The Rose of Sharon: A Religious Souvenir

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A. Tompkins and B. B. Mussey, 1857
 

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257. oldal - And I saw as it were a sea of glass mingled with fire : and them that had gotten the victory over the beast, and over his image, and over his mark, and over the number of his name, stand on the sea of glass, having the harps of God.
262. oldal - How pure at heart and sound in head, With what divine affections bold Should be the man whose thought would hold An hour's communion with the dead. In vain shalt thou, or any, call The spirits from their golden day, Except, like them, thou too canst say, My spirit is at peace with all.
262. oldal - Except, like them, thou too canst say My spirit is at peace with all. They haunt the silence of the breast, Imaginations calm and fair, The memory like a cloudless air, t The conscience as a sea at rest...
91. oldal - OH never another dream can be Like that early dream of ours, When the fairy Hope lay down to sleep, Like a child, among the flowers.
209. oldal - All things are full of labor; man cannot utter it: the eye is not satisfied with seeing, nor the ear filled with hearing. The thing that hath been, it is that which shall be; and that which is done is that which shall be done: and there is no new thing under the sun.
253. oldal - Kich and low, the wild strain gushes From her slender throat ; Every bird its carol hushes As her trancing note Mingles with the fountain's silvery play. Lone, unconscious, thus she wiles away Ever, evermore, Life in musings on Zanoni, The Seeker of the Stars. Ah, sweet maid ! give o'er thy dreaming Of the youthful sage ! Shun the light forbidden, gleaming From the mystic page Of his volumes weird and old ! Waken ! there is peril, danger, In his glance, his smile ; Wed thee with the English stranger...
255. oldal - Now a new, divine emotion, Fathomlessly deep, Wakes thy bosom, like the ocean, Nevermore to sleep ; Never to be banished thence, — Never, until thought and sense, Lost forevermore, Die to earth and to Zanoni, The Seeker of the Stars. When thy song's full tide was filling Life's diviner part, Like a flash electric, thrilling All the thousands' heart, — Did not his smile wake thy wondrous power When, thy radiant robes around thee, All the mighty throng.
254. oldal - Else ! betake thee, silent, lonely, To thy chamber still, Though thy father's spirit, only, Crosses now the sill By the living crossed of yore ! Though no eyes, save his, now meet thee By the twilight hearth ; Though no voice but his may greet thee, Nor, in song nor mirth, Friend or lover cometh more, Linger there and shut thy door Closely evermore, Ere glides in the pale Zanoni, The Seeker of the Stars. Warning vain ! thy heart is fated ! Thine is woman's lot ! By thy side Love long has waited,...
254. oldal - As her trancing note Mingles with the fountain's silvery play. Lone, unconscious, thus she wiles away Ever, evermore, Life in musings on Zanoni, The Seeker of the Stars. Ah, sweet maid ! give o'er thy dreaming Of the youthful sage ! Shun the light forbidden, gleaming From the mystic page Of his volumes weird and old ! Waken ! there is peril, danger, In his glance, his smile ; Wed thee with the English stranger — He will not beguile. Though his lips be sometimes cold, He is yet of mortal mould ;...
120. oldal - did they not speak in tongues ? " Yes, but they did not learn anything, unless there was an interpreter present. The Apostle Paul said, he had rather speak five words, with his understanding, than ten thousand words in an unknown tongue.

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