The Military Life of John, Duke of Marlborough

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Harper & Brothers, 1855 - 410 oldal
Bogen er ikke alene en beskrivelse af alle de slag han førte, Marlboroughs liv fra fødsel til død beskrives detaljeret og understøttes af de citerede brevvekslinger.

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Parallel between his Treachery and that of Ney
33
Honors and Commands bestowed on Churchill He signs the Act of Association in favor of William
34
His first Services in foreign War under William
35
He is liberated from Prison and ere long restored to Favor
37
And appointed to the supreme Command in the Netherlands
38
At which Period the Blenheim Papers commenced
39
Vast Ability by which the Government of France was directed
40
Extraordinary Success which had hitherto attended Louis in all his Enterprises
41
Hopes and Schemes of the Catholic Party throughout Eu rope at this Time Their ultimate Failure
42
Simultaneous Attacks on the Protestants in France and En gland irrevocably separate the two Countries
43
Efforts of William III to avert the Danger
44
Manner in which the Bequest of Spain to the Duke of Anjou had been obtained
45
ers from this Accession to the Power of France
47
Comparative Strength of the Forces on the opposite Sides
49
CHAPTER II
50
Which arose from the Greatness of his Deeds
51
Vast Changes which he effected on France during his Reign
52
Which arose from his Turn of Mind coinciding with the Spirit of the Age
53
His Virtues and Vices were alike those of his People
54
His Government was essentially feudal and monarchical
55
His Efforts to give Unity to Thought
56
Marlboroughs brilliant March which defeats
57
General Resemblance of his Ideas of Government to those of Napoleon
58
Magnificent Ideas of each as shown in their public Works
59
Which produced the Reaction against him that checked his Power
60
Opposite Characters of Louis XIV and William III
61
Heroic Resistance of William to the French Invasion
62
Adaptation of the Character of William to his Destiny in Life
63
His Policy in War which at length proved Victorious
64
His Character in Private
65
Character of James II of England
66
The Rashness and Imprudence which cost him his Throne
67
Commencement of the War
68
Forces on the side of France
69
Marlboroughs first Mission to the Continent and first Cam paign
71
Bonn 2
73
The Dutch prevent Marlborough from Fighting and the Cam paign concludes with the taking of Limbourg
74
Disasters on the Upper Rhine and in Bavaria
75
Extreme Danger of the Empire from these Successes
76
French Plan of the Campaign in Germany
77
Plan of the Allies to counteract it
78
Marlboroughs cross March into Germany
79
Sabsequent Successes in Bavaria
80
Marshal Tallard joins the Elector of Bavaria who determines to fight
81
Vendôme is defeated in his Attempt to penetrate through the Tyrol
82
Forces on both sides and their comparative Merits
83
French Position and Dispositions with its Dangers
85
And Advantages
86
Commencement of the Battle
87
Attack on Blenheim which is repulsed
88
Crossing of the Nebel by the Allies
89
The Cavalry with great Difficulty are got across
90
Rout of Prince Holstein in the Attack on Oberglau
91
Operations of Eugene on the Right
92
Grand and decisive Charge by Marlborough in the Center
93
Eugenes Success on the Right
94
Total Rout of Tallard who is made Prisoner
95
Mistake by which the French Left escaped Destruction
96
Capture of all the Troops in Blenheim and Conclusion of the Battle
97
Results of the Battle
98
Causes of the Defeat of the French
99
Capture of Landau and Traerbach and Conclusion of the Campaign
101
Honors and Rewards bestowed on Marlborough
102
Bitter Sense which Marlborough entertained of this parsimo
105
Vigorous Efforts of the French Government
112
His able Plan to overreach the Enemy
118
Marlborough prepares to attack the French at Waterloo
124
of 1706
132
Forces on the opposite Sides in Flanders
133
Position of the French at Ramillies
134
Marlboroughs Maneuvers before the Battle and Plan of Attack
135
Commencement of the Battle and skillful Feint of Marl borough
136
Repulse of Overkirk and imminent Danger of Marlborough when hastening to his Relief
137
Villerois Efforts to restore the Battle which are unsuccessful
139
General Advance of the Allies which completes the Victory
140
Losses of the French and the Allies in the Battle
141
And its great Results
142
Retreat of the French from Flanders and universal Joy at its Liberation
143
Capitulation of Ghent Bruges Antwerp and Oudenarde
144
Marlboroughs Hopes for a speedy Peace
145
Siege and Capture of Ostend
146
It is at length carried by Assault
147
Siege and Fall of Dendermonde
148
And of Ath which concludes the Campaign
149
Splendid Reception of Marlborough at Brussels and great Results of the Campaign
150
Splendid and disinterested Conduct of Marlborough in re fusing the Government of the Netherlands
151
Jealousies of the Dutch and continued Disinterestedness of Marlborough
153
Marlboroughs Address obtains a renewal of the Alliance
154
His Return to England and splendid Reception there
155
Great Error in the subsequent Policy of England
157
Vigorous Preparations made by Louis XIV for the Cam
179
0
184
Forces on both sides and Commencement of the Battle
189
Results of the Battle
195
Preparations of the Allies for the Siege
197
Siege of the Citadel of Lille and Diversion of Vendôme
203
Marlborough recovers Ghent
204
He turns Villarss Lines and gets between them and France
224
Noble Force on both sides
229
Plan of Attack by the Allied Generals
231
A vigorous Attack of Villars on the Right weakens his Center
237
Continued Decline of Marlboroughs Influence at Court
243
Battle of Pultowa and overthrow of Charles XII
249
Description of Douay
257
Siege and Capture of St Venant
263
Paltry Difficulties thrown in the Way of the Completion
269
Fatal Separation of Eugene with his Troops from Marlbor
276
Commencement of the Siege of Bouchain
282
Sect Pago 38 Interesting Operations on both sides during its Progress
283
Forces of the Allies and French in Flanders and desperate Situation of Louis
294
The Defection of Britain saves France
295
Siege and Capture of Quesnoy
296
Eloquent Speech of Lord Halifax in the House of Peers against the Peace
297
Marlboroughs Speech in seconding the Motion of Halifax
298
The Ministers falsely declare the Allies to be Parties to the Negotiation
299
Conditions of the Treaty of Utrecht
300
Mournful Separation of the English Contingent from the Allies
301
Great Difficulties now experienced in the Negotiation with France
302
Conclusion of the War between Austria and France at Ras tadt and the Dutch at Utrecht
303
Marlborough is received with the highest Honors on the Continent
305
Base Ingratitude of the Imperial Court to him
306
Continuod Malice against him at Home
307
Which arose from a Plan for the Restoration of the Stuarts
308
His domestic Bereavements and Stroke of Palsy
309
His last Years and Death
310
CHAPTER VII
312
Nature of the Feudal Wars
313
Great Change when Armies were paid by Government
314
Character of Condé
315
Peculiar Character of Marlborough as a General
316
His extraordinary Prudence and Address
317
Nature of War in the Time of Marlborough
318
Circumspection was in him a Matter of Necessity
319
He was compelled to adopt the System of Sieges and fix the War in Flanders
320
Dangers of the opposite System
321
He was the Perfection of Genius matured by Experience
322
His great Address and Suavity of Manner
323
His Character as a Statesman and in Private
324
His political Character after the Revolution
325
His Faults and Weaknesses
326
Circumstances which palliate these Faults in him
327
His Magnanimity and Humanity
328
His Character as drawn by Adam Smith and Bolingbroke
329
The five great Generals of Modern Times
330
Early Life of Eugene
331
Character of his Warfare and his first great Victory cver the Turks
332
His Campaigns in Italy and Germany
333
Sect Page 29 His astonishing Successes over the Turks
334
Narrow Escape from Ruin and wonderful Victory at Belgrade
335
His Character as a General and Parallel to Napoleon
336
Early Life of Frederic the Great
337
His Accession to the Throne and vigorous Application to its Duties
338
His Aggression on and Conquest of Silesia and first Victory at Mollwitz
339
His glorious Successes over the Austrians
340
His decided and indomitable Character already appears
341
His great Services to his Kingdom during the next ten Years of Peace
342
Frederic invades Saxony and conquers that Country
343
He defeats the Austrians at Prague and is defeated at Kolin
344
The Kings marvelous Victories at Rosbach and Leuthen
345
Disasters sustained by his Troops in other Quarters and Vic tory of Zorndorf
346
Frederics Defeat at Hohenkirchen
347
Overwhelming Misfortunes in other Quarters
348
Dreadful Battle and Victory of the Prussians at Torgau
349
Operations in the Camp of Bunzelwitz
350
The Death of the Empress of Russia restores his Affairs
351
54 Wonderful Result of the Struggle
352
His Character as a General
353
Comparison of Frederic and Napoleon
354
Of Marlborough and Wellington
355
Points in which their Situations differed
356
Great Superiority of Force with which Wellington had to contend
357
Their respective Characteristics
358
and why
359
Great and remarkable Land Triumphs of England over France
362
Long Series of Land Disasters sustained by France from En gland
363
What have been the Causes of this ?
364
CHAPTER VIII
365
Magnitude of the Danger which threatened Europe if France had proved successful
366
Results which might have followed the Triumph of France
367
Opposite Sides on Political Questions on which the Parties were ranged similar to what afterward occurred
368
opposed in the Time of Marlborough and Napoleon
369
Important Difference in the Parties by whom the War was 8 State of the opposite Parties in Great Britain since the Great Rebellion
370
The Union of Parties had brought about the Revolution
371
Dangers which flowed from the Revolution
372
The Funding System is introduced by William III
373
General Terrors it excited in Great Britain
374
Bolingbrokes Account of its Dangers
375
Bolingbrokes Account of the general Indignation at this de moralizing System
377
Strong Principles of Freedom and Loyalty in the English Character
378
Reaction of generous Feelings in favor of the Tories the advanced Period of the War
379
Which distinctly appeared in the Votes and Composition of the House of Commons
380
Character of Bolingbroke
381
His Inconsistencies and Faults
382
Sect Page 21 Character of Harley Earl of Oxford
384
It was these general Causes which overturned Marlborough
385
Great Violations of moral Rectitude in the Mode of their Attack on Marlborough
387
What was the Danger to be guarded against in the Peace
388
The Result has proved the Tories were wrong in their Policy regarding it
389
Disastrous Effects and Serious Dangers to England which followed the leaving a Bourbon on the Spanish Throne
390
Examples of this in later Times
391
These Dangers have arisen solely from the Spanish Alliance
392
It was a Sense of this Advantage which made Napoleon en gage in the Peninsular War
393
Causes which render the Alliance of Spain of such vital
394
Instance of the same Political Infatuation in our Times
395
Results which have followed from it in the last Instance
396
Strange Insensibility to National Sins which often prevails
397
Analogy between the Situation of the Tories in the War of the Succession and the Whigs in that of the Revolution
398
Extraordinary Coincidence in the Crisis of the two Contests
399
Real Causes of this Identity of Conduct of the opposite Parties on these Occasions
400
Excuses which existed for the Policy of the Tories at the Treaty of Utrecht from the Dread of Spain
401
Bolingbrokes Picture of the ruined State of the Spanish Monarchy at this period
402
But no Excuse can be found for our Violation of the Treaty of Utrecht by the Quadruple Alliance in 1834
404
Answer to the common Argument used in behalf of the Quadruple Alliance
405
Our active Interference to put down Don Carlos and the Male Line was still more unjustifiable
406
What England should have done on the Occasion
407
England has lost all Title to complain of any Violation of the Treaty of Utrecht
408
Great Change which the Substitution of the Female Line for the Male in Spain made in this Respect on the Interests of other Powers
409

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384. oldal - AWAKE, my St John ! leave all meaner things To low ambition, and the pride of kings. Let us (since life can little more supply Than just to look about us and to die) Expatiate free o'er all this scene of Man ; A mighty maze ! but not without a plan ; A wild, where weeds and flowers promiscuous shoot ; Or garden, tempting with forbidden fruit.
105. oldal - Twas then great Marlborough's mighty soul was proved, That, in the shock of charging hosts unmoved, Amidst confusion, horror, and despair, Examined all the dreadful scenes of war ; In peaceful thought the field of death surveyed, To fainting squadrons sent the timely aid, Inspired repulsed battalions to engage, And taught the doubtful battle where to rage.
162. oldal - Think nothing gain'd," he cries, " till nought remain, On Moscow's walls till Gothic standards fly, And all be mine beneath the polar sky." The march begins in military state, And nations on his eye suspended wait; Stern Famine guards the solitary coast, And Winter barricades the realms...
331. oldal - Marlborough was raised to the head of the army, and indeed of the confederacy, where he, a new, a private man, a subject, acquired by merit and by management a more deciding influence, than high birth, confirmed authority, and even the crown of Great Britain, had given to King William.
34. oldal - I hope the great advantage I enjoy under your Majesty, which I can never expect in any other change of government, may reasonably convince your Majesty and the world that I am actuated by a higher principle, when I offer that violence to my inclination and interest as to desert your Majesty...
162. oldal - On what foundation stands the warrior's pride? How just his hopes, let Swedish Charles decide; A frame of adamant, a soul of fire, No dangers fright him, and no labours tire...
288. oldal - Bay, either by way of restitution or cession ; and that both nations should continue to enjoy whatever territories they might be possessed of in North America at the ratification of the treaties. She likewise insisted upon a security that the crowns of France and Spain should never be united on the same head.
106. oldal - Inspired repulsed battalions to engage, And taught the doubtful battle where to rage. So when an angel, by divine command, With rising tempests shakes a guilty land (Such as of late o'er pale Britannia passed), Calm and serene he drives the furious blast ; And, pleased the Almighty's orders to perform. Rides in the whirlwind and directs the storm.
98. oldal - I have not time to say more, but to beg you will give my duty to the queen, and let her know her army has had a glorious victory. M. Tallard and two other generals are in my coach, and I am following the rest. The bearer, my aide-de-camp, Colonel Parke, will give her an account of what has passed. I shall do it, in a day or two, by another more at large. MARLBOROUGH.
257. oldal - I am very sorry to tell you, that the behaviour of the french looks as, if they had no other desire than that of carrying on the war. I hope God will be pleased to bless this campaign, for I see nothing else that can give us peace, either at home or abroad.

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