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ME MOIR OF M A R Y HO WIT T.

MARY Howitt was born at Coleford, in Gloucestershire, where her parents were making a temporary residence; but shortly after her birth they returned to their accustomed abode at Uttoxeter, in Staffordshire, where she spent her youth. The beautiful Arcadian scenery of this part of Staf.

fordshire was of a character to foster a deep love

of the country; and is described with great ac

continued to reside till about twelve months ago, and are now living at Esher, in Surrey. Mary Howitt published jointly with her husband two volumes of miscellaneous poems, in 1823; and, in 1834, she gave to the world “The Seven Temptations,” a series of dramatic poems; a work which, in other times, would have been alone sufficient to have made and secured a very

curacy in her recent prose work, “Wood Leigh- high reputation: her dramas are full of keen perton.” By her mother she is descended from an ceptions, strong and accurate delineations, and ancient Irish family, and also from Wood, the ill- | powerful displays of character. She afterwards used Irish patentee, who was ruined by the selfish prepared for the press a collection of her most malignity of Dean Swist,-from whose aspersions popular ballads, a class of writing in which she his character was vindicated by Sir Isaac New- greatly excels all her contemporaries. She is also ton. A true statement of the whole affair may be well known to the young by her “Sketches of

seen in Ruding’s “Annals of Coinage.” Charles Natural History,” “Tales in Verse,” and other

Wood, her grandfather, was the first who introduced platina into England from Jamaica, where he was assay-master. Her parents being strict members of the society of Friends, and her father being, indeed, of an old line who suffered persecution in the early days of Quakerism, her education was of an exclusive character; and her knowledge of books confined to those approved of by the most strict of her own people, till a later period than most young persons become acquainted with them. Their effect upon her mind was, consequently, so much the more vivid. Indeed, she describes her overwhelming astonishment and delight in the treasures of general and modern literature, to be like what Keats says his feelings were when a new world of poetry opened upon him, through Chapman's “Homer,”—as to the astronomer, “When a new planet swims into his ken.” Among poetry there was none which made a stronger impression than our simple old ballad, which she and a sister near her own age, and of similar taste and temperament, used to revel in, making at the same time many young attempts in epic, dramatic, and ballad poetry. In her twenty-first year she was married to William Howitt, a gentleman well calculated to encourage and promote her poetical and intellectual tastehimself a poet of considerable genius, and the author of various well-known works. We have reason to believe that her domestic life has been a singularly happy one. Mr. and Mrs. Howitt spent the year after their marriage in Staffordshire. They then removed to Nottingham, where they

productions written expressly for their use and pleasure.

Mrs. Howitt is distinguished by the mild, unaffected, and conciliatory manners, for which “the people called Quakers” have always been remarkable. Her writings, too, are in keeping with her character: in all there is evidence of peace and good-will; a tender and a trusting nature; a gentle sympathy with humanity; and a deep and fervent love of all the beautiful works which the Great Hand has scattered so plentifully before those by whom they can be felt and appreciated. She has mixed but little with the world; the home-duties of wife and mother have been to her productive of more pleasant and far happier results than struggles for distinction amid crowds; she has made her reputation quietly but securely; and has laboured successfully as well as earnestly to inculcate virtue as the noblest attribute of an English woman. If there be some of her contemporaries who have surpassed her in the higher qualities of poetry, some who have soared higher, and others who have taken a wider range, there are none whose writings are better calculated to delight as well as inform. Her poems are always graceful and beautiful, and often vigorous; but they are essentially feminine: they afford evi. dence of a kindly and generous nature, as well as of a fertile imagination, and a safely-cultivated mind. She is entitled to a high place among the Poets of Great Britain; and a still higher among those of her sex by whom the intellectual rank of woman has been asserted without presumption, and maintained without display.

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HYMNS AND FIRE-SIDE VERSES.......

BIRDS AND FLOWERS,

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AND OTHER COUNTRY THINGS: The Stormy Peterel............ -The Poor Man's Garden.................

The Apple-Tree........................ The Heron ........ --------------The Rose of May....................... The Dor-Hawk.... --------------The Oak-Tree......................... .

The Raven .........

Flower Comparisons ----
Little Streams........ --
The Wolf............
The Passion-Flower .. --

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The Carrion-Crow.................
Buttercups and Daisies ............
The Titmouse, or Blue-Cap

| Sunshine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Elephant........ - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
The Wild Swan......... .
The Mill-Stream .....
Summer....... - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
The Falcon............ . . . . . . . . .
The Child and the Flowers .... ...
The Flax-Flower ................
The House-Sparrow ...............
Childhood............ . . . . . . . . . . . .

The Woodpecker. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Harebell .......... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Screech Owl ...............

L'Envoi...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SKETCHES OF NATURAL HISTORY:
The Coot.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Camel ........ . . . . . . . . .
Cedar Trees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Monkey ...... . . . . . . . . . - - - -
The Fossil Elephant.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Locust ..... -
The Broom-Flower ..
The Eagle..........
The Nettle-King.......

The Bird of Paradise .......... . . . . . . . . .

The Carolina Parrot............ . . . . . . . . .

The Use of Flowers ....................

Flower Paintings........ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Page

Song for the Ball-Players................. 184

The Kitten's Mishap........ 185

Spring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... - ib.

Life among the Mountains... ...... 186

Pilgrims................ . ... ..... ib.

The Cowslips ............ .... 187

The Indian Bird. . . . . . - - - - - - ..... ib.

The Children's Wish . . . . . . . ............ 189

The English Mother.................... ib.

The Departed. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... .... 190

A Poetical Chapter on Tails ............. ib.

MISCELLANEOUS PIECES.... . . . . . . . . . . . 192

The Voyage with the Nautilus. . . . . . . . . . . ib.

Deliciae Maris. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - - 193

Flowers ............................... 194

The Sale of the Pet Lamb of the Cottage... 195

The Faëry Oath ... ..................... 196

Child's Faith .......... ... .... 197

America. ............ -- ... ib.

The Doomed King...... ... 200

The Dream of Peticius. . . . - .... 203

Lodore, a Summer Vision................ ib.

Du Guesclin's Ransom .................. 204

The Household Festival... . . . . 205

The Three Ages ...... -- ... ib.

Mourning on Earth ... ... .... 206

Rejoicing in Heaven ....... ... . . . . . . . th:

The Temple of Juggernaut .............. 207

Household Treasures .................... ib.

The Mosque of Sultan Achmet .......... ib.

The Source of the Jumna ............... 208

The Baron's Daughter . . . . . . . . . ......... 209

Smyrna ........... ...... 210

Oliver Cromwell ..... ........ ii.

Marshal Soult.......................... ib.

The Valley of the Sweet Waters......... 211

The Burial-Ground at Sidon ............. th:

The Arrival ........................... 212

An English Grave at Mussooree.......... 213

The Odalique ............ .... 214

The Tomb of St. George .... ... ib.

Vespers in the Capelle Reale ... 215

Newcastle-upon-Tyne................... ib.

View near Deobun, among the Himalayas. 216

The New Palace of Mahmoud II. ........ 217

The Monastery of Santa Saba ........... ib.

The Gipsy Mother's Song................ ib.

The Ordeal of Touch ... ... ... ... 218

The Andalusian Lover .................. ib.

Installation of the Bishop of Magnesia .... 219

A Forest Scene in the days of Wickliffe ... 220

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