCISE

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Analyze the following simple sentences :

1. The house stood on the side of a hill. 2. Evangeline's heart was filled with gladness. 3. They tore the flag from its staff. 4. Where did you find this beautiful flower? 5. What reason can you assign for your conduct? 6. In 1620 the Pilgrims landed at Plymouth. 7. Pronounce every word distinctly. 8. What bloody deeds have been done in the name of religion! 9. I shall never see his dear face again. 10. Then sounded the tread of marching feet. II. Across its antique portico

Tall poplar trees their shadows throw. 12. Franklin's life was curiously divided between duties abroad and duties at home.

Analysis of Compound Sentences.
To analyze a compound sentence, it is necessary :

1. To tell the kind of sentence.
2. To name the clauses and the connective.
3. To analyze each clause.

The following sentences will serve as models for the analysis of the compound sentence:

1. He smote the rock of the national resources, and abundant streams of revenue gushed forth.

(1) This is a compound declarative sentence. (2) The first clause is He smote the rock of the national resources; the second clause is abundant streams of revenue gushed forth; the coördinate conjunction joining the two coördinate clauses is and.

(3) Analysis of the clauses :

FIRST CLAUSE: He is the complete and the grammatical subject, and smote the rock of the national resources is the complete predicate. The grammatical predicate is smote. The direct object is rock. Rock is modified by the adjective the and the adjective phrase of the national resources. Resources is modified by the adjectives the and national.

SECOND CLAUSE: Abundant streams of revenue is the complete subject, and gushed forth is the complete predicate. The grammatical subject is streams, and the grammatical predicate is gushed. Streams is modified by the adjective abundant and the adjective phrase of revenue. Gushed is modified by the adverb forth.

2. We must all hang together, or assuredly we shall all hang separately.

(1) This is a compound declarative sentence. (2) The first clause is We must all hang together; the second clause is assuredly we shall all hang separately; · the coördinate conjunction joining the two coördinate clauses is or.

(3) Analysis of the clauses :

FIRST CLAUSE: We all is the complete subject, and must hang together is the complete predicate. The grammatical subject is We, and the grammatical predicate is the verb phrase must hang. We is modified by the adjective all. Must hang is modified by the adverb together.

SECOND CLAUSE: We all is the complete subject, and assuredly shall hang separately is the complete predicate. The grammatical subject is we, and the grammatical predicate is the verb phrase shall hang. We is modified by the adjective all. Shall hang is modified by the adverbs assuredly and separately.

EXERCISE

Analyze the following compound sentences : 1. He touched the dead corpse of Public Credit, and it sprung

upon its feet.

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2. I was seeking you and you were seeking me.

3. The men fired three shots at the elephant, but he escaped into the forest.

4. You must return these books promptly, or you will be fined by the librarian.

5. The heavens declare the glory of God, and the firmament sheweth his handiwork. 6. The world goes up and the world goes down,

And the sunshine follows the rain. 7. I have never seen the monument, but you have visited it often.

8. I shall meet him in Atlanta, or he will meet me in New Orleans.

Analysis of Complex Sentences.
To analyze a complex sentence, it is necessary :

1. To tell the kind of sentence.
2. To name the clauses and the connective.
3. To analyze each clause.

The following sentences will serve as models for the analysis of the complex sentence:

1. When summer returns, the flowers will bloom again. (1) This is a complex declarative sentence. (2) The dependent clause is When summer returns; the independent clause is the flowers will bloom again; the subordinate conjunction joining the dependent clause to the independent clause is When.

(3) Analysis of the clauses :

DEPENDENT CLAUSE: Summer is the complete and the grammatical subject, and returns is the complete and the grammatical predicate.

INDEPENDENT CLAUSE: The flowers is the complete subject, and will bloom again is the complete predicate. The grammatical subject is flowers, and the grammatical predicate is the verb phrase will bloom. Flowers is modified by

. the adjective the. Will bloom is modified by the adverb again.

2. If we do well here, we shall do well there.

(1) This is a complex declarative sentence. (2) The dependent clause is If we do well here; the independent clause is we shall do well there; the subordinate conjunction joining the dependent clause to the independent clause is If.

(3) Analysis of the clauses :

DEPENDENT CLAUSE: We is the complete and the grammatical subject, and do well here is the complete predicate. The grammatical predicate is do. Do is modified by the adverbs well and here.

INDEPENDENT CLAUSE: We is the complete and the grammatical subject, and shall do well there is the complete predicate. The grammatical predicate is the verb phrase shall do. Shall do is modified by the adverbs well and there.

EXERCISE

Analyze the following complex sentences : 1. He smiled when he saw me. 2. Nathan failed at school because he did not study. 3. Although he had been convicted, he did not confess his crime. 4. Whenever he spoke to his sons, they obeyed promptly. 5. He said that he had entirely forgotten it. 6. If you see my friends in New York, write to me about them. 7. While we were hunting for rabbits, we started up a fox.

8. George Washington gained several victories where he least expected them.

Parsing.

1. To parse a noun, we name (1) its class, (2) its gender, (3) its number, and (4) its case, giving a reason for the case.

2. To parse a pronoun, we name (1) its class, (2) its number, and (3) its case, giving a reason for the case.

3. To parse a verb or verb phrase used as a predicate, we name (1) its class, (2) its principal parts, (3) its number, (4) its tense, (5) its mood, and (6) its voice.

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