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Prov. xv. for the morning, and Prov. xvi. for the evening service; the collect, epistle, and gospel, being taken from the sixth Sunday after the Epiphany; the proper lessons for the twenty-sixth Sunday after Trinity are Prov. xvii. for the morning, and Prov. xix. for the evening service; the collect, epistle, and gospel, for the twenty-fifth Sunday after Trinity being used.

When there are twenty-seven Sundays after Trinity, on the twenty-fifth, Prov. xv. and xvi. respectively should be read, for the proper lessons of the day; and the collect, epistle, and gospel, for the fifth Sunday after Epiphany; on the twenty-sixth Sunday after Trinity, Prov. xvii. and xix. respectively, for the proper lessons; and the collect, epistle, and gospel, for the sixth Sunday after Epiphany ; and on the twenty-seventh Sunday after Trinity, for the proper lessons, the chapters appointed for the day of the month ; * and the collect, epistle, and gospel, for the twenty-fifth Sunday after Trinity.

While speaking of alterations, we may remark that the word “ may should not be inserted in the “General Thanksgiving,” in the sentence,

“And that we shew forth thy praise." A similar form of speech is used in the third collect, for grace,” “grant that this day we fall (not we may fall) into no sin.”

As to PUBLICATION of matters in church, by 1 Vict. c. 45, s. I, it is enacted that no proclamation, or other public notice, of avestry meeting, or any other matter, shall be made or given in a church or chapel

, during or after divine service, or at the door of any church or chapel, at the conclusion of divine service. And by s. 4, no decree relating to any faculty, nor any other decree, citation, or proceeding whatsoever, in any ecclesiastical court, shall be read or published in any church or chapel, during or immediately after divine service.

EXCEPTIONS. Publication of banns of matrimony ; notices of celebration of divine service, or sermons; declaration of holy days and fasting days in the week following, by the curate in pursuance of the rules in the book of Common Prayer. Proclamation or publication of what is prescribed by the rules of Common Prayer, or enjoined by the queen or ordinary, are specially excepted out of the operation of the Act, by s. 5.

“ All PROCLAMATIONS and NOTICES, which, by law or custom, have heretofore been made or given in churches, during, or after divine service, shall be reduced into writing, and copies thereof, either in writing or in print, or partly in writing and partly in print, shall, previously to the commencement of divine service, on the several days on which such proclamation, or notices have heretofore been made or given in the church, &c., or at the door of any church, be affixed on or near to the doors of all the churches or chapels within such parish or place; and such notices, when so affixed, shall be in lieu of, and as a substitute for, all the several proclamations and notices to all intents,' &c. by s. 2.

DISTURBING public worship. By 1 Will. III. c. 18, If any person shall willingly, and of purpose, maliciously or contemptuously, come into any cathedral or parish church, chapel, or other congregation permitted by this Act, and disquiet or disturb the same, or misuse any

Some writers recommend reading Isa. Ixv. and lxvi. as the proper lessons for this day. But it is surely more correct, where no particular chapters are given, to read such as are appointed for the day of the month on which that Sunday falls. This remark will also apply to the lessons for Ash Wednesday.

preacher or teacher, he shall, on proof thereof, before a justice of the peace, by two witnesses, find two sureties to be bound by recognizance in the sum of £50., and in default of such sureties, shall be committed to prison, there to remain till the next general or quarter sessions; and upon conviction of the said offence, at such session, shall suffer the penalty of £2003 13,5141,513:11; 3 DOUBLE DUTY in each church. The church service, according to the form prescribed in the book of Common Prayer, is to be regularly performed every Sunday in the morning and evening. If less duty is required, any relaxation must be adopted with the approbation of the diocesan, who is to judge of the degree to be allowed, and the minister must strictly adhere to the terms prescribed, and not vary them for his own convenience. (Burnett v. Bonaker. 2 Hag. 27. See also 1 & 2 Vict. c. 106, s. 60.)

The TIME of divine service should be fixed so as to best suit the convenience of the parishioners, and be punctually attended to.

The Common Prayer shall be said or sung distinctly and reverently -in such PLACE of every church as the bishop of the diocese, or ecclesiastical ordinary of the place, shall think meet for the largeness or straitness of the same, so as the people may be most edified.” (Canon xiv.)

A convenient seat to be made for the minister to read service in. (Canon Ixxxi.) 11"16041") full 117210-26-1 seri bisa

GENERAL REMARKS ! on certain parts of the service.' In the performance of divine worship no deacon should read the “absolution," but pass on to the Lord's Prayer," there is no authority for the substitution of any collect in the place of the absolution, it having never been contemplated by the compilers of the liturgy that any church should be left under the care of a deacon alone." It is a monstrous abuse. When a saint's day falls upon a Sunday, the collect for each should be read, but the epistle and gospel appointed for the Sunday."

Publication of banns should be made immediately after the reading of the second lesson, and not after the Nicene' creed.

The collect, "O God, whose nature and property." &c., should be read immediately before “the general thanksgiving.” }+!

If there be twenty-seven Sundays after Trinity, for the twenty-fifth and twenty-sixth read the collect, epistle, and gospel, for the fifth and sixth Sunday after the Epiphany respectively.

;';'!??? In some churches, marriages are solemnized in the middle of the service, and the thanksgiving of women after child-birth, these things are highly indecorous. Nothing but a baptism is direéted to be performed during the regular morning and evening service, and the reasons for this are stated in the rubric ordering the same.

Notice for the celebration of the Lord's supper should be read immediately after the Nicene creed, while the people are all standing. Where there is no morning service, or in the afternoon and evening, the notice should be read after “The grace of our Lord," &c., the people sitting. An attention to this will prevent much confusion.

SINGING. The whole service of the church, where not directed by the rubric br ordinary, is subject to the discretion of the officiating minister, who may direct what shall, and what shall not be sung. No instruments can be introduced without his permission. The tunes are

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at his discretion. “To prevent improprieties in the performance of this excellent part of public devotion, and to provide for due solemnity in it as well as in the rest, it is much to be wished, that ministers should not leave the choice of proper psalms (or hymns) to their parish clerks, but take upon themselves the trouble of directing it; or rather, that they should, once for all, fix and establish a course of psalms (and hymns), to be given out and sung in their order.” *

With regard to the SELECTION of psalms, or psalms and hymns, or hymns without psalms, there is no authority, in this point, for the use of one selection rather than another. The choice rests with the minister entirely. The present versions of Sternhold and Hopkins, or Tate and Brady, are as unauthorized as the hymns of Watts or Wesley. The following is queen Elizabeth's injunction on the subject, “That in the beginning, or in the end of Common Prayer, either at morning or evening, there may be sung a hymn, or such like song, to the praise of Almighty God, in the best sort of melody and music that may be conveniently devised, having respect that the sentence of the hymn may be understanded and perceived." +

PRAYER BEFORE SERMON. The 55 canon, on the form of a prayer to be used by all preachers before their sermons, directs that “before all sermons, lectures, and homilies, the preachers and ministers shall move the people to join with them in prayer, in this form, or to this effect, as briefly as conveniently may be :-Ye shall pray for Christ's holy catholic church, that is, for the whole congregation of Christian people dispersed throughout the whole world, and especially for the churches of England, Scotland, and Ireland ; and herein I require you most especially to pray for the king's most excellent majesty, our sovereign lord James, king of England, Scotland, France, and Ireland, defender of the faith, and supreme governor in these realms, and all other his dominions and countries, over all persons, in all causes, as well ecclesiastical as temporal; ye shall also pray for our gracious queen Anne, the noble prince Henry, and the rest of the king and queen's royal issue ; ye shall also

pray

for the ministers of God's holy word and sacraments, as well archbishops and bishops, as other pastors and curates ; ye shall also pray for the king's most honorable council, and for all the nobility and magistrates of this realm ; and that all and every of these, in their several callings, may serve truly and painfully to the glory of God, and the edifying and well governing of his people, remembering the account that they must make; also ye

shall
pray

for the whole commons of this realm, that they may live in the true faith, and fear of God, in humble obedience to the king, and brotherly charity one to another. Finally, let us praise God for all those which are departed out of this life in the faith of Christ, and pray unto God, that we may have grace to direct our lives after their good example ; that, this life ended, we may be made partakers with them of the glorious resurrection in the life everlasting ; always concluding with the Lord's prayer.”

The following form may be found useful :

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Bishop Mant's “Book of Common Prayer,” &c. p. 134. + Injunctions to the Clergy, A. D. 1559. Sparrow, Collect. Art. Can. 4to.

Prayer used in the University Pulpits.

Let us pray,

For Christ's holy catholic church, particularly that pure and reformed part of it established in this kingdom :

For all Christian sovereigns, princes, and governors, especially her most excellent majesty our sovereign lady, VICTORIA, by the grace of God, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, queen, defender of the faith, over all persons and in all causes, within her dominions supreme :

For Adelaide, the queen dowager, the prince Albert, and all the royal family :

For the lords, and others of her majesty's most honourable privy council :

For the great council of the nation, now assembled in Parliament, (as the case may be); for all the nobility, magistrates, and gentry of the realm :

For the ministers and dispensers of God's holy word and sacraments, whether they be the archbishops, particularly William lord archbishop of this province ; or bishops, particularly Joseph lord bishop of this diocese; or the inferior clergy, the priests and deacons ; that all these in their several stations, may serve truly and faithfully to the honour of God and the welfare of his people, always remembering that strict and solemn account which they must themselves one day give, before the judgment-seat of Christ.

And that there never may be wanting a supply of persons duly qualified to serve God both in church and state, let us pray for a blessing on all seminaries of sound learning and religious education, especially the universities of this land ; and herein for his grace Hugh, duke of Northumberland, our chancellor; for the right worshipful the vice-chancellor ; for the reverend and learned the professors, proctors, taxors, and all that bear office in this our body; for all particular colleges; and, as in private duty bound, I desire your prayers for the royal and religious foundation of Queen's college ; for the reverend and learned the (president) master, the fellows, scholars, and all the students in the same.

Pray we likewise for the civil incorporation of this town; for the worshipful the mayor, the aldermen, and all that bear office in that body.

Lastly, let us pray for all the commons of the realm ; that they may live in the true faith and fear of God, in dutiful allegiance to the queen, in sincere and conscientious communion with the established church, and in brotherly love and Christian charity one towards another. And as we pray unto God for future mercies, so let us praise his most holy name for those we have already received; for our creation, preservation, and all the blessings of this life; but, above all

, for our redemption through Jesus Christ; for the means of grace afforded us here, and for the hope of glory hereafter.

These prayers and praises let us humbly offer up to the throne of heaven in the words which Christ himself hath taught us :

“Our Father,” &c.

at his discretion. « To prevent improprieties in the performance of this excellent part of public devotion, and to provide for due solemnity in it as well as in the rest, it is much to be wished, that ministers should not leave the choice of proper psalms (or hymns) to their parish clerks, but take upon themselves the trouble of directing it; or rather, that they should, once for all

, fix and establish a course of psalms (and hymns), to be given out and sung in their order.” *

With regard to the SELECTION of psalms, or psalms and hymns, or hymns without psalms, there is no authority, in this point, for the use of one selection rather than another. The choice rests with the minister entirely. The present versions of Sternhold and Hopkins, or Tate and Brady, are as unauthorized as the hymns of Watts or Wesley. The following is queen Elizabeth's injunction on the subject, “That in the beginning, or in the end of Common Prayer, either at morning or evening, there may be sung a hymn, or such like song, to the praise of Almighty God, in the best sort of melody and music that may be conveniently devised, having respect that the sentence of the hymn may be understanded and perceived." +

PRAYER BEFORE SERMON. The 55 canon, on the form of a prayer to be used by all preachers before their sermons, directs that “before all sermons, lectures, and homilies, the preachers and ministers shall move the people to join with them in prayer, in this form, or to this effect, as briefly as conveniently may be :-Ye shall pray for Christ's holy catholic church, that is, for the whole congregation of Christian people dispersed throughout the whole world, and especially for the churches of England, Scotland, and Ireland ; and herein I require you most especially to pray for the king's most excellent majesty, our sovereign lord James, king of England, Scotland, France, and Ireland, defender of the faith, and supreme governor in these realms, and all other his dominions and countries, over all persons, in all causes, as well ecclesiastical as temporal; ye shall also pray for our gracious queen Anne, the noble prince Henry, and the rest of the king and queen’s royal issue ; ye shall also

pray for the ministers of God's holy word and sacraments, as well archbishops and bishops, as other pastors and curates; ye shall also

pray for the king's most honorable council, and for all the nobility and magistrates of this realm ; and that all and every of these, in their several callings, may serve truly and painfully to the glory of God, and the edifying and well governing of his people, remembering the account that they must make ; also ye shall pray for the whole commons of this realm, that they may live in the true faith, and fear of God, in humble obedience to the king, and brotherly charity one to another. Finally, let us praise God for all those which are departed out of this life in the faith of Christ, and pray unto God, that we may have grace to direct our lives after their good example ; that, this life ended, we may be made partakers with them of the glorious resurrection in the life everlasting ; always concluding with the Lord's prayer.”

The following form may be found useful :

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Bishop Mant's “Book of Common Prayer," &c. p. 134. + Injunctions to the Clergy, A.D. 1559. Sparrow, Collect. Art. Can. 4to.

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