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“ Suffice it to say, that the author of Sutton-Abbey hopes the employment of her pen will, if it gives not instruction, be at least an innocent amusement to many of her countrywomen.

" The motive that impelled her to publish it is a just one ;one which the is persuaded, would, if he dare avow it, raise the smile of approbation, and blind the eye of censure. That she may deserve the critic's frown she is too sensible of, to present her, pages without the greatest fear, and that she may escape the eye of censure, is the humbie and sincere with of,

Gentlemen,
with the greatest respect,

yours, &c. &c." 'Tis cruel to the last degree, to deny a lady a reasonable request. We for our parts willingly pay all imaginable respect.to the fair-sex; but then, in our official capacity, as critical grey-beards, we must not be influenced so far by their kind speeches, as to permit them entirely to bias our judgment. In this case we are inclined to the merciful side. However, we cannot with justite class our petitioning fair-one, with those British ladies, who form a constellation in the literary world. They have left her in a lower sphere, where she sheds only a dim and glimmering light.

We advise (as friends) our author to study the English Grammar with attention, in cafe she has any design of appearing in print again, as the present novel contains feveral grammatical inacuracies.

* To do our author justice, we will lay before our readers a letter. From this they will in some measure be capable of forming a judgment of her merit.

The following letter contains a Sifter's Advice to a Brother

* My dear Edward defires to hear from his fifter Fanny. I comply with his defire in compliment to his request : though had it been made to your mama, my dear, it woud have been much better fulfilled. It will, I fear, appear presumption in me, to piesume to dictate to you while you are blessed with her. But I, hope to convey her sentiments to you. My affection fuggests, a thousand fears! You are going into a new world ; you rush at . sance from the maternal wing, ainongít a set of beings who are almoft perfect strangers to you.

The hurried imagination of youth, sees good and bad alike-l fear for you. --The first friends of young people very often Itamp their future dispositions : be careful then with whom you contract an intimacy; let merit alone attach you :---your disposition is naturally good, but you must endeavour to conquer that warmth of temper which as yet I have observed but to encrease ; you are to consider life as a long voyage;: our unruly passions are the rocks we often split upon the forms fatat to our peace!

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Oft in the passion's wild rotation toft,
Our spring of action in ourselves is lost :
Fir'd, not derermin’d, to the last we yield,

And what comes then is maiter of the field. “ The greatest knowledge is ' ourselves to know.' Attain that knowledge, conquer every unruly passion, and make yourself the favourite of God and man. While

you pay a strict obfervance to the laws of your heavenly Father, and give him the worship due to him, you need not fear his protection. It is a very mittaken opinion some people have, that when they grow old, and have lost all relish for this world, it is time enought to think of their God! Had you a dependant who refused to serve you when in his youth and strength, would you,

do
you
think

pay that attention to his attempts when you know they proceeded from an inability to serve any other? Let me, therefore, beg of you, my dear brother, to remeinber thy Creator in the days of thy youth. • Leave thy fatherless children to me, faith the Lord, and I will preserve them alive.' Not as to this world only, but to eternity! Fear God, and you will have nothing else to fear--secure you will finile amidst the dreadful storm ; your hope is in him only who is able to preserve you. I need hardly mention the attention you must pay to those who have the command of you: it is fo necessary to gain what we all defire, the esteem of our fuperiors, that I sup. pose it natural to you. Consider your proper behaviour, in every respect, is necessary to the peace of a tender parent, who places all the enjoyment in the prosperity of her children, and to the happiness of your sisters, who love you with tenderness. No idle excuse will ever be allowed for your disliking a life that has ever been your own choice-Indeed, I believe and hope you

will never have a wish to quit it till, by your steady application, you have gained sufficient to remain the rest of your days in your native land. A desire of riches seems not yet to caine your dawning virtues :-never let it approach your heart, my dear brother ; for a thirst after them is the bane to peace and virtue-never is that thirst satisfied; like a consuming fire is destroys every generous noble prin. ciple, and leaves not a tract of the human heart; imbitters all our joys, for be assured,

'Tis not vain grandeur that contentment brings,

From our own minds the satisfaction springs. “ Happiness is our constant search here on earth, how few, comparatively speaking, arcain it? The reason is obvious : how few search for it aright! Some think to find it in greatness, the mere eccho of a naine, some in riches, vain pursuit!

come in fame.

6. What's fame? a fancy'd life in others breath,

A thing beyond us, e'en before our death!
Some run the round of pleasure's giddy maze !

- And e'en while fashion's brightest arts decoy,
The heart difrusting, aiks if this be joy?

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66 For

“ For a fucccssful search after happiness, give me leave to refer you to the admirable author I have before mentioned, whose lines on the subject I will transcribe for you, as you may not have them at hand.

" Know then this truth (enough for man to know),
Virtue alone is happiness below ;
The only point where human blifs stands ftill,
And tastes the good, without the fall to ill;
Where only merit confiant pay receives,
Is bless'd in what it takes, and what it gives.
The joy unequall'd, if its end it gain,
And if it lose, attended with no pain.
Without fatiety, tho'e'er so bless'd,
And but more relish'd, as the more difress'd.
The broadeit nirth unfeeling folly wears,
Less pleasing far, than virtue's very tcars.
Good from each object, from each place acquir'd,
For ever excercis'd, yet never tir’d:
Never elated while one man's oppress'd,
Never dejected while another's bless'd :
And where no wants, no willies can remain

Since but to wish more virtues is to gain. şi Adieu my beloved brother! may one prosperous gale attend you through life. May every just wish of your heart be accom, plished, and may many succeeding years find us in the poffeffion of those btessings we now enjoy; and if it be Heaven's will, may they increale.- But let us always think, Whatever is, is right!

Should the above extract be insufficient to gratify the taste of any of our readers, we refer such to the performance itself, so that they may carve for themselves,

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Poems to her Majesty. To which is added a new Tragedy entitled

the Earl of Somerset : literally founded on History; with a prefatory Address, 86, By Henry Lucas, A, M. Studeni of the Middle Temple, Author of the Tears of " Alnwick, Vifit from

the Shades, 66, Printed for the Author. 4to. Is. 6d, | Dayis,

After reading the Conflią, a poem, inserted in the prefatory address to the tragedy, we should consider ourselves indeed ill-natựred, were we to use that frietness of criticism which might damp a genius whose heart and mind both feein entirely devoted to literature, notwithstanding he appears the student for the bar. We therefore, to assist him in his suit to the Muses, thall first, to encourage him in his progress, observe his perfections, and to removę impediinents

,to

to the ladies favour, we shall point out such as may in his next plea be avoided,

Melpomene is a coy dame, and requires so many perfections in her votaries, that few---very few have been so happy as to succeed in their fuit. Although she is serious herself, she likes fpirit in those who folicit her good graces. Although gravity pleases her, it must be attended by ease, grace, and dignity. So that the affection of a pedant ill suits' that majestic ease which, above all, pleases her the most.

But to have done with her ladyfhip, and to attend to the offering Mr. Lucas has made her, we proceed to observe some particulars relative to its characters, paffion, sentiments, and language.

The choice of the story is calculated to shew the bad effects of inordinate love, and ill-placed ambition. Two passions which more interest and injure inankind than all the rest. So that he deserves every praise for its choice, especially as it is founded on our own history.

The characters are, in generally, tolerably drawn, excepting Rochester. We think the point of his pencil was rather dull in not making his features more striking of the artful courtier who risqued, and thereby lost the life of an innocent friend, for being too fincerely interested in his welfate, and also to gratify his luft of title and inordinate love of an ambitious wanton.

He has, however, made ample amends in his character of James. In his, we perceive the strokes of a master. His traits are finely agreeable to those of history. The ctedulous dupe of his own pride and vanity, and the would-have-been tyrant, but for the weakness of his head and pufillanimity of his heart. Qbserve the following soliloquy.

" What is prerogative, or right divine,
If ev'ry subject dares at it's controul ?---
Must kingly patience crouch, as in the toil,
Slave to each minion's will ? Must monarchy
Descend fo vilely low, to fupplicate
The vaffal's duty, in his country's cause?
First would we hurl the sceptre from our hand,
Ere we'd degrade that pow'r, thro' life enjoy'd,
To send a prouder wight on public service!
Well does the Roman proverb bid“ confine
" Each in his proper spbere ! " Here, double traitor!
Not only scorn our honour, but affert,
That RochESTER---the parent of his state..p
Will answer his refusal..-his own vords
Shall judge him, and condemn..."

In

“ For a successful search after happiness, give me leave to pr. you to the admirable author I have before mentioned, whole liit ; on the subject I will transcribe for you, as you may not ! them at hand.

" Know then this truth (enough for man to know),
Virtue alone is happine?s below;
The only point where human blifs stands ftill,
And tastes the good, without the fall to ill;
Where only merit confiant pay receives,
Is bless'd in what it takes, and what it gives,
The joy unequall'd, if its end it gain,
And if it lose, attended with no pain.
Without fatiety, tho' e'er to bless’d,
And' but more relish'd, as the more distress'd.
The broadest mirth unfeeling folly wears,
Less pleasing far, than virtue's very tiars.
Good from each object, from each place acqui:
For ever excercis'd, yet never tir'd:
Never elated while one man's oppress'd,
Never dejected while another's bless'd :
And where no wanıs, no willies can remain

Since but to wish more virtues is to gain. $ Adieu

my

beloved brother! may one propers" you through life. May every just wish of your in plished, and may many succeeding years find us in those bteffings we now enjoy: and if it be Heavis increale.- But let us always think, Whatever is,

Should the above extract be insufficient 10 : of

any of our readers, we refer such to the li so that they may carve for themselves,

.

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Poems to her Majesty. To which is added a

the Earl of Somerset : literally founded co fatory Address, &c, By Henry Lucas, Middle Temple, Author of the Tears

the Shades, 86. Printed for the | Dayis,

After reading the Confliâ,-a po: tory address to the tragedy, we st. deed ill-natured, were we to use which inight damp a genius who entirely devoted to the student for t? suit to the Mu'

gress, observ

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