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HINTS FOR THE HOUSEHOLD. Scarlet Fever.- This disease is so common and so terrible that a few words in regard to it seem appropriate here. People do not appear to realize that it is nearly as infectious and often as dangerous as small-pox, and that they ought to make it a point of conscience to exercise the greatest care to avoid spreading it. It may be communicated hy clothing, blankets, sofas, beds, and other articles of furniture, as well as by presence in the house where the sick person is. Cases are known in which women who had visited scarletfever patients have carried the disease to other houses, weeks afterwards, in their clothing: A mother may carry home sickness and death to her own children, by visiting the sickroom, or attending the funeral of a friend's child. Fear of contagion should not withhold any one from giving necessary assistance, but many risks are incurred without the least necessity. Books and magazines should not be used in the sickroom, or carried into it, especially public-library books. It is dangerous to allow a cat or dog to be fondled by a sick child, as the disease may be carried in the fur.

The greatest care should be taken to keep the patient entirely separate from the rest of the family. Disinfectants should be used during the disease, and afterwards everything about the premises which has been in any way connected with the patient should be thoroughly disinfected under the direction of a physician.

A child who has had the fever, no matter how lightly, should not be allowed to mingle with other children, especially at school, for fully a month from the disappearance of the rash; and not then if the skin is still peeling off. He should be kept apart from other children until the new skin has formed and no more particles come away, because they carry contagion. Light cases of this fever require watchful care, as serious and even fatal results sometimes ensue from a cold taken when the skin is susceptible, when the child has had so slight an attack at first that it seemed a trifling affair. In all cases, whether light or severe, get the best medical advice you can procure.

The Diet of Children. It is very important that children should be fed on wholesome, nourishing food, at proper intervals. A child who is allowed to eat fried food, saleratus bread, pastry, cake, &c., and to drink tea and coffee, is very unlikely to possess a healthy stomach when fully grown, and may become a wretched invalid, even if life is not materially shortened by these errors. The only drinks fit for a child are milk, of which it should have an abundance, and water; or occasionally milk and warm water slightly sweetened; but this last is not so nourishing, of course, as pure milk. Milk is a most valuable article of diet through childhood, and indeed it is often very desirable food for grown people. It supplies material for the growing bones and teeth. Bread made of fine white flour is not suitable for children, if it is for anybody. It is constipating, and does not contain some of the most important portions of the wheat. A palatable and much more wholesome kind of bread may be made by mixing the white flour with Graḥam meal or flour in the proportions of two parts of white to one of Graham. It is lighter than Graham alone, and can take the place of white bread entirelyIt should be raised with yeast and never eaten less than twenty-four hours old. Graham gems made with milk or with water, without any other ingredients, beaten up briskly, and baked in a quick oven, in iron gem-pans, are very wholesome. Oatmeal is one of the best articles of food known for growing children. The custom, so long in use in England, is yearly becoming more general here, of giving children a daily portion of oatmeal for breakfast. It helps to keep the bowels in good order, and in combination with milk serves to make good bones and teeth. Many a tooth-ache and dentist's bill in later life might be avoided by giving children a diet from infancy which would provide them with strong, firm teeth. With all possible pains, bad teeth or delicate digestion may be inherited which cannot be made first-rate, but such cases need at least all the care which can be given.

Stewed fruit, ripe, sound fruit, fresh, well-cooked vegetables, meat roasted or boiled without having the juices dried up, should be added to the bill of fare. Puddings should be simple and well cooked.

Children should be trained to eat all that they require at the regular meals, and should not be allowed to cat at irregular intervals between meals, especially of sweet articles. If they are not able to wait as long as older people, let them have a lunch of bread or ripe fruit at a regular time, ncarly midway between two meals.

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We take pleasure in announcing that we have recently published

The Franklin Written Arithmetic

, The Franklin Elementary Arithmetic,

WITH EXAMPLES FOR ORAL PRACTICE, and

BY EDWIN P. SEAVER, A. M.,
HEAD MASTER OF THE ENGLISH HIGH SCHOOL, BOSTON ; FORMERLY ASSISTANT

PROFESSOR OF MATHEMATICS IN HARVARD COLLEGE ;

AND GEO. A. WALTON, A. M., AUTHOR OF WALTON'S ARITHMETICS, ARITHMETICAL TABLES, ETC. THE FRANKLIN WRITTEN ARITHMETIC contains a full course of arithmetical instruction and drill for pupils in the Common Schools. The FRANKLIN ELEMENTARY ARITHMETIC, though designed to be an introduction to the Franklin Written Arithmetic, is, nevertheless, a complete Arithmetic of its kind. It contains a short course in the clements of numbers, with such applications as are necessary in ordinary business transactions. These books are

full of well-chosen illustrative examples and practical problems, and they con-
tain fewer pages than any other arithmetics that are in any sense complete
now before the public. Topics of a merely theoretical interest, antiquated or
curious matter, and puzzling problems, are omitted altogether. The METRIC
SYSTEM has been treated in a way to indicate the most practical course to pur-
sue in teaching it. A special feature of these books is the DRILL EXERCISES,
which give a large number of miscellaneous examples on all topics treated in
the Arithmetics, -- sparing the teacher the trouble of selecting from other
books examples for class-crill.

We would also calloattention to SEAVER AND WALTON'S
Metric System of Weights, and Measures,

A pamphlet of twenty-four pages, - “the system in a nut-shell.”

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We have also just published

WORCESTER'S
New Primary and New Pronouncing

SPELLING-BOOKS.

The following are some of the distinguishing features of these books :-

1. The lessons are short and carefully graded.
. 2. The words liave been judiciously grouped in classes for phonic drill.

3. The lessons are variel in kind.
4. Review lessons are introduced at convenient intervals,

5. The Primary Spelling-Book is beautifully illustrated. Only common words are found in tlic lessons. Short sentences in script are given to be copied.

We would also call especial attention to

Adams's Spelling-Book for Advanced Classes

,

BY WILLIAM T. ADAMS,
FORMERLY PRINCIPAL OF THE BOWDITCH SCHCOL., BOSTON.

K7 Liberal terms for introduction and exchange. Address the Publishers,
WILLIAM WARE & CO.

(SUCCESSORS TO BREWER & TILESTON,)
47 Franklin Street,

Boston.

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Foreign & Domestic Stationery

, Letter-Copying and Seal Presses, Nautical Books,

,

COMMERCIAL BLANKS,

&c. &c.

No:130 stato.street,

(Opposite Broad street, i

BOSTON.

conexipon
ACCOUNT BOOKS,
of any pattern desired, made to order:
PRINTING, RULING, AND BINDING,

BINDING,
at low prices:

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: LCULATED ON A NEW AND IMPROVED PLAN,

FOR THE YEAR OF OUR LORD

1880;

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eing BISSEXTILE or LEAP YEAR, and (until July 4) 104th of American

Independence.
FITTED FOR BOSTON, BUT WILL ANSWER FOR ALL THE NEW ENGLAND STATES.
ontaining, besides the large number of Astronomical Calculations
and the Farmer's Calendar for every month in

the year, a variety of
NEW, USEFUL, AND ENTERTAINING MATTER.

ESTABLISHED IN 1793,
BY ROBERT B. THOMAS.

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Lament who will, in fruitless tears,

The speed with which our moments fly;
I sigh not over vanished years,
But watch the years that isasten by.

BRYANT.

BOSTON:
LISHED BY WILLIAM WARE & CO.
d by the Booksellers and Traders throughnut New England.
'ording to Act of Congress, in the year 1879, hy WILLIAM WARE,

in the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.)
2280%20
DODX00.00

” in money

TO PATRONS AND CORRESPONDENTS. We have again the pleasure of presenting to you the Old Almanack for a new year. During the past year we have got back to “hard pan matters, and times have improved. Let us stick to honest money, which is fairest and best every way.

The tables of courts, post-office regulations, etc., are examined with care, and will be found in their usual places, and some other tables of interest have also been inserted. Our friends will oblige us by notifying of any changes or errors.

With thanks for your continued favor, we close in the words of the founder of this Almanack:

“ It is by our works, and not by our words, we would be judged: these, we hope, will sustain us in

the humble though proud station we have so long held...:

Oooohhon

nomas."

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