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upon me to range this accumulation of elegance and wisdom into an alphabetical series, I soon discovered that the bulk of my volumes would fright away the student, and was forced to depart from my scheme of including all that was pleasing or useful in English literature, and reduce my transcripts very often to clusters of words, in which scarcely any meaning is retained ; thus to the weariness of copying, I was condemned to add the vexation of expunging. Some passages I have yet spared, which may relieve the labour of verbal searches, and in-tersperse with verdure and flowers the dusty desarts of. barren philology:

The examples, thus mutilated, are no longer to be considered as conveying the sentiments or doctrine of their authors ; the word for the sake of which they are inserted, with all its appendant clauses, has been carefully preserved ; but it may sometimes happen, by hasty detruncation, that the general tendency of the sentence may be changed ; the divine may desert his tenets, or the philosopher his system.

Some of the examples have been taken from writers who were never mentioned as masters of elegance, or models of style ; but words must be sought where they are used ; and in what pages, eminent for purity, can terms of manufacture or agriculture be found ? Many quotations serve no other purpose than that of proving the bare existence of words, and are therefore selected with less scrupulousness than those which are to teach their structures and relations.

My purpose was to admit no testimony of living authors, that I might not be misled by partiality, and that

none of my contemporaries might have reason to complain ; nor have I departed from this resolution, but when some performance of uncommon excellence ex. cited my veneration, when my memory supplied me from late books, with an example that was wanting, or when my heart, in the tenderness of friendship, solicited admission for a favourite name.

So far have I been from any care to grace my pages with modern decorations, that I have studiously endeavoured to collect examples and authorities from the writers before the restoration, whose works I regard as the wells of English undefiled, as the pure sources of genuine diction. Our language, for almost a century, has, by the concurrence of many causes, been gradually departing from its original Teutonic character, and deviating towards a Gallic structure and phraseology, from which it ought to be our endeavour to recal it, by making our ancient volumes the ground work of style, admitting among the additions of later times, only such as may supply real deficiencies, such as are readily adopted by the genius of our tongue, and incorporate easily with our native idioms.

But as every language has a time of rudeness antecedent to perfection, as well as of false refinement and declension, I have been cautious lest my zeal for antiquity might drive me into times too remote, and crowd my book with words now no longer understood. I have fixed Sidney's works for the boundary, beyond which I make few excursions. From the authors which rose in the time of Elizabeth, a speech might be formed adequate to all the purposes of use and elegance. If the language

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of theology were extracted from Hooker and the translation of the Bible ; the terms of natural knowledge from Bacon ; the phrases of policy, war, and navigation, from Raleigh ; the dialect of poetry and fiction from Spenser and Sidney ; and the diction of common life from Shaksfeare, few ideas would be lost to mankind, for want of English words, in which they might be expressed.

It is not sufficient that a word is found, unless it be so combined as that its meaning is apparently determined by the tract and tenor of the sentence ; such passages I have therefore chosen, and when it happened that any author gave a definition of a term, or such an explanation as is equivalent to a definition, I have placed his authority as a supplement to my own, without regard to the chronological order, which is otherwise observed.

Some words, indeed, stand unsupported by any aulthority, but they are commonly derivative nouns or adverbs, formed from their primitives by regular and constant analogy, or names of things seldom occurring in books, or words of which I have reason to doubt the existence.

There is more danger of censure from the multiplicity than paucity of examples ; authorities will sometimes seem to have accumulated without necessity or use, and perhaps some will be found, which might, without loss, have been omitted. But a work of this kind is not hastily to be charged with superfluities ; those quotations, which to careless or unskilful perusers appear only to repeat the same sense, will often exhibit to a more accurate examiner, diversities of signification, or, at least, afford different shades of the same meaning ; one will

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shew the word applied to persons, another to things ; one will express an ill, another a good, and a third a neutral sense ; one will prove the expression genuine from an ancient author ; another will shew it elegant from a modern ; a doubtful authority is corroborated by another of more credit ; an anibiguous sentence is ascertained by a passage clear and determinate ; the word, how osten soever repeated, appears with new associates and in different combinations, and every quotation contributes something to the stability or enlargement of the language.

When words are used equivocally, I receive them in either sense ; when they are metaphorical, I adopt them in their primitive acceptation.

I have sometimes, though rarely, yielded to the temptation of exhibiting a genealogy of sentiments, by shew. ing how one author copied the thoughts and diction of another ; such quotations are indeed little more than repetitions, which might justly be censured, did they not gratify the mind, by affording a kind of intellectual history.

The various syntactical structures occurring in the examples have been carefully noted ; the licence or negli. gence with which many words have been hitherto used, has made our style capricious and indiscriminate ; when the different combinations of the same word are exhibited together, the preference is readily given to propriety, and I have often endeavoured to direct the choice.

Thus have I laboured by settling the orthography, displaying the analogy, regulating the structures, and ascertaining the signification of English words, to per

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form all the parts of a faithful lexicographer ; but I have not always executed my own scheine, or satisfied my own expectations. The work, whatever proofs of diligence and attention it may exhibit, is yet capable of many improvements; the orthography which I recommend is still controvertible ; the etymology which I adopt is uncertain, and perhaps frequently erroneous; the explanations are sometimes too much contracted, and sometimes too much diffused, the significations are distinguished rather with subtilty than skill, and the attention is harassed with unnecessary minuteness.

The examples are too often injudiciously truncated, and perhaps sometimes, I hope very rarely, alleged in a mistaken sense ; for in making this collection, I trusted more to memory, than, in a state of disquiet and embarrassment, memory can contain, and purposed to supply at the review what was left incomplete in the first transcription.

Many terms appropriated to particular occupations, though necessary and significant, are undoubtedly omitted; and of the words most studiously considered and exemplified, many senses have escaped observation.

Yet these failures, however frequent, muy admit extenuation and apology. To have attempted much is always laudable, even when the enterprise is above the strength that undertakes it ; to rest below his own aim is incident to every one whose fancy is active, and whose views are comprehensive ; nor is any man satisfied with himself because he has done much, but because he cani conceive little. When first I engaged in this work, I resolved to leave neither words nor things unexamined, VOL. II.

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