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J U N E.

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436

438

Α Ρ Ρ Ε Ν DI X.
Encyclopedize Poetica, or a complete Collection of fugitive Pieces

425
Hurtant's Historical Dictionary of the City of Paris

430

The History of Laurent Marcel

433

ib.

Memoirs on Mathematics and Natural History

ib.

Treatise againt the Love of Dress and Luxury

Bocacio's Tales

434

ib.

Limbourg's Appeal

Heilman's Works

435

ib,

An Essay on the taking of Oaths

Goethen's Works

Wesel's Comedies

ib.

Lee's Theory of the Christian Religion

437

ib.

Baader's Effay on the Study of Philosophy

Programma

Cerrati's Works

439

Cheralier D'Eon's Life

iba

Cæsar in Britain

440

ib.

Ariquibar's Works

Colomer's Instruction for Children

ib.

ib.

Juan's Essay on Mechanics

Occafional Letters on Taxation

441

The Affociaturs vindicated

ib.

Letters of Papinian

ib.

Observations on an Address to the Freeholders of Middlesex

442

ib.

Thoughts on the present County Petitions

ib.

Mr. E- B_'s Answer to his own Speech

Cool Thoughts

on American Independence

443

ib.

Hartley's Address to the Committee of the City of York

ib.

Copies of the Proceedings of the County of Wilts

The Yorkshire Question

Observations on American Independency

444

The Detail and Conduct of the American War

ib.

Substance of the Speeches made in the House of Commons, on Dec. 15, 1779 ib.

A Letter from a Gentleman in the English House of Commons, in Vindication

of his Conduct with regard to the Affairs of Ireland

445

ib.

A Letter to the Right Honourable the Earl of Sandwich

ib.

An Enquiry intc, and Remarks upon the Conduct o: Lieut. Gen. Burgoyne

ib.

Remarks on Gen. Burgoyne's State of the Expedition from Canada

Debates in the Irish House of Commons

A Letter to Edmund Burke, Esq;

Hardy's Answer to Kiollay

ib.

Foreign Medical Review

ib.

Remarks respecting wounded Seamen and Marines

447

ib,

Rowley's Cure of the Gout and Rheumatism

ib.

Ruin seize thee, ruthless King

Rebellion and Opposition

ib.

The Caffle of Infamy

Dignum to Buckhorse

Sir Ebrius, a Tale for Batchelors

ib.

ib.

Epiftle to R. B. Sheridan, Esq;

449

The Prophecy, a Poem

ib.

A Sketch of the Times

ib.

Private Thoughts on Public Affairs

ib.

The Reasonable Animal

450

ib.

ib.

Hobby-Horse

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The Deaf Lover, a Farce
Letters between Clara and Antonia
The Relapse, a Novel
The Reformer
Love and Madness
Address to the People of England
Erkine's Sermon
Bagot's Sermon
Bellas's Sermon
Wakefield's Sermon
Maskham's Sermon
Robertson's Sermon
Watson's Sermon
Warren's Sermon
Bishop of St. David's Sermon on the General Faft
Rees's Sermon
Corowallis's Sermon
A Sermon by the Lord Bishop of Lincoln
Tripp's Sermon
Whitcumbe's Sermon
A national Change in Morals, &c, a Sermon
Williamson's Sermon

ib. 451 ib. ib. ib, 452 ib. ib. ib. ib. 453 ib. ib, ib, 454 454

ib. 455 ib. ib. ib, 456

1

3

THE

LONDON REVIEW,

FOR JANUARY 1780.

A new History of Gloucestershire; comprising the Topography,

Antiquities, Curiofities, Produce, Trade, and Manufactures of that County; the Foundation, Charters, and Endowments of Abbies, and other Religious Houses, the Foundation of the Bishoprick, &c. with a short Biographical Account of the Bishops and Deans, the Names of the Patrons and Incumbents, and the ancient and present Value of all the Ecclefiaftical Bea nefices, Charters of Incorporation, and Civil Government of the several Boroughs; Descriptions of the principal Seats; Descent of the Manors ; Genealogies of Families, with their Arms, Monumental Inscriptions, &c. In the Course of this Work is given the History of every Parish, Tithing, and Extra-Parochial Place in the County. Also the Ecclefiaftical, Civil, and Military History of the City of Gloucester,

from its first Foundation to the present Time. With a copy of the Domesday- Book of Gloucestershire, now first printed in the Language, and after the Manner of the Original. Illustrated with a Map of the County, Views of Gentlemen's Seats, &c. & Folio. 31. 35. Rudder, Gloucester ;. Crowder, London

(Concluded from page 358.) IN treating of the town of Cirencester, Mr. Rudder observes that

« This is called an ancient city, and, according to the opinion of some persons, of fo high antiquity as to have been built by the Britons before the Roman invasion. But that the Britons had then any cities or towns, in the sense we now understand those terms, is a notion very contrary to the testimony of ancient authors of the greatest credit as to that matter. Cæfar indeed speaks of their towns, but he tells us what they were ;* Oppidum autem

* De Bello Gallico, l. 4. c. 21. p 120.

B

VOL. XI.

Britanni Britanni vorant quum sylvas impeditas vallo atque folla munierunt.' The Britons call that a town, when they have surrounded and fenced about their thickest woods with a bank and a ditch. And Xiphilin speaking of the Mæotæ, or inhabitants of the now most northeça counties of England, afferts that they had neither walls nor cities; what passed under the name of cities in Britain, being, according to Strabo, no other than groves. These authorities will ftand their ground against the fund and loose conje&ures of later writers; and upon this ground I shall venture to say that Cirencester was built by the Romans. The precise time of its founda. tion I do not pretend to ascertain, but I apprehend it might be very soon after they had established themselves in Britain. Three great roads meeting in this place, rendered it the most desirable lituation for a town that can be conceived, and no doubt that circumflance induced them to make choice of it.

“ Being the metropolis of the large province of the Dobuni, was called Corinium Dobunorum, and became a very eminent station for the Roman armies. Antoninus places it at the distance of fourteen miles from Glevum or Gloucefter, in the thirteenth Iter from Isca, now. Caerleon in Monmouthshire, to Callevá, which Dr. Gale will have to be Henley, the Calleva Attrebatum, or chief city of the Attrebatii, whilst others give that honour to Wallingford in Berkshire.

" The wall and ditch which inclosed the old city, were more than two miles in circumference. Dr. Stukeley, about the year 1723, traced them quite round, as Leland had done before him ; but even in Leland's time there were but few vestiges of the wall reinaining;

-Sic omnia fatis In pejus ruere, ac retro fublapfa referri. VIRG: * He tells

may yet, walking on the bank of Churne, evidently perceyve the cumpace of foundation of towers fumtyme standing in the waul.' And nere to the place wher the right goodly clothing mylle was set up a late by the abbate, was broken down the ruine of 'an old tower toward making of the mylle waultes, in the which place was found a quadrate stone fawllen down afore, but broken in aliquot fruftra, wherein was a Romain inscription, of the which, one fcantly lettered that faw yt, told me, that he might percéyve Pont. Max. Among divers numismata found frequently there, Dioclefian's be most faireft; but I cannot adfirme the infcription to have bene dedicate onto hyin. In the middes of the old town in a medow, was found a flore de refellis verficoloribus, and by the town noftris temporibus was fownd a broken Thank bone of a horse, the mouth closed with a pegge; the which taken owi, a shepard found yt fillid nummis ar. gentsis. In the fouth-south-west fice of the waul be lykelyhood hath bene a caftel, or sum other great building, the hilles and diches yet remayne. The place is now a waren for conys, and

therin

US,

that

a man

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