Introduction. I. Johnson's preliminary essay - 'On the origin and importance of small tracts and fugitive pieces'. II. Sidney's 'An apologie for poetrie'. III. Campion's 'Obeservations in the art of English poesie'. IV. Daniel's 'A defence of ryme'. V. Swift's 'The importance of the "Guardian" considered'

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Henry Holt & Company, 1897
 

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130. oldal - Now ye shall have three ladies walk to gather flowers, and then we must believe the stage to be a garden. By and by we hear news of shipwreck in the same place, and then we are to blame if we accept it not for a rock. Upon the back of that comes out a hideous monster, with fire and smoke, and then the miserable beholders are bound to take it for a cave. While in the meantime two armies fly in, represented with four swords and bucklers, and then what hard heart will not receive it for a pitched field?
89. oldal - ... cometh to you with words set in delightful proportion, either accompanied with, or prepared for, the well enchanting skill of music; and with a tale forsooth he cometh unto you, with a tale which holdeth children from play, and old men from the chimney corner.
145. oldal - Momus of poetry; then, though I will not wish unto you the ass's ears of Midas, nor to be driven by a poet's verses, as Bubonax was, to hang himself; nor to be rhymed to death, as is said to be done in Ireland; yet thus much curse I must send you...
69. oldal - I speak to show that it is not riming and versing that maketh a poet — no more than a long gown maketh an advocate, who, though he pleaded in armor, should be an advocate and no soldier...
68. oldal - For these third be they which most properly do imitate to teach and delight; and to imitate borrow nothing of what is, hath been, or shall be ; but range, only reined with learned discretion, into the divine consideration of what may be and should be.
136. oldal - But traely many of such writings, as come under the banner of unresistable love, if I were a Mistres, would never perswade mee they were in love...
64. oldal - Which delivering forth also is not wholly imaginative, as we are wont to say by them that build castles in the air : but so far substantially it worketh, not only to make a Cyrus, which had been but a particular excellency, as Nature might have done, but to bestow a Cyrus upon the world, to make many Cyruses, if they will learn aright why and how that maker made him.
55. oldal - And first, truly, to all them that professing learning inveigh against Poetry may justly be objected, that they go very near to ungratefulness, to seek to deface that which, in the noblest nations and languages that are known, hath been the first light-giver to ignorance, and first nurse, whose milk by little and little enabled them to feed afterwards of tougher knowledges.
139. oldal - I do not doubt, when Antonius and Crassus, the great forefathers of Cicero in eloquence, the one (as Cicero testifieth of them) pretended not to know...
109. oldal - Now, for the poet, he nothing^ affirms and therefore never lieth. For as I take it, to lie is to affirm That to be true which is false. So as the other artists, and especially the historian, affirming many things, can in the cloudy knowledge of mankind hardly escape from many lies. But the poet, as I said before, never affirmeth. The poet never maketh any circles about your imagination, to conjure you to believe for true what he writes.

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