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Goodacre, Author of a Treatise on Arithmetic, Essay on Elocution, &c. 12mo. 4s. bound.

Tables for the Purchasing of Estates, freehold, copyhold, or leasehold, annuities, &c. and for the renewing of leases held under cathedral churches, colleges, or other corporate bodies, for terms or years certain, and for lives. Together with several useful and interesting tables, connected with the subject. Also the five tables of compound interest. By W. Inwood, Architect and Surveyor. 12mo. 7s.

Education.

The New Young Man's Companion, or the Youth's Guide to general Knowledge j designed chiefly for the Benefit of private persons of both sexes, and adapted to the capacities of beginners. In three parts. Embellished with four copper, and 88 wood-cuts. By John Hornsey. 12mo. 4s. bound.

English Parsing, comprising the rules of syntax, exemplified by appropriate lessons under each rule; with an index, containing all the parts of speech in the different lessons unparsed. For the use of schools, prirate teachers, and elder students. The second edition, improved and adapted to Lindley Murray's Grammar and Exercises. By James Giles. 12mo. 2s. 6d. bound.

The Rudiments of English Grammar elucidated, or a Guide to Parsing; in which the principles of grammar are unfolded to the understanding, and the exercise of parsing is rendered methodical and easy. By B. H. Smart, Private Teacher. 12mo. 3s. 6d.

A Series of Views of Picturesque and Romantic Scenery in Madeira, the Cape of Good Hope, Timor, China, Prince of Wales Island, Bombay, Mahratta Country, St. Helena, and Jamaica, engraved in a highly finished manner, by C. Heath, Woolnoth, and G. Cooke, from drawings made in those countries. By William Westall. Part I, containing three views in Madeira. 10s. Cd. j proof impressions, 15s.

GEOGRAPHY.

Cary's General Atlas, No, 18. containing Gangetic, Central and Southern Uindoostan. 4to. 3s. 6d.

HISTORY1.

Secret History of the Court of James the First; containing, '1. Osborne's traditional memoirs.—2. Sir Anthony Weldon's court and character of King James.—3. Aulicus Coquinarise.—4. Sir Edward Peyton's divine catastrophe of the House of Stuart. With notes and introductory remarks. Embellished with two engravings. 2 vols. 8vo. 11. 4s. royal paper 21. 2s.

Chronological Retrospect, or Memoirs of the principal Events of Mohammedan History, from the Death of the Arabian Legislator to the Accession of the Emperor Akbar and the Establishment of the Mogul Empire in Hindustaun. From original Persian authorities. By Major David Price of the East-India Company's service. To be completed in three volumes. Vol. 1.4to. 21. 8s.

MEDICINE.

A Letter to Dr. Jones on the Composition of the Eau Medicinale d'Husson. By James Moore, Member of the Royal College of Surgeons, Surgeon to the Second Regiment of Life Guards, and Director of the National Vaccine Establishment.

METAPHYSICS.'

Essays on the Nature and Principles of Taste. By Archibald Alison, LL.B. Prebendary of Sarum, &c. Senior Minister of the Episcopal Chapel, Cowgate, Edinburgh. The second edition, 2 vols. 8vo. 18s.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Miscellaneous Anecdotes, illustrative of the Manners and History of Europe, during the Reigns of Charles II., James II,, William III., and Anne. By James Peller Malcolm, Author of Anecdotes of the Manners and Customs of London, &c. &c. 8vo. 12s,

Essays on the Superstitions of the Highlands of Scotland. To which are added, translations from the Gaelic, and letters connected with these, formerly published. By Mrs. Qraht. 9 vols. 12mo. 12s.

Letters, Elegant, Interesting, and Evangelical; illustrative of the author's amiable character, and developing many circumstances of his history not generally known. Never before published. By James Hervey, M.A. Late Rector «f Weston Favell and Collingtree, Northamptonshire; Author of Theron and Aspasio, Meditations, Contemplations, fcc. 8vo. 7s.

The Savage. By Piomingo, a Headman and Warrior of the Musugulgee Nation. 12mo. 6s.

Fables by the late Mr. John Gay, in two parts, complete, with the author's life. Embellished with one hundred wood cuts, designed and engraved by Branston. 18mo. 3s. 6d.

Reviewers Reviewed; including an enquiry into the moral and intellectual effects of habits of criticism, and their influence on the general interests of literature. To which is subjoined, a brief history of the periodical Reviews published in England and Scotland. By \ John Charles O'Reid, Esq. 8vo. 2s. 6d.

MUSIC.

A Treatise on the Practice, Theory, and Harmonic System of the Violoncello, with delineations. By John Macdoriald, Esq. F. R. S. F.A.S. &c. folio 11.10s.

PHILOLOGY.

The Preparatory French Grammar; being an introduction to the Grammar and Exercises of Chambaud and Perrin. By Ann Lindley, 12mo. 2s. Gd. bound.

The French Scholar's Depository; in which are gradually developed, the most important elements of French conversation. By Ann Lindley, 12mo. 2s. 6d. bound.

POETRY.

The Minstrel j or the Progress of Ge■ius : with other poems, many of which, including the translations, are now reprinted from the scarce copies, and are not to be fonnd in any other edition. By James Beattie, LLD. To which are prefixed, Memoirs of the Life of the Author, by Alexander Chalmers, F.S.A. Ornamented with engravings by Heath, Neagle, &c. foolscap 8vo. 7s.

The Fall of Cambria; in twenty-four books. By Joseph Cottle. The second

edition, 2 vols. 8vo. 16s Nine Lyrical

Pieces having been added to this edition, they are printed separately for the Purchasers of the first edition, and will be delivered gratis, on application to the Publishers, through the medium of the respective Booksellers from whom the copies were obtained.

. • POLITICAL ECONOMY.

A Letter to the Rt. Hon. Lord Viscount Sidmouth upon the subject of the Bill, lately introduced by bis Lordship into the House of Peers, entitled, an Apt to explain and render more effectual certain Acts, &c. so far as the same relate to Protestant Dissenting Ministers. By Thomas Belsham, Minister of the Chapel in Essex-street, 8vo. 2s.

THEOLOGY.

A Theological Dictionary containing definitions of all religious terms; a comprehensive view of every article in the system of divinity; an impartial account of all the principal denominations which have subsisted in the religious world from the birth of Christ to the present day; together with an accurate statement of the most remarkable transactions and events recorded in ecclesiastical history. By the Rev. C. Buck. A new edition greatly improved. 2 vols. 8vo. 11. Is.

The Works of Beilby Porteus, D. D, late Lord Bishop of London. With an account of his Life. By the Rev. Robert Hodgson, A.M. F.R.S. &c. &c.

Criseos Griesbachianaa in Novum Testamentum Synopsis. Edidit Josephus White, S. T. P. Lingg. Hebr. et Arab. Prof, in Academia Oxoniensi, et iEdis Christi Canonicus. 8vo. 7s. 6d.

The National Religion the Foundation, of National Education: A Sermon, preached on Thursday, June 13th, in the Cathedral Church of St. Paul, at the yearly meeting of the Children educated in the Charity Schools in and about the Cities of London and Westminster. By Herbert Marsh, D.D. F.R.S. Margaret Professor of Divinity in the University of Cambridge. Preached and printed at the request of the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge. Is. or 9s. a dozen,

TOPOGRAPHY.

An Account of Tunis; of its Government, Manners, Customs, and Antiquities ; especially of its Productions, Manufactures, and Commerce. By Thomas Macgill, Author of Travels in Turkey, crown 8vo. 6s.

A Topographical Dictionary of Wales, compiled from actual inquiry. By Nicholas Carlisle, Fellow and Secretary of the Society of Antiquaries of London. 4to. 31. 3s.

The History, Topography, and Antiquisies, of the Parish of St. Mary, Islington, in the County of Middlesex. Including biographical sketches of several eminent and remarkable persons who have been rorn or have resided there. By John Nelson. Illustrated by seventeen engravings of the most interesting buildings and antiqu.lies, from original drawings. 4to. 21. 2s.

A View of the Jurisprudence of the Isle of Man; with the History of its ancient Constitution, Legislative Government, and extraordinary Privileges; together with the Practice of the Courts, &c. &c. By J. Johnson, Esq. 8vo. 10s. fid.

Description bf the Spar Cave, lately discovered in the Isle of Skye; with some Geological Remarks relative to that Island. By K. Macleay, M.D. To which is subjoined, the Mermaid, a poem. 8vo. 4s.

VOYAGES AND TRAVELS.

A Collection of Voyages and Travels m Asia; being the second portion of a General Collection of Voyages and Travels, forming a complete History of the

Origin and Progress of Discovery, by Sea and Land, from the earliest ages to the present time. Prece'ded by a historical introduction, and critical catalogue of books of voyages and travels, illustrated and adorned with numerous engravings. By John Pinkerton, Authorof Modern Geography, &c. 4 vols. 4to. 81. 8s.

TRAVELS.

Lachesis Lapponica; or, a Tour in Lapland; now first published from the Original Manuscript Journal of the celebrated Linnaeus. By James Edward Smith,, M. D. F. R. s- (and President of the Linnean Society). Illustrated by above sixty wood cuts from extemporaneous sketches of that illustrious Author. 2 vols. 8vo. 11. Is.

Travels in Various Parts of Europe, Asia, and Africa. By Edward Daniel Clarke, LL.D. Professor of Mineralogy in the University of Cambridge. Part the first, Russia, T'artary, and Turkey, Illustrated by near 100 engravings, the second edition, with considerable additions. 4to. 51. 5s.—The additions made to this new edition may be had separate. Price 3s. fid. sewed.

ERRATA.

Vage 557. I 23. far exist ence'read" exercise. —■ 573. 1, 5. before learning read the history of.

— 582. I. 3. for abhorrence wnrfabsence.

— 645. I. 22. for general read genuine. — 649. I. 25. for mutual read moral.

THE

ECLECTIC REVIEW,

For SEPTEMBER, 1811.

Art. I. The Life of Arthur Murphy, Esq. By Jesse Foot, Esq. his Executor. 4to. pp. 464. Price 21. 2s. Faulder. 1811.

A LL authors intend, as all readers are apprized, the public good, as their first object. And such is confessedly the moral state of society that the good intended must, in almost every particular instance, be of the nature of a corrective of some evil. Each book, therefore, may be regarded as a kind of medicinal preparation; and persons a little accustomed to inspect the practice in this department, can make a tolerable guess at the disease intended to be attacked, by a slight examination of what is prepared to be administered. Such an inspection of the present very costly composition, prepared in so large a quantity, leaves us no doubt of the apprehended prevalence of the disorder called Methodism. Some of the most efficacious sanatives and preservatives are, we believe, by many learned and many quack professors and practitioners against this melancholy distemper, reputed to be found in the theatrical part of the moral Materia Medica;—and here some of its most salutary powers are combined and exhibited in the vehicle of a thirty years' history of play-houses, and their players, and their plays.

But whatever may be the preventive operation of this laudable compound—and we will confess it is not ill adapted to have some effect in that way—we think it at least doubtful whether it will do much in the way of cure. As it would, too probably, be now in vain for us to pretend to have altogether escaped the contagion we have referred to, we have nothing to lose by confessing, that the result of the experiment on ourselves confirms our scepticism as to the remedial qualities of this work. We will own, th it though comedies and farces, actors and actresses, encores, clappings, and bens

Vol. VII. • 3 R

fit-nights, should all seem to bear some very strict relation to gaiety, we have felt a prevailing melancholy sentiment in going through the story of a man, the main business of whose indefatigable life was to communicate to society as large a measure as possible of that kind of advantage which it derives, from deputing a number of thousands of its least trusty members, to form, six nights a week, the grand congress of society and wisdom in a theatre. Through a gloomy perversity of feeling, incident to the complaint under which we labour—and which we humbly beg to plea'l, beforehand, in excuse for any puritanical hallucinations into which we may fall—the reflection would again and again come upon us," what a pitiful spectacle it is to see a man most earnestly bubbling his mind to make sentences to be conned and emitted, in the name of Timurkan, or Mandane, or Zenobia, or what not, by the tinselled profligate kings and queens of the green-room;—what a number of important subjects must have been absent from his thoughts during that vast portion of time that his mind was filled with images of the stage, pit, and boxes;—what a preparation for society in a more advanced stage of existence was likely to be acquired in the company of Woodward, Foote, Shuter, or Garrick ;—and what a balance he would have to strike, if he ever thought of such a matter, between the possible scantling of good done by a little slight morality in his plays, and the mischief done, at the same time, by the prodigious concourse of courtezans,—or, to put this consideration at its lowest degree of force, the mischief done through those circumstances and influences, by which a theatre surpasses most other scenes of public resort, in aiding the designs and accumulating at once the crimes and miseries of this most wretched class of destroyers.—But we will not open the way for the vast, the almost endless train of thoughts of the same gloomy kind, which would be suggested by the idea of the theatre, if seriously considered in all its connexions; nor enlarge on such as unavoidably suggest themselves in looking over the life of a man that laboured more, probably, than any writer of the last century, to promote the popularity of this grand "national school of morals."

Mr. Murphy wrote nearly as many, we should think, as twenty plays; a considerable number of which, it seems, collected, amused, and, as his aged biographer would doubtless maintain, instructed, in the Drury Lane and Covent Garden houses, large crowds of people, blooming and withered, comely and haggard, stylish and vulgar, who are now distributed in the burying grounds of the metropolis and of various other places, and most of them forgotten by a race

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