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APPENDIX.

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NOTE A. See It is possible that the “resentment” spoken of in the third stanza was intended to indicate the anger of the Romans against the Druids.

The meaning then would be—we are silent because the Romans have cruelly imposed silence upon us. We learn from Tacitus [Annales xiv, 30.] that the Druids had just before, by their imprecations and threats, caused a temporary panic in the Roman army, and that, in consequence their groves had been cut down, and a garrison placed over them. This fact gives some colour to the interpretation here hazarded; and which has been suggested by a literary friend of the editor.

Note B.

See page 5. To avoid the tautology in the commencement of this poem, some unknown author has thus altered, with doubtful advantage, the original reading :

The lofty pillars of the sky
And spacious concave raised on high

Spangled with stars, &c.
Also-

The unwearied sun, from day to day,
Pours knowledge in his golden ray.

Note C. See

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7. The opinion that exact knowledge increases, rather than diminishes the pleasure of imagination, is thus expressed by Akenside :

Nor ever yet
The melting rainbow's vernal tinctured hues
To me have shone so pleasing, as when first
The hand of science pointed out the path
In which the sun-beams, gleaming from the west,
Fall on the watery cloud, whose darksome veil
Involves the orient.

Note D. See page 8. The expression “the world's grey fathers” seem to have been borrowed from an old poem by Henry Vaughan, a writer of the 17th century, who thus addresses the rainbow:

How bright wert thou when Shem's admiring eye
Thy burnished flaming arch did first descry;
When Zerah, Nahor, Haran, Abram, Lot,
The youthful world's grey fathers, in one knot,
Did with intentive looks watch every hour
For thy new light, and trembled at each shower!

Also by the same Editor, Price 3s. SELECT POETRY FOR CHILDREN!

WITH BRIEF EXPLANATORY NOTES,

THIRD EDITION, CORRECTED AND ENLARGED.

Extracts from Critical Notices. A very nice little volume, containing a charming collection of poetry.

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A judicious selection of attractive poems, suited to children between six and twelve, comprising subjects in which they can sympathize.

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