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individual pursuits—Friends in Council—Serious and gay books

—English humour—Southey's ballad—Necessity of intellectual

discipline—Disadvantage of courses of reading—Books not

insulated things—Authors who guide—Southey's Doctor—Elia

—Coleridge—Divisions of Prose and Poetry—Henry Taylor's

Notes from Books—Poetry not a mere luxury of the mind—

Arnold's habits of study and taste—The practical and poetical

element of Anglo-Saxon character—The Bible—Mosaic Poetry

—Inadequacy of language—Lockhart's character of Scott—Ar-

nold's character of Scipio—Tragic poetry—Poetry for children

—Robinson Crusoe and the Arabian Nights—Wordsworth's Ode

to Duty—Character of Washington Page 54

LECTURE III.

THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE.

Medium of ideas often forgotten—Witchery of English words-

Analysis of good style difficult—The power of words—Our duty

to the English language—Lord Bacon's idea of Latin—Milton—

Hume's expostulation with Gibbon—Daniel's Lament—Exten-

sion of English language—French dominion in America—Lan-

dor's Penn and Peterborough—Duty of protecting and guarding

language—Degeneracy of language and morals—Age of Charles

II.—Language part of character—Arnold's Lectures on Modern

History—Use of disproportionate words—Origin of the English

language in the North—Classical and romantic languages—

Saxon element of our language—Its superiority—The Bible

idiom—Structure of sentences—Prepositions at the end of most

vigorous sentences—Composite sentences, and the Latin element

—Alliteration—Grandeur of sentences in old writers—Modern

short sentences—Junius—Macaulay—No peculiar poetic diction

—Doctor Franklin's rules—Shakspeare's matchless words—

Wordsworth's sonnet—Byron—Landor—Coleridge's Christabel

—"The Song in the Mind "—Hood—The Bridge of Sighs 85

LECTURE IV.

EARLY ENGLISH LITERATURE.

Early English prose and poetry—Sir John Mandeville—Sir Tho-

mas More's Life of Edward the Fifth—Chaucer's Tales—At-

fcempted paraphrases—Chaucer Modernized—Conflict of Nor-

man and Saxon elements—Gower—Reign of Edward the Third—

Continental wars—Petrarch—Boccacio—Froissart—The church

—Wyclif—Arts and Architecture—Statutes in English—Chau-

cer resumed—His humour and pathos—Sense of natural beauty

—The Temple of Fame—Chaucer and Mr. Babbage—The flower

and the leaf—Canterbury Tales—Chaucer's high moral tone—■

Wordsworth's stanza—Poet's corner and Chaucer's tomb—The

death of a Language—English minstrelsy—Percy's Reliques

—Sir Walter Scott—Wilson—Christian hymns and chaunts—

Conversion of King Edwin—Martial ballads—Lockhart—

Spanish ballads—Ticknor's great work—Edom of Gordon—

Dramatic power of the ballad—The Two Brothers—Contrast of

early and late English poetry Page 121

LECTURE V.

LITERATURE OF THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY.

Dawn of letters a false illustration—Intellectual gloom from Ed-

ward III. to Henry VIII.—Chaucer to Spenser—Caxton and

the art of printing—Civil wars—Wyatt and Surrey—The son-

net naturalized in English poetry—Blank verse—Henry VIIL

—Edward VI.—Landor's Sonnet—Sternhold and Hopkins—

Bishop Latimer—Goodwin Sands and Tenterden Steeple—

"Bloody Mary "■—Sackville—"The Mirror of Magistrates"—

His career—Age of Elizabeth—Contrasts of her life—The

Church as an independent English power—Shakspeare—His

journey to London—Final formation of the English language

—"The well of English undefiled"—The Reformation—Sir

Philip Sydney—The Bishop's Bible—Richard Hooker—Spen-

ser and Shakspeare—Wilson's Criticism — Sir Walter Raleigh

—Shakspeare's Prose. 155

LECTURE VI.

LITERATURE OP THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY, WITH INCIDENTAL

SUGGESTIONS ON SUNDAY READING.

Hooker's Ecclesiastical Polity—Progress of English literature-

Sir Walter Raleigh's History of the World—Bacon's Essays—

Milton—Conras—Hymn on the Nativity—Suggestions as to

Sunday reading—Sacred books—Forms of Christian faith—

Evidences of Religion—Butler's Analogy—Charles Lamb's Re-

marks on Stackhouse—History of the Bible—Jeremy Taylor—

Holy Living and Dying—Life of Christ—Pulpit-oratory—Sou-

they's Book of the Church—Thomas Fuller—Wordsworth's

Ecclesiastical Sonnets—Izaak Walton's Lives—Pilgrim's Pro-

gress—The Old Man's Home—George Herbert—Henry Vaughan

—Milton resumed—Paradise Lost—Criticism on it as a purely

sacred poem—Shakspeare's mode of treating sacred subjects—

Spenser—The Faery Queen—John Wesley—Keble's Christian

Year—George Wither—Aubrey De Vere—Trench's Sonnet. Page 184

LECTURE VII.

LITERATURE OF THE SEVENTEENTH AND EIGHTEENTH CENTURIES.

Milton's old age—Donne's Sermons—No great school of poetry

without love of nature—Blank in this respect between Paradise

Lost and Thomson's Seasons—Court of Charles the Second-

Samson Agonistes—Milton's Sonnets—Clarendon's History of

the Rebellion—Pilgrim's Progress—Dryden's Odes—Absalom

and Achitophel—Rhyming tragedies—Age of Queen Anne-—

British Statesmen—Essayists—Tatler—Spectator—Sir Roger

De Coverley—Pope—Lord Bolingbroke—English Infidels-

Johnson's Dictionary—Gray—Collins—Cowper—Goldsmith—

The Vicar of Wakefield—Cowper—Elizabeth Browning 215

LECTURE VIIL

LITERATURE OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY.

Literature of our own times—Influence of political and social re-

lations—The historic relations of literature—The French Revo-

lution, and its effects—Infidelity—Thirty years' Peace—Scien-

tific progress coincident with letters—History—Its altered tone

—Arnold—Prescott—Niebuhr—Gibbon—Hume—Robertson—

Religious element in historical style—Lord Mahon—Macaulay's

History—Historical romance—Waverley Novels—The pulpit—

Sydney Smith—Manning—Poetry of the early part of the cen-

tury—Bowles and Rogers—Campbell—Coleridge's Christabel—

Lay of the Last Minstrel—Scott's poetry 248

LECTURE IX.

CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE.

Lord Byron—His popularity and its decline—His power of sim-

ple, vigorous language—Childe Harold—The Dying Gladiator

—The Isles of Greece—Contrast of Byron's and Shakspeare's

creations—Miss Barrett—Miss Kemble's sonnet—Byron as a

poet of nature—His antagonism to Divine truth—The Dream,

the most faultless of his poems—Don Juan—Shelley—Leigh

Hunt's remarks on—Carlyle—His earnestness — Southey—

His historical works—Thalaba—Wordsworth—His character-

istics—Eemale authors—Joanna Baillie—Miss Edgeworth—

Mrs. Kemble—Mrs. Norton—Miss Barrett—Cry of the Chil-

dren, &g ....Page 212

LECTURE X.

TRAGIC AND ELEGIAC POETRY.

Contrast of subjects, serious and gay—Tragic poetry—Illustrated in

history—Death of the first-born—Clarendon's raising the stand-

ard at Nottingham—Moral use of tragic poetry—Allston's cri-

ticism—Elegiac poetry—Its power not mere sentimentalism—

Gray's Elegy, an universal poem—Philip Van Artevelde—Caro-

line Bowles—" Pauper's Death Bed"—Wordsworth's Elegies—

Milton's Lycidas—Adonais—In Memoriam—Shelley's Poem on

Death of Keats—Tennyson—In Memoriam reviewed 309

LECTURE XL

LITERATURE OP WIT AND HUMOUR.

Subtilty of these emotions—Sydney Smith and Leigh Hunt—

Dullness of jest-books—Hudibras a tedious book—Sydney

Smith's idea of the study of wit—Charles Lamb—Incapacity

for a jest—German note on Knickerbocker—Stoicism and Pu-

ritanism—Guesses at Truth—Cheerful literature needed for

thoughtful minds—Recreative power of books—Different modes

of mental relaxation—Napoleon—Shelley—Cowper—Southey's

merriness—Doctor Arnold—Shakspeare and Scott's humour—

The Antiquary—Burke—Barrow's definition of wit—Hobbes—-

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