Oldalképek
PDF
ePub
[ocr errors]

14.

18. T

ទៅ ៩៩ ៩៩ 141

[ocr errors]

DEDICATION to the English Nation

PREFACE

Letter

1. Junius to the Printer of the Public Ad.

1

vertiser

2. Sir W. Draper's Answer to the former

Letter of Junius, addressed to the Printer 11

3. Junius to Sir William Draper

16

20

4. Sir Williain Draper to Junius

5. To Sir William Draper

26

6. To Junius, from Sir William Draper 28

7. To Sir William Draper

29

8. To his Grace the Duke of Grafton - 33

9. To his Grace the Duke of Grafton - 38

10. To Mr. Edward Weston

41

11. To his Grace the Duke of Grafton

43

12. To his Grace the Duke of Grafton 48

13. Philo Junius to the Printer of the Public

Advertiser

56

14. Philo Junius to the Printer of the Public

Advertiser

15. To his Grace the Duke of Grafton 64

16. To the Printer of the Public Advertiser 68

17. Philo Junius to the Printer of the Public

Advertiser

73

18. To Sir William Blackstone, Solicitor Ge.

neral to her Majesty

76

19. Philo Junius to the Printer of the Public

Advertiser

82

20. Junius to the Printer of the Pub. Adver. 90

21. To the Printer of the Public Advertiser 99

29. Philo Junius to the Printer of the Public

Advertiser

100

23. Junius to the Duke of Bedford

103

24. Sir William Draper to Junius

113

25. Junius to Sir William Draper

26. Sir William Draper to Janius

116

27. Janius to the Printer of the Pub. Adver. 124

119

28. To the Printer of the Public Advertiser 129

29. Philo Junius to the Printer of the Public

30. Janias to the Printer of the Pub: Adver. 134

ib.

31. Philo Junius to the Printer of the Public

Advertiser

32. Junius to the Printer of the Public Ad.

vertiser

145

a

[ocr errors]

33. To his Grace the Duke of Grafton 146

34. To his Grace the Duke of Grafton 147

35. To the Printer of the Public Advertiser 159

36. To the Duke of Grafton

170

37. To the Printer of the Public Advertiser 180

38. To the Printer of the Public Advertiser 185

39. To the Printer of the Public Advertiser 192

40. To Lord North

41. To the Right Hon. Lord Mansfield 207

42. To the Printer of the Public Advertiser 219

43. Philo Junius to the Printer of the Public

Advertiser -

228

44. Junius to the Printer of the Pub. Ad. 232

45. Philo Jupius to the Printer of the Public

Advertiser

46. Philo Junius to the Printer of the Public

Advertiser

245

47. Philo Junius to the Printer of the Public

Advertiser

48. Philo Junius to the Printer of the Public

Advertiser

249

49. Junius to the Duke of Grafton

253

50. To his Grace the Duke of Grafton - 258

51. From the Rev. Mr. Horne to Junius - 262

52. Junius to the Rev. Mr. Horne

265

53. From the Rev. Mr. Horne to Junius

- 268

54. Junius to the Printer of the Public Ad-

vertiser

289

55. Philo Junius to the Printer of the Public

Advertiser

292

56. The Rev. Mr. Horne to Junius

294

97. Junius to his Grace the Duke of Grafton 295

58. Addressed to the Livery of London - 309

59. To the Printer of the Public Advertiser 304

60. Philo Junius to the Printer of the Public

Advertiser

314

61. Philo Junius to Zeno

317

62. Philo Junius to an Advocate in the

cause of the People

329

63. Observations by a Friend of Junius in

answer to a Barrister at Law

324

64. Declaration iv behalf of Junius

326

65. Junius to Lord Chief Justice Mansfield

329

66. Junius engages to make good his Charge

against Lord Mansfield

. 330

67. Junius to the Duke of Grafton

- 331

68. To Lord Chief Justice Mansfield

- 335

69. To the Right Hon. Lord Camden

[ocr errors][merged small]

I DEDICATE to you a Collection of Letters, written by one of yourselves, for the coinmon benefit of us all. They would never have grown to this size, without your continued encouragement and applause. To me they originally owe nothing but a healthy sanguine constitution. Under your care they have thriven. To you they are indebted for whatever strength or beauty they possess. When Kings and Ministers are forgotten, when the force and direction of personal satire is no longer understood, and when measures are only felt in their remotest consequences, this book will, I believe, be found to contain principles worthy to be transmitted to posterity. When you leave the unim. paired hereditary freehold to your children, you do but half your duty. Both liberty and property are precarious, unless the possessors have sense and spirit enough to defend them. This is not the language of vanity. If I am a vain man, my gratification lies within a narrow circle. I am the sole depository of my own secret, and it shall perish with me.

If an honest, and, I may truly affirm, a laborious zeal for the public service, has given me any weight in your esteem, let me exhort and conjure you, never to suffer an invasion of

your political constitution, however minute the instance may appear, to pass by, without a deter. mined, persevering resistance. One precedent creates another. They soon accumulate, and constitute law. What yesterday was fact, today is doctrine. Examples are supposed to justify the most dangerous measures ; and, where they do not suit exactly, the defect is supplied by analogy. Be assured, that the laws which protect us in our civil rights, grow out of the constitution, and they must fall or flourish with it. This is not the cause of faction, or of party, or of any individual, but the common interest of every man in Britain. Although the King should continue to support his present

[ocr errors]

system of government, the period is not very distant, at which you will have means of redress in your own power. It may be nearer, perhaps, than any of us expect; and I would warn you to be prepared for it. The King may possibly be advised to dissolve the present Par. siament a year or two before it-expires of course, and precipitate a new election, in hopes of taking the nation by surprise. If such a measure be in agitation, this very caution may defeat or prevent it.

I cannot doubt that you will unanimously assert the freedom of election, and vindicate your exclusive right to choose your representatives. But other questions have been started, on which your determination should be equally clear and unanimous. Let it be impressed upon your minds, let it be instilled into your chil. dren, that the liberty of the press is the palladium of all the civil, political, and religious rights of an Englishman: and that the right of juries to return a general verdict, in all cases whatsoever, is an essential part of our constitution, not to be controlled or limited by the judges, nor, in any shape, questionable by the Legislature. The power of King, Lords, and Commons, is not an arbitrary power*. They

* This positive denial of an arbitrary power being vested in the legislature, is not, in fact, new doctrine. When the Earl of Lindsey,

in the year 1675, brought a bill into the House of Lords,

To prevent the dangers which might arise from persons disaffected to government, by which an oath and penalty was to be imposed upon the members of both Houses, it was affirmed in a protest, signed by twenty-three lay Peers, (my Lords the Bishops were not accustomed to pro test,) “ That the privilege of sitting and voting “ in Parliament, was an honour they had by “ birth, and a right so inherent in them, and “ inseparable from them, that nothing could take it away, but what by the law of the land “ must withal take away their lives, and cor “ rupt their blood.” These noble Peers (whose names are a reproach to their posterity) have, in this instance, solemnly denied the power of Parliament to alter the constitution.

Under a

« ElőzőTovább »