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Then, Lovers, doom'd to life or death,

Shun moonlight, twilight, lanes, and bats,
Lest you should have in self-same breath
To bless your fate—and curse the gnats.

Hood.

Does she love me? I ask you. Not a whit.

Robert Browning May 14.

Alas! how light a cause may move;
Dissension between hearts that love-
Hearts that the world in vain had tried,
And sorrow but more closely tied.

Moore

(Lalla Rookh) Of honey and of gall in love there is storeThe honey is much, but the gall is more.

Spenser

(The Shepherd's Calendar).

May 15.

But, ah! too soon his thoughtless breast
By cares domestic is oppressed,
And a third butcher's bill and brewing
Threaten inevitable ruin.

T. Warton.

'Look, what is done cannot be now amended.

Shakespeare

(King Richard III.).

May 14.

May 15.

The kindest and the happiest pair
Will find occasion to forbear,
And something every day they live
To pity, and perhaps forgive.

Cowper.

I know not her that willingly in maidenhood would die.

William Warner.

May 17.

Now, success to the fair-one and all

No misapprehensions be making ;
Though wrong the dear sex to mis-call,
There's no harm I should hope in miss-taking!

Mrs. Cornwell B. Wilson.
My other self ! our blood, our hearts, our souls,
Shall henceforth mingle in one being, like
The married colours in the bow of heaven.

Alexander Smith.
May 18.

Great are the sea and the heaven ;
Yet greater is my heart,
And fairer than pearls and stars
Flashes and beams my love.

From the German, by Longfellow.
My own sweet bride, the guiding star
That Heaven lent in love.

Shakespeare

(King Richard III.).

May 17.

May 18.

I've waited for thee many seasons through,
Seen many autumns shed their yellow leaves; ...
Now am I joyful as storm-battered dove
That finds a perch in the Hesperides,
For thou art found.

Alexander Smith.
Women who marry seldom act but once ;
Their lot is, ere they wed, obedience
Unto a father; thenceforth to a husband.

Westland Marston, LL.D.

May 20. A nymph, no tongue, no heart, no eye, might praise,

might wish, might see, For life, for love, for form, more good, more worth, more fair, than she !

William Warner. Then come the wild weather, come sleet or come snow, We'll stand by each other however it blow.

Longfellow

(Annie of Tharaw).
May 21.
Things base and vile, holding no quantity,
Love can transpose to form and dignity.
Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind,
And therefore is winged Cupid painted blind.

Shakespeare

(Midsummer Night's Dream).
In love, if love be love, if love be ours,
Faith and unfaith can ne'er be equal powers ;
Unfaith in aught is want of faith in all.

Tennyson

(Vivien's Song)

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