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the last coming not only from the Peace become the law for that people; and though Society, but from eminent writers who hold neither the thinkers nor the workers in Positivist views- Mr. G. H. Lewes, Mr. France are as yet unanimous in detestation Frederick Harrison, Mr. Congreve, Dr. of war, the current of opinions flows in that Bridges, Professor Beesley, and others. A direction. The truest French Liberals believe still more important feature in the move that the “ solidarity of peoples ” was one of ment is the manifestation of a solidarité be- the most vital principles developed by the tween the working classes of the western Great Revolution. Only those who, like part of the European continent. The organ M. Thiers, hang to the skirts of an effete of the co-operative societies, La Cooperation, Orleanism, a spurious constitutionalism an able journal published at Brussels, is filled which would ignore the people, still preach with addresses and answers that have passed the maintenance of a balance of power by between Associations of Artisans in France the sword. To the ignorant peasant, blindand Germany, all of which adopt without ed by the glitter of arms and deluded by the modification the entire creed of the “ Ligne fanaticism of priestly teachers as ignorant as de la Paix." The same exhibitions of unity of himself, the dream of European domination feeling and abnegation of national jealousies which dazzled even the great Emperor, and have taken place on the part of the students led him to bis ruin, may yet have vague and and professors in the universities, colleges, alluring charms; but the intelligent ouvrier and professional schools on either bank of of the great towns, who probably believes in the Rhine. Indeed, one of the most en- Fourier, who no doubt has read Cabet and couraging signs in the whole movement has Louis Blanc and the Economist, knows as been the tendency of the younger genera- well as Mr. Cobden or Mr. Gladstone what tion in France that which might be sup- war really is, and what it really does. He posed especially subject to fits of war fever knows that war means to him harder fare

to accept the principles of universal and slacker work, with no unlikely prospect peace.

of starvation for his wife and children in the The first Conference of the League was background. He wil not readily accept this beld on April 23d, in the splendid amphi- fate to serve the purposes of others to theatre of the Ecole de Médecine, and has prop a falling cause, or to cover marshals proved, we believe, a complete success. Le and generals with “ “glory." Temps, and the other journals throughout France and Belgium that have joined the League publish almost daily very copious lists of the names of new supporters, and there

are indications that an International Union will grow out of M.

Sybils Second Love. By Julia Kavanagh. Frédéric Passy's idea. It is too soon, of Three vols. (Hurst and Blackett.) — Miss course, to predict anything of an enterprise Kavanagh ought not to spoil a genuine style by apparently so desperate as the extinction of attempts at sensation. Her forte lies in quiet war, especially when that enterprise origi- portraiture, as she has shown in some novels of nates among the most warlike people in the high merit. ' But since other lady writers have world. But we should guard ourselves from earned a transient fame, and money which we the easy triumph of sneering at a sincere hope they have invested more profitably, Miss and a determined effort of a few honest men Kavanagh has also tried her hand at murder to paralyze the pernicions influence of that and mystery. We say murder, though we are passion for military glory which has done so not sure that a murder is intended, but we nevmuch to retard the advance of Europe in er arrive at a satisfactory solution of the great the path of civilization and prosperity. We riddle in Sybil's Second Love. Sybil herself is a have little doubt that the numerical major- charming character, and there is power in the ity of the French nation is still, as in the portrait of her husband, as well as in that of days of Napoleon 1., intoxicated with the her bosom friend and false stepmother. But splendour of the battle-field ; but we are quite certain that the number and the influ- both of these last suffer from the mystery to ence of those who believe in the opposite which we have alluded, and while Miss Kavandoctrine who regard war as an unholy agh makes them scheme she thinks herself aband brutal thing, to be justified only by the solved from the necessity of keeping them natumost stringent necessity are increasing ral. We regret these blemishes, for the novel is and will continue to increase. Anything good in many points, and may occupy a conwith respect to which the brain and the spicuous place in the list of those to be orderhands of a people are at one must ultimately led from Mudie's. — Spectator.

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