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1. The leading qualifications which this society require in the candidates whom they undertake to patronize are-A firm belief of the doctrines of Christ, as revealed in Scripture; a sincere devotedness of heart to God and his cause; a life and conversation that correspond with this profession, and evidence the reality of their faith ; a wellinformed and firm attachment to the doctrine and discipline of the established Church ; and competent natural talents, with a desire to make progress in literature.

2. In all and each of these points, the candidates are examined by a committee, consisting of eighteen clergymen, before they are admitted on the society's list: likewise, testimonials of their character and piety are required, under the hand of ministers of the established Church, who have long and personally known them. Every candidate that gives not full satisfaction to the committee, is rejected.

3. The young men who are received by the society, are placed under suitable private tutors till they are qualified either to enter at college, or to be admitted into holy orders without a university education. Thirteen have been already ordained, and are now faithfully labouring in the gospel vineyard. Three more are now at college, and one under private tuition. Some of these have received but partial assistance from the society's fund.

4. The society, while they gratefully adore the goodness of God in enabling them to do so much in a work they have so near at heart, deeply lament their inability to do more. Their fund, though gradually improving, has been hitherto in a low state : the amount of their annual subscriptions not more than one hundred and fifty pounds. With sincere gratitude do they acknowledge the several and liberal donations of

£20, £50, and £100, and one of still greater amount, which they have been kindly favoured with. And with equal gratitude would they here mention a few legacies, which some benevolent friends to the institution have bequeathed towards furthering its design. These generous and bountiful gifts have hitherto enabled the society to proceed successfully, without any painful embarrassment.

5. As the object of this society is in itself laudable, and of useful tendency, they trust that their motives in establishing this institution are such as cannot be condemned. Being all members of the established Church, they are necessarily interested in its welfare and prosperity. In reviewing the manifold blessings and inestimable privileges with which they and their forefathers have been fostered and nourished in the bosom of this Church, they are induced, with filial affections and pious gratitude, to make the best returns in their power : and can they discharge their obligation in a better way, than by training up faithful pastors to preach her genuine doctrines, and to feed her children with the true bread ?

6. The true friends of the established Church, and of the gospel of Christ, had never a louder call to stand forward in her defence than in these days of rebuke and blasphemy, when the church has to contend with hosts of formidable enemies, who would corrupt her doctrines, sap her foundation, and lay her honour in the dust. When the spirit of rebellion and the voice of blasphemy fill the land, it is high time for all who love the gates of Sion, and wish to see the prosperity of Jerusalem, The Corporation of the Sons of the Clergy, Arose out of the “ festivals of the sons of the clergy,” when that had lasted some years, and cases of distress, which it was not within the scope and means of that festival to relieve, were continually presented to the notice of the public. It was incorporated by king Charles II. in 1688, and is possessed of land and funded property which produces an income of more than £15,000 per annum. The revenues are distributed by a court of assistants elected out of the body of governors :

1. In pensions and benefactions to the widows of necessitous clergymen, and to such maiden daughters of deceased clergymen, whose age exceeds forty-five years. Those who participate in these benefactions are so numerous that the sum given to each does not exceed £10.

2. In benefactions of from ten to twenty pounds given annually to curates with small incomes, and poor clergymen with large families.

3. In apprenticing the children of poor clergymen, and assisting them subsequently to settle in business.

4. In extending relief to cases of distress amongst the clergy and their families, not coming within any of the foregoing provisions, from a special fund, which has, within the last few years, been vested in the corporation.

Application to be made at the corporation house, 2, Bloomsbury place, London.

Incorporated Clergy Orphan Society.

(Formed 1749, Incorporated 1809.)

Under the title of “the governors of the society for clothing, maintaining, and educating poor orphans of clergymen of the established Church, in that part of the United Kingdom called England, until of age to be put apprentice.” This charity is under the patronage of her majesty, and the presidency of the archbishop of Canterbury, and is supported by benefactions and annual subscriptions. The number of children on the establishment has been gradually increasing from eighty to about one hundred and thirty, the funds of the charity having also received a gradual increase ; and as many children are now admitted as the building is capable of containing.

Two elections take place annually, one on the last Thursday in February, and the other in May.

A special fund was established in 1826, called “the clergy orphan apprenticing fund,” for the purpose of assisting the children, when they leave the schools, in obtaining suitable apprenticeships. It is placed under the management of the general committee.

The Clerical Education Society,

Formed at Creaton, in the county of Northampton, in the year 182, educates, or assists in educating, proper persons for the Christian ministry in the established Church. The following particulars are collected from their “ Circular.”

1. The leading qualifications which this society require in the candidates whom they undertake to patronize are,—A firm belief of the doctrines of Christ, as revealed in Scripture; a sincere devotedness of heart to God and his cause; a life and conversation that correspond with this profession, and evidence the reality of their faith ; a wellinformed and firm attachment to the doctrine and discipline of the established Church ; and competent natural talents, with a desire to make progress

in literature. 2. In all and each of these points, the candidates are examined by a committee, consisting of eighteen clergymen, before they are admitted on the society's list: likewise, testimonials of their character and piety are required, under the hand of ministers of the established Church, who have long and personally known them. Every candidate that gives not full satisfaction to the committee, is rejected.

3. The young men who are received by the society, are placed under suitable private tutors till they are qualified either to enter at college, or to be admitted into holy orders without a university education. Thirteen have been already ordained, and are now faithfully labouring in the gospel vineyard. Three more are now at college, and one under private tuition. Some of these have received but partial assistance from the society's fund.

4. The society, while they gratefully adore the goodness of God in enabling them to do so much in a work they have so near at heart, deeply lament their inability to do more. Their fund, though gradually improving, has been hitherto in a low state : the amount of their annual subscriptions not more than one hundred and fifty pounds. With sincere gratitude do they acknowledge the several and liberal donations of £20, £50, and £100, and one of still greater amount, which they have been kindly favoured with. And with equal gratitude would they here mention a few legacies, which some benevolent friends to the institution have bequeathed towards furthering its design. These generous and bountiful gifts have hitherto enabled the society to proceed successfully, without

any painful embarrassment. 5. As the object of this society is in itself laudable, and of useful tendency, they trust that their motives in establishing this institution are such as cannot be condemned. Being all members of the established Church, they are necessarily interested in its welfare and prosperity. In reviewing the manifold blessings and inestimable privileges with which they and their forefathers have been fostered and nourished in the bosom of this Church, they are induced, with filial affections and pious gratitude, to make the best returns in their power : and can they discharge their obligation in a better way, than by training up faithful pastors to preach her genuine doctrines, and to feed her children with the true bread ?

6. The true friends of the established Church, and of the gospel of Christ, had never a louder call to stand forward in her defence than in these days of rebuke and blasphemy, when the church has to contend with hosts of formidable enemies, who would corrupt her doctrines, sap her foundation, and lay her honour in the dust. When the spirit of rebellion and the voice of blasphemy fill the land, it is high time for all who love the gates of Sion, and wish to see the prosperity of Jerusalem, to use their utmost efforts to supply the Church of Christ with truth and godliness : and how can this be more effectually accomplished than by educating devout and holy men for the Christian ministry?

7. The society therefore venture to solicit the kind assistance of the friends of truth and piety, to enable them to proceed with increasing energy, and on a more extended scale. Past experience, and the present happy complexion of the public mind, combined with the magnitude of the object, greatly encourage the society to expect extensive liberality from a numerous and increasing list of friends. Those who shall read this report, are earnestly entreated seriously to consider the obligations they are under to promote the religion of God in a fallen world. Let them duly reflect on the great good they may do at a cheap rate : let them contemplate the benefit they have in their power to confer on their country and on the universal church by increasing the number of faithful heralds to publish salvation, and they will deem it a privilege to assist in building the sacred temple, and promoting the interest of the Saviour's kingdom. They whose hearts are engaged in this sacred service, and feel interested in the welfare of the Church of Christ, will naturally use their influence to induce others to come forward and help in the work of the Lord.

8. And when they who have been favoured with the treasures of both worlds, come to leave their earthly for their heavenly inheritance, in what way can they better express their gratitude for their worldly treasures, or dispose of them more agreeably to the will of God, than by devoting a proper portion of the same towards carrying on his cause, and promoting the interest of his kingdom in this world of sin and misery.

9. When we have done what we can, we have done nothing effectually without God's blessing on the labours of our hands. As all his purposes are accomplished by the use of means and instruments, we should labour with as much diligence and exertions as if we expected no divine assistance, and yet as entirely depend on God's blessing to crown our labours with success, as if we had done nothing. Believing, as the members of this society do, that the Holy Ghost alone can give success and prosperity to the work which they have taken up in the name of the Lord, they earnestly intreat that all who wish well to their cause will ardently pray God to endue them with wisdom and faithfulness, and crown their labours with success, to the praise and glory of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ.

Trustees of the society.-- Abel Smith, Esq. M. P., Robert Ramsden, Esq., Hon. and Rev. L. Powys, Joseph Wilson, Esq.

Secretary, Rev. T. Jones.
There are other similar institutions at Bristol, Elland, &c.

Cambridge Clerical Education Society,

(Established 1837.) 1. Was formed for the purpose of assisting through their academical course such young men of limited means, as by their piety, talent, and diligence, give reasonable promise of afterwards becoming efficient ministers of the Church of England.

2. That the assistance to be rendered shall be confined to the cases of young men already resident members of the university, whose characters and circumstances shall appear to the directors to come within the conditions of the foregoing resolution.

3. That regularity in the observance of college duties and diligence in attention to academical studies be considered indispensable qualifications in every candidate for the aid of this society.

4. That the assistance be given only by vote from year to year, or from term to term, at the discretion of the directors; and that all sums of money voted be paid through the respective college tutors.

5. That the business of the society be conducted by a board of directors consisting of nine in addition to the treasurer and secretary, all of whom shall be resident members of the university ; and that five form a quorum : vacancies, occurring by removal or otherwise, to be filled up by the existing board.

6. That the directors shall meet for business once in every term, or oftener as circumstances may render expedient : the fixed days of meeting to be the Thursday before the division in the Michaelmas and Lent terms, and the second Thursday in the Easter term.

7. That an annual statement of accounts, with a list of subscribers, be printed and forwarded to the contributors. 8. That the following persons be the directors :

Rev. J. Scholefield, A.M. Regius Professor of Greek, Treasurer.
Rev. T. Webster, B.D. late Fellow of Queen's College.
Rev. F. W. Lodington, B.D. Fellow of Clare Hall.
Rev. G. E. Corrie, B.D. Fellow of Catharine Hall.
Rev. R. Waterfield, B.D. Fellow of Emmanuel College.
Rev. J. F. Isaacson, B.D. Fellow of St. John's College.
Rev. H. Calthrop, B.D. Fellow of Corpus Christi College.
Rev. W. Carus, A.M. Fellow of Trinity College.
Rev. C. Perry, A.M. Fellow of Trinity College.
Rev. J. J. Smith, A.M. Fellow of Caius College.

Rev. G. Langshaw, A.M. Fellow of St. John's College, Secretary. Institutions for the Relief of Clergymen's Widows and Daughters,

Bromley College, Kent. Was founded in 1666, by John Warner, bishop of Rochester, who endowed it with £450 per annum, for the residence and support of twenty widows of loyal and orthodox clergymen, to each of whom he assigned £20 per annum, and to a chaplain £50. This endowment has been augmented by many subsequent benefactions. In 1767, the Rev. William Hetherington bequeathed £2000 old South Sea annuities to purchase coal and candles for the use of the establishment.

In 1774, Dr. Zachary Pearce, bishop of Rochester, gave £5000 in the same stock for the augmentation of the widows' pensions. In 1782, William Pearce, the bishop's brother, bequeathed £10,000 for the erection and endowment of ten additional houses. In 1788, Mr. Betenson left £10,000, in the three per cents., for building and endowing ten additional houses. In 1823, Walter King, bishop of Rochester, gave £3000 three per cents. for the payment of £30 each to three out-pensioners. And in 1824,

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