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CONTENTS

Page

Modern Biography.

Mr. Sheridan's Short Address to the

Lord John Cavendish

327

Public

374

Dr. William Hunter

329 More Lyric Odes, to the Royal Acade.

Miss Seward

332 micians. By Peter Pindat : 375

Modern Improvements.

Poetry:

Exhibition at the Royal Academy 335

Princes Place; an Elegy

377

Exhibition of the Society of Artists ibid. The Voice of Wisdom

Mr. Barry's Exhibition in the Adél-

Liberty. In the Mannet of Spenser

379

phi

ibid. Verses, written in Dr. Darwin's Botani-

Description of the Seat of Sir Charles

cal Garden, near Litchfield - ibid.

Algill, near Richmond, Surrey -

Verses, on the Marriage of the Honour-

Miscellany.

able Miss Elizabeth Sackville, to

Philosophical Survey of the Works of

Colonel Herbert

380

Nature and Art. Number Y..

339

Invocation to Poverty

ibid.

Philosophical Transactions.

Occasional Prologue, on opening the

Account of a Luminous Appearance

Haymarket Theatre -

381

in the Heavens

343 Prologue to Tristram Shandy - ibid.

Account of an Earthquake at Ha-

Bacchanalian Song, sung at Ranelagh ibid.

fodunos, near Denbigh

ibid. Return of Peace, an Ode, performed

Account of the Appearance of the

at Vauxhall

Soil at opening a Well at Hanby,

Hunting Song, sung at Vauxhall ibid.

in Lincolnshire

344 The Charming Creature, sung at Vaux-

Cecilia Wevil. A Moral Tale

345

hall

ibid.

A Card to Mrs. G***, of L***

351

Public Amusements.

The Busy Body. Number X. 352

Drury Lane.

Review and Guardian of Literature.

Imitation, or the Female Fortune

Mr. Harrison's Collection of Poems,

Hunters

383

published under the Title of the Lady's

Covent Garden.

Poetical Magazine, or Beauties of

Tristram Shandy

British Poetry

357 The Spanish Curate

ibid.

Molleson's Reports of the Commis-

Haymarket Theatre

384

fioners of Public Accounts

359

King's Theatre, Haymarket

ibid.

Valentine Green's Review of the Polite

Vauxhall Garden

ibid.

Arts in France, at the Time of their

Pantheon

ibid.

Establishment- under Louis XIV. Parliamentary, Hiftory.

compared with their present State in

House of Commons

385

England

Political Retrospect

387

Dr. Priestley's History of the Corrup Foreign Intelligence

389

tion of Christianity

Gazette

391

Simplicity recommended to Minifters Monthly Chronicle

395

of the Gospel

364 Births

400

The Two Mentors. A Modern Story ibid. Marriages

Ibid.

Reports of the Humane Society, for

Deaths

ibid.

the Years 1781, and 1782 - 369 Civil Promotions

401

An Introduction to the Study of Polite Military Promotions

402

Literature - •1-

ibid. Ecclefiaftical Preferments

403

Mrs. Cowley's Which is the Man?

370 Bankrupts

ibid.

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ADVERTISEMEN T.

ROM the fullest Conviction of the utter Impossibility of methodiz

ing, arranging, printing, and publishing, any Miscellany, calculated to comprize all the Events of a Month, by the First Day of the succeeding one the Editors of the BRITISH MAGAZINE and REVIEW, who are determined to preserve in their work a compleat Monthly Register of authenticated Transactions, properly selected and digested, have come to the Resolution of making their Day of Publication the TENTH of each succeeding Month; so that the Magazine for June (as is, indeed, the Case with the present Number) shall contain all the Occurrences which may happen in the Month from which it receives it's Appellation, including even the very last Day.

This is the shortest Time in which Facts can be sufficiently ascertained, digefted, and printed, so as to be safely recorded in a Work where they are meant to be preserved for Ages.

It is different with Newspapers; the impatient Curiosity of whose Readers must at all Events be gratified, and which, being of no Value after they are once perused, are not liable to mislead' at any future Period.

To remedy this manifest Defect, fome have adopted the Method of publishing in the Middle of the succeeding Month; but as these have always continued their temporary Articles beyond the Limits of the preceding one, they have uniformly fallen into an Error equally fatal.

In short, there seems no Way of rationally contriving a Magazine for a particular Month, calculated to satisfy Ladies and Gentlemen of Sense and Discernment, without including every Transaction in that Month; and as the Endeavours of the EDITORS of the BRITISH MAGAZINE and Review have constantly been exerted to secure the Approbation of Persons of this Description, they are convinced that the Alteration in the Day of publishing their future Numbers will prove highly satisfactory to their very numerous Friends, who cannot fail to see the Propriety of the Measure,

good

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** Answers to Correspondents must be deferred till our next.

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TH'E

BRITISH MAGAZINE AND REVIEW

OR,

UNIVERSAL MISCELLANY.

MAY 1783.

MODERN BIOGRAPHY.

trious family of the Cavendishes is fufLORD JOHN CAVENDISH.

ficiently known to every person in the *HE Right Honourable John Ca- smallest degree acquainted with the

; John Cavendish, is the fourth son of tegrity, and native goodness of heart, William, the third Duke and fixth Earl, the present subject of our memoirs of Devonshire, by Catharine, daughter yields not to the proudeft of his anand sole heir of John Hoskins, Efq. cestors. Above the paltry views of of the county of Middlesex; and third ambition or intereft, he acts invariably uncle of William, the present and fifth from the di&tates of a heart which does Dake, and eighth Earl, of Devonshire. honour to human nature: and though His lordship was born in or about the we will not be hardy enough to say he year 1730, and was elected a mem may never err, we shall 'rifque little ber of parliament for the boroughs of in afferting, that Lord John Cavendish Weymouth and Melcombe-Regis, Dor? will never perfift in error after the mofetshire, in 1754; for Knaresborough ment of conviction. From principle in the county of York, in 1961; and he opposed the measures of Lord North, in the last and present parliaments for during that celebrated minifter's long the city of York. On the 27th of adminiftration; and equally from prinMarch 1782, his lordfhip was appoint ciple we have lately seen him affift in ed Chancellor of the Exchequer; in conciliating such an arrangement as which office he continued till a fhort he supposes will best serve his country, time after the decease of his noble With all the arđour of genuine patriofriend, the Marquis of Rockingham, tic enthusiasm; with all the affiduity, but retired on the Earl of Shelburne's perseverance, and honour, of disinpromotion to the Treasury.

terested zeál; he constantly endeavours His lordship continued out of office to discharge what he considers as his till the late coalition; when he again duty in a public capacity: in private accepted the chancellorship of the Ex life, he is the secret patron of merit, chequer, on the refignation of the Ho, and the unoftentatious dispenser of nourable Mr. William Pitt, by whom benevolence. While we contemplate he had himself been fucceeded. the general character of this worthy The unsullied honour of the illus- man, it is impossible not to remember

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