The English Language in Its Elements and Forms: With a History of Its Origin and Development : Designed for Use in Colleges and Schools

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Harper & Brothers, 1855 - 754 oldal
 

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Tartalomjegyzék

I
37
V
58
VII
80
IX
97
XI
113
XIII
134
XV
145
XVIII
160
XLVIII
363
XLIX
373
L
378
LI
385
LIII
388
LIV
471
LV
474
LVII
485

XX
164
XXI
169
XXIII
173
XXIV
177
XXVI
186
XXVII
193
XXVIII
203
XXIX
208
XXXI
218
XXXII
221
XXXIII
226
XXXV
228
XXXVI
241
XL
246
XLII
267
XLIV
279
XLV
282
XLVII
308
LIX
500
LX
515
LXII
521
LXV
539
LXVII
561
LXIX
585
LXXI
613
LXXIII
618
LXXV
623
LXXVII
633
LXXVIII
637
LXXIX
648
LXXX
661
LXXXII
674
LXXXIV
698
LXXXV
701
LXXXVI
713
LXXXVIII
726

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Népszerű szakaszok

687. oldal - I see before me the Gladiator lie ; He leans upon his hand — his manly brow Consents to death, but conquers agony. And his droop'd head sinks gradually low, And through his side the last drops, ebbing slow From the red gash, fall heavy one by one, Like the first of a thunder-shower ; and now The arena swims around him — he is gone Ere ceased the inhuman shout which hailed the wretch who won.
682. oldal - Besides, this Duncan Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been So clear in his great office, that his virtues Will plead like angels trumpet-tongued against The deep damnation of his taking-off; And pity, like a naked new-born babe, Striding the blast, or heaven's cherubim horsed Upon the sightless couriers of the air, Shall blow the horrid deed in every eye, That tears shall drown the wind.
110. oldal - He hath made every thing beautiful in his time: also he hath set the world in their heart, so that no man can find out the work that God maketh from the beginning to the end.
166. oldal - Like the leaves of the forest when Summer is green, That host with their banners at sunset were seen: Like the leaves of the forest when Autumn hath blown, That host on the morrow lay withered and strown. For the Angel of Death spread his wings on the blast, And breathed in the face of the foe as he passed...
738. oldal - I care not, fortune, what you me deny : You cannot rob me of free nature's grace ; You cannot shut the windows of the sky, Through which Aurora shows her brightening face ; You cannot bar my constant feet to trace The woods and lawns, by living stream, at eve Let health my nerves and finer fibres brace, And I their toys to the great children leave : Of fancy, reason, virtue, nought can me bereave.
692. oldal - Runs the great circuit, and is still at home. 0 winter, ruler of the inverted year, Thy scattered hair with sleet like ashes filled, Thy breath congealed upon thy lips, thy cheeks Fringed with a beard made white with other snows Than those of age, thy forehead wrapped in clouds, A leafless branch thy sceptre, and thy throne A sliding car, indebted to no wheels, But urged by storms along its slippery way, 1 love thee, all unlovely as thou seem'st, And dreaded as thou art!
63. oldal - The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident; so strong indeed, that no philologer could examine them all three, without believing them to have sprung from some common source, which, perhaps, no longer exists...
702. oldal - Ye pine-groves, with your soft and soul-like sounds ! And they too have a voice, yon piles of snow, And in their perilous fall shall thunder, God!
687. oldal - Even now, methinks, as pondering here I stand I see the rural virtues leave the land. Down where yon anchoring vessel spreads the sail, That idly waiting flaps with every gale, Downward they move, a melancholy band, Pass from the shore and darken all the strand. Contented toil and hospitable care, And kind connubial tenderness are there; And piety, with wishes placed above, And steady loyalty and faithful love.
733. oldal - In the spring a fuller crimson comes upon the robin's breast; In the spring the wanton lapwing gets himself another crest; In the spring a livelier iris changes on the burnish'd dove; In the spring a young man's fancy lightly turns to thoughts of love.

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