The Heath Readers: Primer, [First-sixth reader]

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D.C. Heath, 1903 - 352 oldal

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338. oldal - Like one that on a lonesome road Doth walk in fear and dread, And having once turned round walks on, And turns no more his head; Because he knows, a frightful fiend Doth close behind him tread.
264. oldal - Reading maketh a full man, conference a ready man, and writing an exact man. And therefore, if a man write little, he had need have a great memory; if he confer little, he had need have a present wit; and if he read little, he had need have much cunning, to seem to know that he doth not. Histories make men wise; poets, witty; the mathematics, subtle; natural philosophy, deep; moral, grave; logic and rhetoric, able to contend.
147. oldal - ULYSSES. IT little profits that an idle king, By this still hearth, among these barren crags, Match'd with an aged wife, I mete and dole Unequal laws unto a savage race, That hoard, and sleep, and feed, and know not me. I cannot rest from travel; I will drink Life to the lees: all times I have enjoy'd Greatly, have suffer'd greatly , both with those That loved me, and alone; on shore, and when Thro...
265. oldal - Cromwell, I did not think to shed a tear In all my miseries ; but thou hast forced me, Out of thy honest truth, to play the woman. Let's dry our eyes : And thus far hear me, Cromwell; And, — when I am forgotten, as I shall be, And sleep in dull cold marble, where no mention Of me more must be heard of...
200. oldal - Where the nibbling flocks do stray; Mountains, on whose barren breast The labouring clouds do often rest; Meadows trim with daisies pied, Shallow brooks, and rivers wide; Towers and battlements it sees Bosomed high in tufted trees, Where perhaps some beauty lies, The cynosure of neighbouring eyes.
294. oldal - O, now you weep ; and, I perceive, you feel The dint of pity ; these are gracious drops ; Kind souls ! What; weep you, when you but behold Our Ceesar's vesture wounded ? Look you here, Here is himself, marr'd, as you see, with traitors.
211. oldal - Let not this weak, unknowing hand Presume Thy bolts to throw ; And deal damnation round the land On each I judge Thy foe. If I am right, Thy grace impart Still in the right to stay ; If I am wrong, O teach my heart To find that better way.
213. oldal - No, sir, she has none. They are meant for us: they can be meant for no other. They are sent over to bind and rivet upon us those chains which the British ministry have been so long forging.
343. oldal - twas, that God Himself Scarce seemed there to be. "O sweeter than the marriage-feast, 'Tis sweeter far to me. To walk togcthei to the kirk With a goodly company! — "To walk together to the kirk, And all together pray. While each to his great Father bends, Old men, and babes, and loving friends. And youths and maidens gay...
339. oldal - This seraph-band, each waved his hand, No voice did they impart No voice; but oh! the silence sank Like music on my heart.

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